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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL 
TOWN REPORT 




CHELMSFORD 

1992 



IN MEMORIAM 

RAYMOND DAY 

Civil Defense Committee 
Town Celebrations Committee 



DONALD E. SMITH 

Board of Selectmen 



Front Cover: 

Daisy Troop 691 bringing plants to the Veterans' Park, Monday, June 8, 1992. 
Before placing the plants, they had their opening ceremonies. Here they're Pledging 
Allegiance to the flag. Lou Higson, leader; Amrita Masurkar, Sara Gearin, Brittney 
Troxel, Pat Betchley, leader; Therese Bergazzi, Lucinda Betchley, Christine Sapienza. 
(Photo by Ann Ringwood, Chief of Photography, Beacon Communications) 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 



Town of Chelmsford 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 

1992 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government. 
Location 



County 

Land Area 

Population 1992 

Assessed Valuation Rate for 1992 

Tax Rate 



United States Senators in Congress: 
5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court 
16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 



Board of Health 

Building Department . 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 



Children's House 



McKay Library 



School Superintendent . 
Town Manager's Office 



Town Clerk 

Tax Collector & Treasurer 
Veterans ' Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle 

on the South, and Westford on the West. It is 24 miles 

from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, and 225 miles 

from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

32,383 

$2,137,354,227 (Real Estate) 

$45,506,133 (Personal Property) 

Flat Rate $14.54 

($14.30 Residential - $15.26 Commercial) 



Martin Meehan, Lowell, MA 
Lucile C. Hicks, Wayland, MA 

Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford, MA 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday *8:30 a.m. 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday *8:30 a.m. 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 



Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday ....9:00 a.m. 

Thursday 1 :00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday ....9:00 a.m. 
Thursday - Closed 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. 

Monday & Wednesday 1:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 1 :00 p.m. 

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. 

Monday *8:30 a.m. 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday *8:30 a.m. 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday *8:30 a.m. 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 



5:00 p.m. 
6:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 
6:30 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 

4:30 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 

9:00 p.m. 
9:00 p.m. 
5:30 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 

5:30 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 
6:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 
6:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 
6:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 
6:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 



'(Except June, July & August) 
MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Tuesday in April 
Last Monday in April 
7:00 p.m. - Every other Monday 
7:30 p.m. - Every other Tuesday 
7:30 p.m. - 2nd & 4th Wednesday 
7:30 p.m. - 4th Thursday 
8:00 p.m. - 1st & 3rd Tuesday 
7:00 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 
7:30 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 



9 Precincts 

McCarthy Middle School 
Town Offices 

Parker School 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 

10 Wilson Street 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




(Front row 1-r) William R. Logan, Chairman; Richard E. DeFreitas, Vice Chairman 
(Back row 1-r) Roger A. Blomgren, Jeffrey A. Brem and Peter V. Lawlor, Clerk 



For the second consecutive year, the Board of 
Selectmen reluctantly said goodbye to two veteran 
Selectmen, Dennis J. Ready and Henrick R. Johnson, 
Jr. Both Dennis and Rhodes have served this commu- 
nity proudly for many years and the contributions to 
our Town are recognized and appreciated. The three 
remaining members welcomed new members Peter V. 
Lawlor and Jeffrey A. Brem, elected in the Town 
Election on April 5,1992, a race in which there were 
eight candidates for the two vacant seats. 

The Board reorganized after the Election and 
elected William R. Logan Chairman, Richard E. 
DeFreitas Vice Chairman and Peter V. Lawlor Clerk. 
Jeffrey Brem and Roger Blomgren held the fourth and 
fifth seats. 

The new Board announced early on its intention 
to be a very productive, accessible and vocal group 
with regards to issues affecting the short and long 
term goals of the Town. Work began on long term 
planning, participation in school reorganizational 



needs, economic development and entrepreneurial 
activities, in addition to several other issues affecting 
the Town. 

During 1992 the Board and the Town Manager 
attended regional and State meetings of the Massa- 
chusetts Municipal Association, the Massachusetts 
Selectmen's Association, the Northern Middlesex 
Council of Governments and the Middlesex County 
Advisory Board. Individual Selectmen also served as 
liaisons between the Board of Selectmen and various 
Town and regional boards and commissions during 
the year. 

The Board also became involved in several issues 
being debated on the State and Federal level which 
would directly impact the Town both financially and 
structurally. Cooperation with Senator Hicks and Rep- 
resentative Cleven, along with Congressman Chester 
Atkins, enabled the Board to continue monitoring 
ongoing legislation. 



We appreciate the support and assistance of our 
State and Federal legislators and look forward to fur- 
ther close ties with them. Together we cannot fail, 
divided we will not succeed. 

On behalf of the residents of the Town of 
Chelmsford, the Board of Selectmen would like to 
thank those townspeople who offer their time and 
energy on the different elected and appointed boards. 
We would also like to recognize the efforts day in and 
day out of the employees throughout the Town - 
their work and dedication on behalf of Chelmsford 
and its citizens is second to none. Finally, many 
thanks to our helpful, patient and understanding staff 
of Judy Carter, Marian Currier, Mary Mahan and 
Jeanne Parziale who assist the Board in our official 
duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William R. Logan, Chairman 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Vice Chairman 

Peter V. Lawlor, Clerk 

Jeffrey A. Brem 

Roger A. Blomgren 



TOWN MANAGER 

A review of 1992 indicates the stabilization of 
Town Government after a period of financial turmoil 
caused by general economic conditions and substan- 
tial reductions of state aid to local governments. I 
believe the Town's relatively positive condition has 
resulted from often times painful actions taken over 
the past several years. Importantly, our now stabilized 
condition with the careful add back of certain Town 
services has positioned us for the future. 

The FY93 Budget which was voted and began in 
1992 provided for additional monies for schools and 
the public library. Other departments saw smaller 
increases or level funding. However, no department 
was required to cut off programs or services and no 
employees were laid off for strictly financial cutbacks. 
Further the Town through a vote of the citizenry 
made the decision to once again finance solid waste 
collection and disposal from tax dollars. This action 
eliminated the not always popular tag system of pay- 
ing for trash collection. 

In addition to painful program and service reduc- 
tions over the past several years the Town's overall 
condition can be attributed to the hard work and dili- 
gence of municipal employees who have endeavored 
to continue to provide the best in municipal services. 



Further we can look to a strategy of working 
smarter. In this vein we have been continually reorga- 
nizing and restructuring our departments and services 
for maximum cost and delivery effectiveness. To this 
end we have also been investing in our processes to 
improve our effectiveness. An example of this strategy 
in 1992 includes the restructuring of the Executive 
Office so as to improve responsiveness, personnel 
administration, procurement practices and strategic 
planning. Another example of this strategy has been 
the restructuring of Veterans' services on a regional 
basis thereby providing savings and long term 
improvement in delivery of these services. An exam- 
ple of the philosophy of investing to improve 
processes is our data processing efforts. In 1992 we 
installed a Novell Network in the Town Offices, hired 
a Data Processing Coordinator, developed a Request 
for Proposals for financial management software, and 
began to provide training for employees in areas of 
computerization including word processing, spread- 
sheets and electronic mail. A final example of work- 
ing smarter are the changes in the Treasurer/Collec- 
tor's Office by newly-hired Finance Director Charles 
Mansfield. These changes have focused upon stream- 
lining collection procedures with the utilization of 
outside vendors, and automatic internal collection 
and financial management practices. 

Another focus of 1992 was in the area of collec- 
tive bargaining as all Town contracts expired on June 
30, 1992. At the close of the year agreements had 
been reached with the following employee groups: 
Highway, Cemetery, Fire and Clerical. In each case 
important concessions were made through negotia- 
tions resulting in long term savings for the Town as 
important changes were made in longevity pay, sick 
leave buy back, holiday pay and management rights. 
The spirit of partnership in these efforts reflects the 
desire of Chelmsford's employees to work with man- 
agement for improving the Town's financial condi- 
tion. 

The past year has also been extremely positive in 
terms of Chelmsford's economic development as 
many businesses both large and small have opted to 
move to, expand, or remain in Chelmsford. Sun 
Microsystems, Mercury Computer, Cadence and 
Waltham Technologies are major companies which 
have chosen to locate in Town filling vacant space 
and employing several thousand people who live, in 
will move to or simply spend money in the Town. 
Other notable investments include the Chelmsford 
Mall which announced two major tenants in F&M 
Distributors and MVP Sports; and the Eastgate Plaza 
which in 1993 will boast a new expanded Demoulas 



Supermarket and a major retail tenant. In addition to 
these, other businesses have also chosen to invest in 
the Town. Numerous factors have contributed to 
these investments including availability of space and 
location, however, the Town has also aided this 
process through investments in infrastructure and in 
philosophy that reaches out to business to work in 
partnership. 

As we look to 1993 we must build upon the 
progress that has been made over the past several 
years. To this end we must continue to work smarter 
and reorganize and restructure for quality services at 
minimum cost, and we must look to the future of the 
Town through strategic planning and investment. 
Major influences and opportunities of 1993 include 
school reform which is currently being considered by 
the state Legislature, and early retirement incentives 
to our employees which will assist our efforts to 
reduce costs and restructure. In short, much work 
and many challenges lie ahead for the Town adminis- 
tration and the Town's people. However, I am confi- 
dent of our ability to do the work and meet the chal- 
lenges. 

As the year 1992 is put behind us I want to thank 
the many highly qualified and committed department 
heads and their employees, and the volunteers who 
give so much to the Town. I want to thank the out- 
standing individuals who worked in the Executive 
Officer over the past year including Judy Carter, Mar- 
ian Currier, Jeannie Parziale, Mary Mahan and Elaine 
Casey. I also want to thank the Board of Selectmen 
for their support and direction over the past twelve 
months including Roger Blomgren, Bill Logan, Dick 
DeFreitas, Peter Lawlor and Jeff Brem as well as out- 
going members Dennis Ready and Rhodes Johnson. 

Finally, I want to thank the citizens of Chelms- 
ford who continue to support the effort of the town 
administration to bring financial stability and quality 
to municipal government. 

Sincerely, 

Bernard F. Lynch 

Town Manager 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



Richard F. Burtt, Jr. 



Judith A. Olsson 
Chairman 



John F. Ketcham 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Ex Officio 

Voting strength as of December 1992 Enrolled Voters: 



VOTERS 




PRECINCT 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


TOTAL 


Total Democrats 


579 


558 


581 


640 


601 


691 


598 


576 


493 


5317 


Total Republicans 


435 


275 


319 


291 


417 


441 


400 


359 


403 


3340 


Total Unenrolled 


1162 


1100 


1408 


1224 


1423 


1351 


1465 


1284 


1303 


11720 


Total New Alliance 
































Total Libertarian 


1 


























4 


Total Ind. Hi Tech 


6 


7 


8 


9 


11 


15 


4 


5 


3 


68 


Total Prohibition 
































Total Green Party USA 
































Total Socialist 
































Total Voters 


2183 


1940 


2316 


2164 


2455 


2498 


2467 


2224 


2202 


20449 



TOWN CLERK 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, CMC 
Town Clerk 






Elizat 
Assist; 


Sporting Licenses 

1557 


Dog Licenses 

2900 


Kennel Licenses 

9 


Recorded Mortgages 

553 


Births inc. 


Deaths 


Marriages 


Intentions 



Elizabeth L. Delaney 



3408 



247 



250 



257 



WARRANT FOR 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

MARCH 10, 1992 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of 
the Town of Chelmsford: 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

William R. Logan, Vice Chairman 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Clerk 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Roger A. Blomgren 



Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you 
are hereby requested to notify and warn the inhabi- 
tants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Pri- 
maries to vote at: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Byam School Cafeteria 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Town Office Building Gymnasium 



On Tuesday, the 10th day of March, 1992 at 7:00 
a.m. until 8:00 p.m. for the following purposes: 

To cast their votes to the Primary Officers for the 
election of candidates of political parties for the fol- 
lowing office.: 

Presidential Preference 

District Members of State Committee (one man 

and one woman) for each Political Party for the 

5th Middlesex Senatorial District; 

35 Members of the Democratic Town Committee; 

35 Members of the Republican Town Committee; 

10 Members of the Independent Voters Party 

Town Committee. 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon at the time and place of 
said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon at the time and place of 
said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 10th day of Febru- 
ary, A.D. 1992. 



DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY ELECTION MARCH 10, 1992 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 1 


Pctl 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


Total 


Blanks 


5 


6 


3 


6 


4 


3 


2 


4 


3 


36 


Ralph Nader 


17 


19 


15 


14 


15 


18 


14 


15 


24 


151 


Lyndon H. LaRouche 


1 


1 





1 














1 


4 


Jerry Brown 


76 


68 


68 


46 


62 


58 


70 


84 


53 


585 


Tom Harkin 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


3 








1 


13 


Larry Agran 





3 





4 











1 


1 


9 


Paul Tsongas 


448 


497 


503 


516 


519 


528 


533 


499 


442 


4485 


Eugene McCarthy 





2 


1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


1 


7 


Bill Clinton 


57 


44 


21 


29 


40 


42 


20 


33 


34 


320 


Robert Kerrey 


4 


2 


4 


4 





1 


1 


4 


3 


23 


No Preference 


2 


8 


4 


6 


1 


3 


1 


2 


3 


30 


Mario Cuomo (write-in) 





1 


1 


1 


3 


2 








2 


10 


Write-in 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


2 





1 


16 


Misc* 
































TOTAL 


613 


655 


624 


632 


648 


662 


644 


642 


569 


5689 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 5th Mldsx. 






















Blanks 


190 


174 


168 


154 


176 


166 


203 


193 


160 


1584 


Thomas J. Larkin 


328 


380 


335 


365 


376 


392 


350 


350 


319 


3195 


Michael J. O'Halloran 


91 


99 


117 


110 


94 


103 


90 


94 


90 


888 


Write-in 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 





1 


1 





10 


Misc' 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 





4 





12 


TOTAL 


613 


655 


624 


632 


648 


662 


644 


642 


569 


5689 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 5th Mldsx. 

Blanks 

Lorraine Greiff 

Lynn W. O'Halloran 

Write-in 

Misc* 



TOTAL 



223 


215 


204 


192 


201 


215 


242 


225 


187 


1904 


209 


212 


233 


211 


263 


244 


221 


235 


204 


2032 


178 


223 


181 


222 


181 


200 


179 


177 


175 


1716 


1 


2 


2 


3 








2 


1 


1 


12 


2 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 





4 


2 


25 



613 



655 



624 



632 



648 



662 



644 



642 



569 5689 



TOWN COMMITTEE 

Blanks 

Linda J. Allen 
Adrienne M. Jerome 
Richard J. Jerome 
Mary E. White 
Robert D. Marazzi 
Samuel Poulten 
Paul J. Cerqua 
Maureen M. Cossette 
Ann T. Chicklis 
Theodore C. Chicklis 
Stratos G. Dukakis 
Alexander W. Gervais 
Cheryl M. Warshafsky 
Barry Warshafsky 
Charles K. Spear 



13027 


13258 


12702 


11859 


13129 


13502 


12878 


12776 


11715 


114846 


243 


277 


253 


320 


287 


269 


281 


279 


247 


2456 


230 


269 


263 


275 


262 


250 


261 


273 


223 


2306 


222 


258 


255 


270 


254 


248 


256 


264 


219 


2246 


261 


281 


267 


342 


282 


336 


288 


291 


252 


2600 


222 


269 


262 


264 


249 


248 


256 


253 


214 


2237 


260 


285 


279 


295 


298 


292 


284 


283 


245 


2521 


231 


256 


248 


276 


263 


255 


275 


262 


219 


2285 


232 


300 


251 


281 


263 


256 


266 


284 


228 


2361 


235 


280 


286 


283 


262 


263 


111 


287 


240 


2413 


226 


267 


267 


275 


258 


255 


265 


268 


228 


2309 


248 


269 


263 


293 


282 


286 


324 


285 


242 


2492 


232 


269 


260 


286 


253 


256 


258 


286 


223 


2323 


249 


276 


255 


304 


291 


288 


274 


282 


240 


2459 


226 


260 


238 


281 


270 


261 


256 


262 


219 


2273 


227 


264 


262 


277 


247 


255 


256 


269 


215 


2272 



Roger G. Trudeau 
Irene J. Cetaruk 
Gail E. Poulten 
Dennis J. Ready 
Eleanor V. McLeman 
Mariannej. Paresky 
Paul F. Allen, Jr. 
Catherine R. Brown 
Grace M. Dunn 
Loretta A. Gelenian 
Yvette M. Lemire 
Bernice F. Poulten 
Christos Simorellis 
Jeannette S. Ralls 
James M. Harrington 
Louise P. Duhamel 
Judith A. Olsson 
Raymond P. McKeon 
John P. Emerson, Jr. 
Gail P. Langner 
Write-in 
Misc* 

TOTAL 



Pctl 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


Total 


237 


272 


241 


276 


256 


263 


264 


282 


223 


2314 


235 


276 


256 


276 


257 


258 


273 


264 


232 


2327 


240 


285 


252 


278 


281 


272 


272 


264 


228 


2372 


277 


292 


301 


334 


346 


348 


352 


322 


273 


2845 


226 


299 


236 


270 


252 


248 


253 


247 


223 


2254 


239 


270 


268 


294 


277 


283 


279 


281 


236 


2427 


229 


257 


233 


280 


249 


247 


253 


256 


215 


2219 


236 


259 


247 


283 


285 


259 


272 


262 


235 


2338 


250 


290 


296 


321 


284 


315 


298 


306 


250 


2610 


229 


311 


244 


276 


261 


254 


265 


261 


223 


2324 


228 


267 


243 


290 


255 


256 


264 


265 


221 


2289 


228 


268 


240 


276 


267 


260 


260 


250 


220 


2269 


246 


277 


278 


294 


300 


283 


288 


295 


249 


2510 


235 


270 


239 


294 


260 


260 


258 


259 


226 


2301 


270 


279 


275 


318 


291 


298 


295 


291 


245 


2562 


228 


258 


238 


280 


252 


254 


254 


249 


223 


2236 


274 


293 


282 


337 


298 


334 


302 


300 


257 


2677 


274 


304 


300 


342 


297 


359 


321 


319 


266 


2782 


267 


294 


309 


317 


296 


317 


295 


323 


256 


2674 


236 


266 


251 


303 


266 


282 


267 


270 


245 


2386 































































21455 22925 21840 22120 22680 23170 22540 22470 19915 199115 



REPUBLICAN PRIMARY ELECTION MARCH 10, 1992 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 


Pctl 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


Total 


Blanks 


3 


1 


3 


1 


4 


3 


4 


3 


1 


23 


Patrick J. Buchanan 


65 


112 


91 


69 


92 


78 


111 


88 


99 


805 


David Duke 


2 





1 


3 


2 


4 


5 


3 


2 


22 


George Bush 


169 


158 


137 


162 


197 


195 


192 


147 


168 


1525 


No Preference 


8 


11 


15 


8 


5 


10 


6 


7 


13 


83 


Write-in 


2 


10 


3 


5 


12 


11 


6 


2 


5 


56 


Misc* 


1 











1 














2 


TOTAL 


250 


292 


250 


248 


313 


301 


324 


250 


288 


2516 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 5th Mdlsx 






















Blanks 


50 


71 


47 


66 


82 


62 


84 


67 


60 


589 


Paul F.X. Powers 


104 


136 


88 


95 


97 


105 


97 


82 


93 


897 


John R. Caswell 


96 


83 


115 


87 


131 


131 


140 


98 


134 


1015 


Write-in 





2 














3 


1 


1 


7 


Misc* 



250 



292 



250 



248 


3 
313 


3 
301 



324 


2 
250 



288 


8 


TOTAL 


2516 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 5th Mdlsx. 




















Blanks 


84 


101 


80 


94 


122 


98 


134 


95 


99 


907 


Joyce Kidd 


163 


187 


169 


149 


186 


200 


184 


152 


187 


1577 


Write-in 


2 


2 


1 


3 








6 


3 


1 


18 


Misc. * 


1 


2 





2 


5 


3 








1 


14 


TOTAL 


250 


292 


250 


248 


313 


301 


324 


250 


288 


2516 


TOWN COMMITTEE 






















Blanks 


4932 


6060 


4721 


5390 


6554 


6022 


6639 


5332 


5887 


51537 


Richard F. Burtt, Jr. 


127 


142 


131 


108 


141 


156 


154 


114 


127 


1200 



10 



Ivor K. Clements 
Carol C. Cleven 
Walter A. Cleven 
Judy L Cypret 
Leslie P. Cypret 
Frances S. Dejager 
Peter Dulchinos 
Eileen K. Fletcher 
Harry A. Foster 
John S. Fudge, Jr. 
Rita M. Gamache 
Francis X. Harrison, Sr. 
Janet B . Hendl 
John F. Ketcham 
Verton W. Lenfest 
William R. Logan 
Michael F. McCall 
Florence E. Morrison 
Halver P. Peterson 
Constance A. Pickard 
John B. Sousa, Jr. 
Jeffrey W. Stallard 
Josephine A. Tambo 
Nicholas Theochares 
Marguerite Waldron 
John T. Warren 
W. Matthew Whiting 
Robert F. Wood 
Margaret A. Fudge 
Bradford 0. Emerson 
Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Donna A. Johnson 
Linda Marinel 
Philip Currier 
Marion Currier 
Muriel McGann 
Colleen Pickard 
Write-in 
Misc. * 

TOTAL 



Pctl 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


Total 


120 


124 


122 


99 


132 


137 


146 


105 


127 


1112 


173 


190 


187 


161 


214 


225 


227 


163 


209 


1749 


141 


154 


148 


130 


167 


181 


176 


135 


157 


1389 


121 


131 


122 


101 


139 


136 


143 


103 


127 


1123 


118 


128 


119 


100 


137 


130 


140 


101 


128 


1101 


113 


127 


116 


104 


137 


135 


145 


104 


140 


1121 


126 


129 


148 


114 


152 


161 


169 


114 


138 


1251 


140 


152 


154 


119 


159 


174 


183 


129 


145 


1355 


135 


169 


147 


114 


139 


148 


151 


128 


134 


1265 


128 


129 


129 


117 


141 


149 


150 


109 


153 


1205 


128 


142 


136 


107 


144 


149 


159 


120 


138 


1223 


122 


126 


118 


98 


135 


135 


145 


98 


131 


1108 


123 


135 


148 


100 


144 


143 


155 


120 


129 


1197 


115 


126 


117 


101 


139 


143 


144 


105 


126 


1116 


116 


134 


121 


102 


137 


138 


143 


102 


126 


1119 


161 


169 


166 


131 


180 


192 


198 


147 


173 


1517 


117 


130 


131 


102 


136 


136 


145 


102 


126 


1125 


117 


124 


121 


101 


139 


136 


138 


103 


126 


1105 


119 


146 


140 


105 


139 


140 


150 


111 


133 


1183 


128 


131 


125 


103 


145 


152 


158 


111 


129 


1182 


125 


133 


127 


119 


141 


150 


145 


107 


132 


1179 


124 


158 


146 


107 


143 


140 


147 


114 


127 


1206 


118 


123 


126 


99 


146 


142 


159 


111 


147 


1171 


117 


131 


121 


100 


143 


134 


143 


98 


131 


1118 


117 


130 


140 


101 


142 


144 


158 


113 


131 


1176 


119 


127 


124 


109 


141 


142 


149 


104 


131 


1146 


125 


134 


134 


101 


143 


145 


153 


106 


129 


1170 


123 


123 


120 


102 


135 


139 


144 


104 


124 


1114 


136 


135 


135 


115 


157 


156 


150 


115 


162 


1261 


5 


4 


1 


2 


3 


7 


4 


4 


13 


43 


4 


7 


1 


6 





5 


3 


4 


10 


40 


4 


6 


1 


6 





5 


1 


4 


8 


35 


2 


6 


3 











3 


2 


2 


18 


4 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


2 


2 


10 


26 











2 








2 








4 


2 





1 








2 


1 


2 


8 


16 











2 


2 


2 


8 








14 


5 


4 


2 





8 


1 


10 


4 


6 


40 

































8750 10220 8750 8680 10955 10535 11340 8750 10080 88060 



INDEPENDENT VOTERS PARTY PRIMARY ELECTION MARCH 10, 1992 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 


Pctl 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


Total 


Robert J. Smith 


























1 


1 


Darcy G. Richardson . 
































Erik Thompson 
































Howard Phillips 

















1 











1 


Earl L. Dodge 
































J. Quinn Brisben 
































Michael S. Levinson 
































Bo Gritz 














1 








1 





2 


No Preference 





1 























1 


Andre Marron 




















1 








1 



11 





Pctl 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


Total 


All Others 
































Blanks 























1 





1 


TOTAL 





1 








1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


7 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 






















Write-in 
































All Others 























1 


1 


2 


Blanks 





1 








1 


1 


1 


1 





5 


TOTAL 





1 








1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


7 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 






















Write-in 
































All Others 























1 





1 


Blanks 





1 








1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


6 


TOTAL 





1 








1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


7 


TOWN COMMITTEE 






















All Others 























1 





1 


Blanks 





10 








10 


10 


10 


19 


10 


69 


TOTAL 





10 








10 


10 


10 


20 


10 


70 



12 



WARRANT FOR 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 

APRIL 7, 1992 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of 
the Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you 
are hereby requested to notify and warn the legal vot- 
ers of said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling 
places, VIZ: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Byam School Cafeteria 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Town Office Building Gymnasium 



On Tuesday, the 7th day of April, 1992 being the 
first Tuesday in said month at 10:00 a.m. until 8:00 
p.m. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years. 

Two members of School Committee for three 
years. 

Two members of Public Library Trustees for three 
years. 

One member of the Board of Health for three 
years. 

Two Planning Board members for three years. 

One member of Housing authority for five years. 

Two members of Sewer Commission for three 
years. 

One Constable for three years. 

One member of the Cemetery Commission for 
three years, 
and to vote on the following question: 

Question 1. THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford urge Representative 
Chester G. Atkins and the Senators Edward M. 



Kennedy and John F. Kerry to use their best efforts in 
the United States Congress to ensure that annual mili- 
tary budgets are progressively reduced by ten per cent 
a year until 1996 in order to provide essential funding 
for domestic needs including health care, affordable 
housing, job opportunities in peacetime industries, 
education, protection of the environment, and reduc- 
tion of the national debt? 

YES 

NO 

Fifty-four Representative Town Meeting members; 
six representatives per precinct. 

One Representative Town Meeting Member for an 
unexpired two year term in Precinct 3. 

Two Representative Town Meeting Members for 
an unexpired one year term in Precinct 4. 

One Representative Town Meeting Member for an 
unexpired two year term in Precinct 7. 

The polls will be open from 10:00 a.m. until 8:00 
p.m.; and to meet in the Parker School Cafetorium on 
Monday, the twenty-seventh day of April, at 7:30 
p.m. in the evening, then and there to act upon the 
following articles, VIZ: 

Article 1. To hear reports of the Town Officers and 
Committees; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Home Rule Charter under Part III, section 
3-2 (c), Board of Selectmen Appointment Powers, by 
deleting the following: 

" (c) Appointment Powers 

The board of selectmen shall appoint a town 
manager, a town counsel, a town accountant, and 
a board of registrars of voters (but not including 
the town clerk). The board of selectmen shall also 
appoint such other multiple member bodies as 
may be provided by by-law. " 

and add the following as Part III, Section 3-2 (c): 

"(c) The board of selectmen shall appoint a town 
manager, a town counsel, a town accountant, and 
a board of registrars of voters (but not including 
the town clerk) . The board of selectmen shall also 
appoint such policy making or policy advisory 
committees as they deem necessary, licensing 
committees, and such other multiple member 
bodies as may be provided by by-law. " 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



13 



Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a 
certain sum of money from the sale of Graves and 
Lots to the Cemetery Improvement and Development 
Fund; or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, to enter into compensatory balance 
agreements, during Fiscal Year 1993, as permitted by 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53F; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money with which to meet bills from previous 
years; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Section 12 of Chapter 188 of the Acts of 
1985, the School Improvement Act, in relation to the 
Equal Educational Opportunity Grant in the amount 
of $17,207.00 for the Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School for the 1991-92 School Year; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School District Committee 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5, 
Thirty Seventh A, relative to the exemption of certain 
real estate from taxation; such acceptance to be effec- 
tive for fiscal year 1993; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Assessors 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be deter- 
mined, to convey and transfer, all right, title and 
interest, if any, held by the Town, in a certain parcel 
of land, located on Shore Drive, and shown on Asses- 
sors' Map as Lot 15. Containing 5,000 square feet of 
land, more or less, all in compliance with the Uni- 
form Procurement Act, M.G.L. Chapter 30B; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
following mentioned streets, as laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen and shown by their reports duly filed in 
the office of the Town Clerk: 

1 . Boardwalk 

2. Burton Lane 



3. Pennsylvania Avenue 

4. Waterford Place 

5. Braeburn Road 

6. Purcell Drive 

7. Thornton Lane 

8. Meehan Drive 

Providing all the construction of the same meets 
with the requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and 
subject to the withholding of any remaining bonds 
until such requirements have been met; and to see if 
the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to acquire any and all temporary and/or perma- 
nent easements, and any property in fee simple, with 
trees thereon, by purchase, eminent domain, or oth- 
erwise, for the purpose of securing traffic safety and 
road improvements, and to see if the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate, transfer and appropriate 
from the Stabilization Fund, and/or borrow a certain 
sum of money to defray all necessary costs, fees and 
expenses in connection with the acquisition of said 
land and for paying any damages which may be 
awarded as a result of any such taking; and to see if 
the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to negotiate and execute all necessary and 
proper contracts and agreements thereto; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, 
Section 53 E 1/2, "Cities and Towns Authorized to 
Use Revolving Accounts"; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a 
certain sum of money from Sewer Betterments, Spe- 
cial Revenue, to reduce the exempt portion of debt 
and interest in the Fiscal Year 1993 Budget; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Sewer Commission 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a 
certain sum of money from the Stabilization Fund to 
offset debt and interest in the Fiscal Year 1993 Bud- 
get; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Manager 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of money as may be required 
to defray Town charges for the fiscal period July 1, 
1992 to June 30, 1993; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Manager 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds a certain 



14 



sum of money for the purpose of providing Senior 
Citizen Real Estate Tax Payment Vouchers for services 
rendered, pursuant to an agreement to be formulated 
by the Council on Aging and approved by the Town 
manager; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Manager 
Council on Aging 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be used as a Reserve Fund at the 
discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in 
General Laws Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Finance Committee 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
a certain sum of money for the following capital pro- 
jects: 

Cemetery Truck 22 , 000 . 00 
Data Processing Hardware & Software 100,000.00 

DPW Road Resurfacing 200 , 000 . 00 

DPW Middlesex Street Canal Deck 60,000.00 

DPW Sidewalk Construction 200 , 000 . 00 

DPW Streetlights 235,317.00 

Fire Breathing Apparatus 1 , 000 . 00 

Fire Ramp Repaving Eng. 3, 4, 5 15,000.00 

Police Portable Radios 25 , 000 . 00 

Police Cruisers 64 , 000 . 00 

School CHS Ext Stairs 12,000.00 

School Parker Roof Repairs 1 1 , 000 . 00 

School CHS Gym Divider 10,000.00 

School CHS Gym Floor 50 , 000 . 00 

School CHS Lavatory Partition 1 , 000 . 00 

School McCarthy Fire Alarms 30 , 000 . 00 

School Interior Maintenance 15,000.00 

School Stadium Seats/Press Box 30,000.00 

HVAC Upgrades 51,029.00 

TOTAL $1,249,346.00 

and to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
transfer and appropriate from the stabilization fund, 
and/or borrow a certain sum of money to fund these 
obligations; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Town Manager 

Capital Planning Committee 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds, a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of funding the sand 
lease approved by the Town under Article 12 of the 
1989 Annual Town Meeting; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer and appropriate from avail- 
able funds, a certain sum of money to engage a pri- 
vate accounting firm to prepare an audit of all 
accounts in all departments in the Town of Chelms- 
ford; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Assessors to issue a certain amount of 
money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduc- 
tion of the tax rate; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon at the time and place of 
said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 5th day of march 
A.D., 1992. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

William R. Logan, Vice Chairman 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Clerk 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Roger A. Blomgren 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS 



March 17, 1992 



Pursuant to the within warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: Town Office Building Gym, Harrington 
School Gymnasium, Harrington School Gymnasium, 
Westland School Cafeteria, Byam School Cafetorium, 
Westland School Cafeteria, McCarthy Middle School 
Small Gymnasium, McCarthy Middle School Small 
Gymnasium, and Town Office Building Gym, and 
Town Office Building Lobby. 

Signed: 
William E. Spence, Constable 

A True Copy Attest, 
William E. Spence, Constable 



15 



TOWN ELECTION APRIL 7, 1992 



'indicates candidates for re-election 
OFFICES AND CANDIDATES 





Pctl 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


Pet 4 


Pet 5 


Pet 6 


Pet 7 


Pet 8 


Pet 9 


Total 


SELECTMEN 3 Year Terms (2) 






















Blanks 


130 


168 


108 


169 


173 


141 


150 


153 


110 


1302 


Robert P. Joyce 


272 


136 


129 


190 


242 


192 


193 


160 


235 


1749 


William F. Dalton 


154 


202 


117 


183 


177 


136 


131 


222 


96 


1418 


Peter V. Lawlor 


277 


221 


335 


299 


377 


457 


408 


265 


308 


2947 


Jeffrey A. Brem 


240 


217 


231 


306 


247 


342 


273 


188 


241 


2285 


John C. Ferreira, Jr. 


62 


51 


32 


145 


71 


45 


65 


50 


40 


561 


Jeffrey W. Stallard 


41 


151 


66 


39 


54 


36 


33 


101 


44 


565 


Wayne D. Richardson 


33 


17 


12 


47 


101 


16 


28 


34 


48 


336 


Christine A. Gleason 


198 


203 


260 


179 


241 


195 


229 


190 


184 


1879 


Write-In 


1 








1 


2 





2 


4 





10 


Misc 














1 





2 


1 





4 


TOTAL 


1408 


1366 


1290 


1558 


1686 


1560 


1514 


1368 


1306 


13056 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 3 Year Terms (2) 

Blanks 494 

Carl A. Olsson* 466 

Wendy C. Marcks* 435 

Write-In 12 

Misc 1 
TOTAL 



500 


395 


546 


552 


524 


485 


476 


422 


4394 


457 


448 


539 


562 


557 


521 


457 


435 


4442 


404 


443 


461 


563 


475 


498 


423 


442 


4144 





1 


9 


3 


2 


8 


6 


4 


45 


5 


3 


3 


6 


2 


2 


6 


3 


31 



1408 1366 1290 1558 1686 1560 1514 1368 1306 13056 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE 3 Year Terms (2) 

Blanks 

Susan G. Koeckhoven 

Jaclyn Dolan Matzkin 

Sarah L. Warner* 

Write-In 

Misc 

TOTAL 



404 
418 
184 
399 
2 
1 



435 
254 
342 
333 

2 



328 
329 
267 
366 





492 
394 
241 
429 

2 



497 
459 
268 
461 

1 



443 
438 
223 
452 
3 
1 



1408 1366 1290 1558 1686 1560 



329 3775 

405 3460 

178 2178 

392 3625 

1 7 

_i _n 

"1514 1368 1306 13056 



437 
425 
217 
432 

3 



410 
338 
258 
361 
1 




BOARD OF HEALTH 3 Year Term (1) 

Blanks 247 220 188 254 283 235 238 227 220 2112 

Paul J. Canniff* 451 460 455 522 558 541 514 453 428 4382 

Write-In 4 1 2 1 1 3 2 14 

Misc 2 2 2 1 1 3 2 4 3 _20 

TOTAL 704 683 645 779 843 780 757 684 653 6528 



PLANNING BOARD 3 Year Terms (2) 

Blanks 

James M. Creegan 

John F. McCarthy* 

Michael F. McCall 

Christian S. Zousas 

Richard P. McClure 

Patricia Grant 

Write-In 

Misc 

TOTAL 



2787 

2417 

2208 

1864 

1482 

1013 

1273 

7 

_5 

1408 1366 1290 1558 1686 1560 1514 1368 1306 13056 



310 
256 
212 
176 
182 
151 
119 

2 



320 

190 

239 

242 

124 

85 

165 



1 



277 

206 

212 

239 

134 

85 

139 

1 





363 
265 
262 
203 
143 
176 
145 
1 




370 

360 

249 

196 

279 

91 

140 

1 





315 
351 
297 
180 
137 
126 
153 
1 




286 

283 

291 

286 

161 

99 

105 

1 

2 



308 

247 

225 

180 

126 

89 

191 

2 





238 
259 
221 
162 
196 
111 
119 





16 



Pctl 
HOUSING AUTHORITY 5 Year Term (1) 

Blanks 120 

Lynn M. Marcella* 397 

Daniel J. Sadkowski 185 

Write-In 2 

Misc 

TOTAL 704 



Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Total 



115 

299 

268 



1 



114 

379 

152 







125 
458 
195 


1 



172 

446 

223 

1 

1 



137 

473 

166 

1 

3 



150 

449 

156 

2 





113 

338 

232 



1 



105 

402 

146 







683 



645 



779 



843 



780 



757 



684 



1151 

3641 

1723 

6 

_7 

"653 6528 



SEWER COMMISSION 3 Year Terms 






















Blanks 


376 


385 


329 


434 


488 


395 


416 


386 


282 


3491 


Jacob P. Sartz III 


210 


200 


224 


297 


262 


235 


247 


227 


231 


2133 


John P. Emerson, Jr.* 


368 


403 


358 


399 


440 


471 


417 


367 


362 


3585 


Barry B. Balan 


450 


376 


379 


426 


496 


456 


434 


387 


428 


3832 


Write-In 


3 


1 





1 





3 








1 


9 


Misc 


1 


1 





1 











1 


2 


6 


TOTAL 


1408 


1366 


1290 


1558 


1686 


1560 


1514 


1368 


1306 


13056 


CONSTABLE 3 Year Term (1) 






















Blanks 


125 


114 


93 


132 


167 


140 


123 


120 


110 


1124 


William Spence' 


374 


343 


285 


452 


413 


421 


382 


321 


328 


3329 


Robert Hohmann 


204 


225 


255 


194 


262 


216 


252 


242 


214 


2064 


Write-In 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 





1 


1 


11 


TOTAL 


704 


683 


645 


779 


843 


780 


757 


684 


653 


6528 


CEMETERY COMMISSION 3 Year Term (1) 




















Blanks 


247 


218 


206 


248 


285 


255 


258 


219 


220 


2156 


Gerald L. Hardy* 


447 


464 


436 


527 


552 


522 


495 


461 


430 


4334 


Write-In 


9 


1 





2 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


24 


Misc 


1 





3 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


14 


TOTAL 


704 


683 


645 


779 


843 


780 


757 


684 


653 


6528 


QUESTION 1 






















Blanks 


131 


125 


81 


134 


129 


142 


146 


106 


99 


1093 


YES 


403 


398 


372 


475 


481 


434 


378 


420 


364 


3725 


NO 


170 


160 


192 


170 


233 


204 


233 


158 


190 


1710 


TOTAL 


704 


683 


645 


779 


843 


780 


757 


684 


653 


6528 



REPRESENTATIVE TOWN MEMBERS 3 Year Term (unless specified) 



PREC. 1 (6) 


TOTAL 


PREC. 2 (6) 


TOTAL 


PREC. 3 (6) 


TOTAL 


Blanks 


1810 


Blanks 


1408 


Blanks 


1429 


Carl W. SeideT 


379 


Bonnie I. Foster* 


366 


William F. Tucker 


251 


Marian D. Currier* 


364 


Donna J.K. Cooper 


177 


Christine A. Gleason* 


406 


Scott J. McCaig* 


334 


George F. Abely' 


392 


Katherine C. Harbison 


304 


John G. Coppinger' 


358 


Wanda L. Dunn 


190 


Michael F. Curran' 


347 


Fotine Alexis McCarthy 


268 


Loretta A. Gelenian* 


259 


Peter Dulchinos 


263 


Paul F. McCarthy 


332 


Susan E. Carter 


184 


John P. Emerson, Jr. 


268 


Phillip L. Currier' 


364 


Barry T. Bell* 


331 


Judith Haas* 


328 


Write-In 


13 


Jesse C. Foster 


290 


Jonathan C. Stubbs 


274 


Misc. 


2 


Douglas L. Wright 


289 


Write-In 





TOTAL 


4224 


Kathryn M. Fisher 


200 


Misc 









Write-in 


10 


TOTAL 


3870 






Misc 


2 










TOTAL 


4098 







17 



REPRESENTATIVE TOWN MEETING MEM- 
BER for Unexpired 2 Year Term 

TOTAL 
Blanks 222 

Francis J. Miethe 422 

Write-In 

Misc 1 

TOTAL 645 



write-in candidate 

PREC. 4 (6) TOTAL 

Blanks 2377 

Lynn M. Marcella* 461 

Robert L. Hughes' 405 

Jeffrey A. Brem' 499 

Linda J. Allen* 418 

Frances T. McDougalT 395 

Write-In 20 

Misc 11 

Arthur J. Moores' 88 

TOTAL 4674 



PREC. 5 (6) TOTAL 

Blanks 2375 

Stephen J. Mallette 497 

Evelyn S. Thoren* 428 

Ronald W. Wetmore* 448 

Glenn R. Thoren* 398 

Dean Carmeris* 425 

Karen I. Braunschweiger 473 

Write-In 12 

Misc 2 

TOTAL 5058 



PREC 6 (6) TOTAL 

Blanks 1997 

Carol Lynn Bacon 456 

David J. McLachlan* 445 

Roger A. Blomgren* 473 

Cheryl M. Warshafsky* 401 

Edward S. Marshall* 439 

Martin A. Gruber* 445 

Write-In 24 

Misc 

4680 



REPRESENTATIVE TOWN MEETING 
MEMBER for Unexpired 1 Year Terms (2) 

TOTAL 



Blanks 


651 










Ralph M. Nebalski 


419 










Arthur W. Blomgren 


462 










Write-In 


24 










Misc 


2 










TOTAL 


1558 










PREC. 7 (6) 


TOTAL 


PREC. 8 (6) 


TOTAL 


PREC. 9 (6) 


TOTAL 


Blanks 


2550 


Blanks 


1946 


Blanks 


1597 


Leonard W. Doolan III* 


424 


Adrienne M. Jerome 


317 


Henry T. Emmett 


336 


Kathryn Brough* 


391 


Christopher J. Luppi 


288 


Charles A. Piper* 


350 


Dwight M. Hayward* 


406 


Shawn M. Kraft 


253 


Donald L. Elias* 


317 


Andrew V. Silinsh* 


364 


Daniel W. Burke' 


352 


Alan L. Moyer* 


334 


Beyla Makovsky 


346 


Francis M. Conlin 


299 


Barbara J. Scavezze* 


348 


Write-In 


61 


Stanley W. Norkunas* 


258 


James P. Good* 


337 


Misc 





Diane Lewis 


284 


C. Thomas Christiano 


270 


TOTAL 


4542 


Write-In 


5 


Write-In 


16 






Misc 


2 


Misc 


12 






TOTAL 


4104 


TOTAL 


3918 


REPRESENTATIVE TOWN MEETING 










MEMBER for Unexpired 


2 Year Term 

TOTAL 










Blanks 


309 










Jocelyn G.T. Anthony 


441 










Write-In 


7 










Misc 













TOTAL 


757 











18 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 27, 1992 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 
the Parker School Cafetorium at 7:45 p.m. by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 144 Town Meeting 
Representatives present. 

The Moderator made some procedural announce- 
ments. He pointed out the fire exits. Also all Repre- 
sentatives should have received when checking in, the 
new town Meeting by-laws. The Moderator's rules 
and recommendations were also available to the 
newly elected Representatives. He then announced 
that Thursday, April 29th was going to be the Annual 
Student Government day at the High School. He read 
the list of students participating and the offices that 
they would be holding. 



SELECTMEN 
Aaron Bates 
Matthew Doyon 
Erin Ready, Chairperson 
Andy Rubenstein 
Mike Sablone 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Michelle Brissette 
Jen Mara 
Jeff Metivier 
Jill Moloney 
Lori Sandler 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Jeff Cancella 
Jeff Cantara 
Heather Mahon 

PLANNING BOARD 
Michelle Dery 
Kelly Gleason 
Peter Kalpas 

STATE SENATOR 
Edwin Jeremy Quimby 



WIRING INSPECTOR 
Ted Crane 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Steven Beaucher 



DPW DIRECTOR/ENGINEER 
Elizabeth Palm 

SUPERINTENDENT OF 

SCHOOLS 

Tracy Sullivan 

SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
Joseph Balan 
Andrew Booth 
Timothy Gonsalves 

TOWN MANAGER 
Renne Couture 



BOARD OF HEALTH 
Kim Baker 
Stacy Keane 
Lindsay Wells 

CEMETERY SUPERINTENDENT 
Robert Luhrs 



CEMETERY COMMISSION TOWN CONSTABLE 



Christopher Avery 
Mathew Gannon 
Christopher Maiile 

TOWN CLERK 
Kate Petersen 



Rick Sachetti 



SUPERINTENDENT OF 

STREETS 

Daniel Nakamoto 



SUPERINTENDENT OF 

BUILDINGS 

Derek Warshafsky 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Lynne Adams 
Matthew Amerson 
John Holladay 
Amy Milinazzo 

LIBRARY TRUSTEE 
Jackelyn May 
Michelle McCuller 
Jennifer Pattison 

POLICE CHIEF 
Thomas Harrington 

FIRE CHIEF 
Alicia Goldman 



TREASURER/TAX 
COLLECTOR 
Jennifer Cyrkler 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Steve McNally 



TOWN MODERATOR 
Chris Parke 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Amy Graig 
Leah Goldman 
Paula Makarewicz 
Djwan Scott 

COUNCIL ON AGING 
DIRECTOR 



Gradon Tripp 



ASS'T POLICE CHIEF 
Marybeth Feeney 

ASS'T FIRE CHIEF 
Mike Moriarty 

VETERANS' AGENT 
Karen Rafferty 



STATE REPRESENTATIVE 
Brandon Young 



A round of applause followed the announcement. 

The Moderator then read his recommendations 
on the procedures of conduct for Town Meeting. 

Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved that the read- 
ing of the Constable's return of service and posting of 
the warrant be waived. It was so voted unanimously, 
by a show of hands. 

Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved that the read- 
ing of the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted 
unanimously, by show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to hear the reports of the 
Town Officers and Committees. 

The Moderator explained that the only committee 
report to be heard was that of the Stipends and Bene- 
fits Committee. This committee was formed as the 
result of Article 5 of the October 21, 1991 Town 
Meeting. The Committee was comprised of one mem- 
ber from each precinct. Its purpose was to investigate 
the Town's stipend structure and benefit laws, and 
report the findings at the next Annual Meeting. 

Dean Carmeris, Chairman of the Committee gave 
the committee's report. The Committee's purpose was 
to study the issue of benefits available to elected and 
appointed officials who receive a stipend. The tradi- 
tion of paying stipends in some cases goes back to at 
least 100 years. The Finance Committee raised the 



19 



issue by submitting an article at the October meeting, 
and the body voted to appoint a committee to further 
study the situation. They reviewed only the insurance 
benefits issued to appointed and elected Town Offi- 
cials. No other employees, or compensation was con- 
sidered. The Committee gathered information from 
surrounding cities and towns that compared to 
Chelmsford in size and type of Government. He 
spoke to the personnel who presently administer the 
benefits, and discussed all the information at hand 
and as a result have submitted Article 10 of the Spe- 
cial Town Meeting scheduled for this evening. 

He went on with a brief history of the benefits. In 
1961 the Town voted to accept Chapter 32B of the 
M.G.L. This would allow the Town to provide certain 
benefits for certain people in service with the Town. 
Anyone receiving a stipend would be eligible to 
receive benefits. Presently these employees may par- 
ticipate in a medical health plan, which costs the 
Town $4,250 per family plan. They are eligible for a 
$5,000. term life insurance plan, which costs the 
Town $42.00 per person, and they are allowed 
optional enrollment in the pension plan. After ten 
years of continuous service, if the person retires, 
he/she is eligible for continued medical and life insur- 
ance benefits. In the event of death, the spouse of 
this person is also guaranteed continued coverage, if 
on the medical plan at the time. 

A discussion took place. William Spence ques- 
tioned why he did not receive any type of question- 
naire in order to submit his views about the situation. 
Dean Carmeris said that the committee felt that due 
to a member being one of the officials who did partic- 
ipate in the health plan, those views would be repre- 
sented. Mark Gauthier came forward and said that at 
the December meeting he requested the Committee to 
contact any and all officials who were receiving the 
benefits so that they may express their concerns, 
however, the committee felt this step need not be 
done since the majority was against stipends. Andrew 
Silinish questioned if the benefits could be dropped 
after a person was elected or appointed, and their 
term of office was not up yet? According to the Town 
Manager and council, this could be done. Any pre- 
sent retired official would continue to receive the ben- 
efits if Article 10 passes. The Moderator reminded the 
body that this was only a report, any debate and fur- 
ther discussion should take place under the actual 
article. He then asked for a show of hands to accept 
the report as presented. Motion carried. 

The Moderator made a point of order. The 
Annual Town Meeting was going to be adjourned at 
this time, in order to take up the Special Town Meet- 
ing which was posted for 7:30 p.m. At the conclusion 
of the Special Town Meeting, he will reconvene the 
Annual Town Meeting. 

Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved to adjourn the 



Annual Town Meeting in order to proceed with the 
posted Special Meeting. The Finance Committee and 
the Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion. 
The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried. The Annual Meeting was 
adjourned at 8:10 p.m. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 27, 1992 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 
the Parker School Cafetorium at 8:10 p.m. by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 144 Town Meeting 
Representatives present. 

The Moderator then asked permission from the 
Town Meeting body to allow certain people to speak 
when necessary. These people were non-residents and 
either represented certain parties in some of the 
upcoming articles, or would have information needed 
for discussion. He listed those people: 

For Article 5, Jim Mawn and Paul Davis. For Arti- 
cle 9, Drew Leff, Barbara Housman Carye, Dean Skiff 
and Joseph Spanos. For Article 11, Edna Boyle, Paul 
Goss, Malea Hughes, Hank Sherman and Janine 
Ward. The Moderator asked for a vote by a show of 
hands, motion carried. 

Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved that the read- 
ing of the Constable's return of service and posting of 
the warrant be waived. It was so voted unanimously, 
by a show of hands. 

Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved that the read- 
ing of the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted 
unanimously, by show of hands. 

Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved to take Article 
2 out of order. Selectman William R. Logan explained 
that the Board of Selectmen wanted to take Article 2 
out of order, and have it be acted upon before Article 
1. The Board wanted to know the outcome of the 
proposed by-law change, prior to voting on the over- 
ride question. The Finance Committee was in favor of 
the proposed motion. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion, so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman William R. Logan 
explained that this article would protect the monies 
voted on for the 2Vi override for solid waste. The 
monies could only be used for solid waste and not for 
any other department's budget. The Finance Commit- 
tee was in favor of the article. 

Joel Karp moved to amend the article by deleting 
the paragraph shown and inserting in its place the fol- 
lowing wording: 



20 



A: In the event that funding for any or all solid 
waste programs are derived from a Proposi- 
tion 2Vi override, then those funds shall be 
exclusively used for such services for fiscal 
year initially authorized for and all future 
years. 

The Town Manager shall, when presenting a bud- 
get to Town Meeting, specifically account for such 
funds. 

In the event that Town Meeting shall fail to 
appropriate all or any part of the funds for such ser- 
vices, the unused amount of the Proposition override 
shall not be raised nor shall it be used for any other 
purpose. 

B: Any and all funds received by the Town from 
the sale of materials collected and or mar- 
keted through any of the solid waste pro- 
grams shall be used only for the purposes 
contained in this by-law. 

Joel Karp explained that this would definitely lock 
any override monies specified for solid waste only to 
be used in that budget, it could not be used for any 
other purposes. Any monies raised through the solid 
waste program would be put back into the solid waste 
program. 

This article guaranteed that no other budgets 
could take any funds from the trash budget. Bernard 
Ready wanted to know what provisions would be 
made to guarantee that any increased cost for trash 
won't be taken out of other departmental budgets? 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that 
most likely the cost per ton will increase after three 
years. The contract beginning July 1st, reflects a cost 
of $45.00 per ton. The previous contract was $76.00 
per ton. The Town is only allowed to increase the tax 
levy by 272% each year. If in three years the contract 
does increase back to the $76.00 per ton, then there 
would not be enough money raised to cover costs. 
The difference will be made up from either available 
funds within other budgets or go back to the voters 
with an override requesting the additional funds. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Commit- 
tee's recommendation on the motion to amend. The 
Finance Committee recommends the article. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion to 
amend. Discussion took place. 

Barbara Scavezze, moved to amend the amend- 
ment by adding after the first paragraph, "All such 
Solid Waste Programs shall include service to all single 
family residences and all multi-family complexes." 
She explained that the override includes funding for 
the multi-family complexes, and after meeting with 
the people who lived in these complexes, they wanted 



to be guaranteed that their trash would be picked up 
by the Town if the override passes. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance and Select- 
men's recommendation on the motion to amend, 
both boards were in favor. He then asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands on the motion to amend 
the amendment, motion carried. 

Bernard Ready moved to amend the amendment 
by adding: 

"C. Any money raised and appropriated for solid 
waste programs shall come from a Proposition 
272 override, or collected from solid waste 
fees." 

He felt that if more money is needed in the future 
then it would be funded only through an override, or 
fees and not by cutting any other budget. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Commit- 
tee's recommendation. The Board did not have one at 
the present time. He then asked for the Selectmen's 
recommendation. The Board felt that it would hinder 
both the Town Meeting and the town manager with 
the budget process and does not support the motion. 
After reviewing the motion, Town Counsel James 
Harrington ruled the motion out of order. It would 
control future town meetings and the action that 
could be taken. 

More discussion took place. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on the motion to amend. Motion 
carried. He asked if there was any need for discussion 
on the motion as amended. Barbara Scavezze said 
that the Solid Waste Committee supported the 
motion. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion to amend. Motion carried. The article 
reads as follows: 

Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved that the Town 
vote to amend the General By-laws Article VIII Waste 
Disposal, Section 8. Solid Waste Recycling, and Haz- 
ardous Waste Disposal Programs, Subsection 8.4 by 
adding the following paragraphs. 

A: In the event that funding for any or all solid 
waste programs are derived from a Proposi- 
tion 27 override, then those funds shall be 
exclusively used for such services for fiscal 
year initially authorized for and all future 
years. All such Solid Waste Programs shall 
include service to all single family residences 
and all multi- family complexes. 

The Town Manager shall, when presenting a bud- 
get to Town Meeting, specifically account for such 
funds. 

In the event that Town Meeting shall fail to 



21 



appropriate all or any part of the funds for such ser- 
vices, the unused amount of the Proposition override 
shall not be raised nor shall it be used for any other 
purpose. 

B. Any and all funds received by the Town from 
the sale of materials collected and or mar- 
keted through any of the solid waste pro- 
grams shall be used only for the purposes 
contained in this by-law. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to support the Ballot ques- 
tion seeking approval of an override of Proposition 2% 
for the purpose of funding Municipal Household Solid 
Waste/Recyclable Collection for all Single Family 
Homes and all Multifamily Residences. 

Chairman of the Board of Health, Mark Gauthier 
explained why the override is necessary. The follow 
up cost factor involved with the present bag and tag 
system is extremely high. He stated that throughout 
the town, illegal dumping was going on. Private 
dumpsters, roadsides, open areas were all subject to 
the abuse. The Board of Health, and the Town Man- 
ager's office have received numerous complaints. In 
some cases the area has been a health issue. He indi- 
cated that a display of pictures had been set up in the 
hall showing the different sites and amount of trash 
the Board of Health had recently been involved in 
picking up. The possibility of contacting Hepatitis B is 
of great concern. A staff member of the Board of 
Health had contacted Hepatitis B and it was felt that 
it was a result of removing illegal trash. The Board of 
Health reviewed the contents of the contract along 
with the members of the Solid Waste Committee and 
feel that the present health concerns will be addressed 
more satisfactory and at a lessor cost with the pro- 
posed bid, rather than the present bag and tag sys- 
tem. He urged for support of the override question 
which will appear on the May 27th Special Election. 
The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee was in 
favor of the article, and requested the Town Manager 
to make a presentation showing the cost factor 
involved. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch showed the break- 
down of the contract in the three year stages: 



Contracts 


Yr. 1 


Yr. 2 


Yr. 3 


Trash Collect Max. yrly 


447,088 


477,003 


498,519 


Disposal 


877,500 


936,000 


975,000 


19,500 tons 


($45/T) 


($48/T) 


($50/T) 


Recycling Max Annual 


286,365 


300,560 


311,891 


Leaves-3 collections 


15,000 


16,500 


18,000 


-Drop-Off- 


2,500 


3,000 


3,500 




$1,628,453 


$1,733,063 


$1,806,910 


Other (2.5% Inc. Yr) 








Leaves - Composting 


7,000 


7,175 


7,354 



Employee 10 hours/wkly 


6,000 


6,150 


6,304 


Flyer with postage 


3,000 


3,075 


3,152 


Christmas Tree Drop-Off 


1,000 


1,025 


1,051 




17,000 


17,425 


17,861 


TOTAL AMOUNT 








EACH YEAR 


$1,645,453 


$1,750,488 


$1,824,771 


existing municipal 


-85,000 


-91,110 


-95,754 


GRAND TOTAL 


$1,560,453 


$1,659,378 


$1,729,017 



The Town Manager then showed the cost break 
down per household with either system: 



Bill «& 


Tag System:** 














1 bag/wk 


2 bag/wk 


3 bag/wk 


4 bag/wk 


5 bag/wk 


1 Family 




$123.85 


$170.65 


$217.45 


$264.25 


$311.05 


M-Curb 




100.50 


147.30 


194.10 


240.90 


287.70 


M-Dump 




86.75.. 




same.. 







Override Approved: 

Standard Deduction on Income Taxes 



$100,000 
$150,000 
$200,000 



72.00 same. 

108.00 same. 

144.00 same. 



* *The Users Fees per household: 
Solid Waste Collection: 

Single Family 42.00 

Multi-Family/curbside 30.00 

Multi-Family/dumpster 25.00 



Plus 




Trash tags 


.90 


Dumpsters 


40.00/unit 


Bulk tags 


7.00 


Recycling: 




Single Family 


35.05 


Multi-family/curbside 


23.70 


Multi-family/dumpster 


21.75 



A discussion took place. Questions were asked 
and answered by the Town manager. Why was a spe- 
cial election being called. He explained the exact cost 
had to be decided and that the bids had gone out and 
weren't due in until a week after the Board of Select- 
men had met. The Board felt that the question should 
reflect the true cost needed for the override rather 
than estimate the cost and then be short or over the 
amount needed. A question was asked on how many 
households hadn't paid the user fees. There were at 
least 500. What guarantee was there that the present 
situation of illegal dumping would be taken care of? 
The Board of Selectmen felt that due to the fact that 
households won't have to deal with weekly stickers 
and the yearly user fee, that the trash would be put 
out legally each week at the curbside. Federal regula- 
tions regarding recycling will be the vendor's respon- 
sibility and not the Town's. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 



22 



support the motion. More discussion took place. John 
Emerson moved the question. The Moderator asked if 
there was a need for further discussion by way of a 
show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. He 
then asked for a show of hands on the article, motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Jeffrey A. Brem moved that 
the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Article 
VIII Waste Disposal, Section 8 Solid Waste, Recycling, 
and Hazardous Waste Disposal Programs, Subsection 
8.5 by adding the following paragraph: 

"Not withstanding the above, the Manager may 
negotiate contractual terms whereby the Town's 
selected contractor manages and administers the 
annual fee for the collection, transportation, and/or 
disposal or marketing of solid wastes and recyclables 
in which event fees may be made directly to the con- 
tractor and shall be accounted for under the terms of 
the contract." 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the arti- 
cle. This is to allow the vendor of the trash contract 
to administer a trash billing system, if need be. If the 
override passes this would not be necessary. The ven- 
dor's cost would be 85 cents per household. If the 
Town was to do the billing, the cost would be $2.50. 
The philosophy is that the vendor should bear the 
burden and the risk of charging for the service that 
they are providing. The Town would only pay for the 
disposal of the public waste. That is the figure that 
appears in the solid waste budget. The Finance Com- 
mittee and the Board of Selectmen recommends the 
article. 

Joel Karp question where does the money sit? He 
felt that the money being collected is town money, 
for a town program. Under state law all town money 
must be given to the Treasurer of the town, who shall 
deposit it into a bank, and make suitable investments. 
He didn't mind that the billing was being done by the 
vendor, as long as the money is accounted for and 
insured. He then moved to amend the article, by 
deleting it and having the following wording: 

"Notwithstanding the above, the Town manager 
may negotiate contractual terms whereby the Town's 
selected contractor manages and administer the 
annual fee for the collection, transportation, and/or 
disposal or marketing of solid wastes and recyclables 
in which event fees may be made directly to the con- 
tractor and shall be accounted for under the terms of 
the contract. Such funds that remain in the contrac- 
tor's control and/or custody shall be fully collateral- 
ized, insured or backed by a surety bond to full 
amount of such funds. Such collateral, insurance or 
surety bond shall be in addition to any performance 
or similar bond required in accordance with statutory 
requirements, town by-law or policies established by 
the Town Meeting, Board of Selectmen, Town Trea- 



surer or Town Manager. 

The Contractor shall account for such funds on a 
monthly basis to the Town Treasurer." 

Joel Karp explained the purpose. If the town 
decided to leave the money with the contractor then 
the town would have a bond so that the money 
would be assured. This is known as a surety bond, 
which is different from a performance bond. If the 
contractor doesn't go out and pick up the trash and 
the town has to find another vendor to pick up the 
trash then the provisions of the performance bond is 
applied. However, if the money is not accounted for, 
or embezzled or the vendor goes out of business then 
the provisions of a surety bond would apply. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's recom- 
mendation. The Finance Committee wanted to hear 
Town Counsel's opinion. Town Counsel James Har- 
rington said that there was no problem with the 
motion to amend, but the decision of negotiating a 
contract to included a surety bond or performance 
bond is the decision of the Town Manager, it does 
not require a by-law to do this. The Finance Commit- 
tee supported the motion because it makes good busi- 
ness sense. Ed Hilliard questioned if the new contract 
would have to be re-negotiated to include a surety 
bond? The Town Manager explained that the specifi- 
cations were to provide a performance bond which he 
felt was adequate. Any changes in the initial bonding 
would not be allowed and the town would have to 
assume the cost of the bond. Ed Hilliard asked if it 
would then make sense to leave the money in the 
treasury and pay out to the contractor as he per- 
forms? The Town Manager explained this would not 
save the town money because the administration costs 
of the bid would not be utilized which was part of the 
town's savings. Ed Hilliard asked if perhaps this 
whole matter should be tabled until the next meeting, 
and in the meantime the additional costs could be fig- 
ured out and reported back? The Town Manager 
asked that the original article be passed as presented 
and that he would check with the vendor to see if a 
surety bond could be obtained even though again he 
felt that the performance bond was adequate. More 
discussion took place. The Moderator asked for the 
Board of Selectmen's recommendation on the motion 
to amend. The majority of the Board was not in favor 
due to the possibility of costing more money. More 
discussion took place. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to amend. Motion 
defeated. He then asked if there was any need for fur- 
ther discussion. Hearing none, the Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on the article as originally pre- 
sented, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 John P. Emerson, Jr., Chair- 
man of the Sewer Commission, moved that the Town 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the 
Sewer Commissioners to acquire any and all tempo- 
rary and/or permanent easements, and any property 



23 



in fee simple with the buildings and trees thereon by 
purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, for the 
property located in the Town of Chelmsford, Massa- 
chusetts, and further described and shown on a set of 
plans entitled "Plan of Sewer Easements in Chelms- 
ford, Massachusetts, Phase IIC Sewers" Dated January 
31, 1992 prepared for the Chelmsford Sewer Commis- 
sion by Richard F. Kaminski & Associates, Inc., a 
copy of which is on file in the office of the Town 
Engineer and Town Clerk and is incorporated herein 
by reference, for the purpose of constructing and 
maintaining sewers, pumping stations, and all other 
appurtenances thereto. 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John P. 
Emerson, Jr., explained that this was in conjunction 
with an override vote done in 1980. There was no 
money involved. Both the Finance Committee and 
the Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. 
The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Christine Gleason moved 
that the Town vote to amend the existing Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Map by removing the following 
described property on Littleton Road owned by 
C.L.M. Realty Trust, consisting of 1.68 acres and 
7,628 square feet of land with the buildings thereon 
from limited Industrial District (IA) and Residential 
District (RB) and placing all of said property in a 
General Commercial District (CD). 

Northerly by the southerly line of Littleton 

Road, 490.05 feet; 

Easterly by land now or formerly of Raymond 

T. Osborn, et al, 119.46 feet; 

Southerly by land now or formerly of the New 

York, New Haven, and Hartford Rail- 
road Company, 488.74 feet; 

Westerly by land now or formerly of Stephen 

W. Flannery, et al, 197.79 feet. 

All of said boundaries are determined by the Land 
Court to be located as shown on Plan 29525A drawn 
by Brooks, Jordan and Graves, Civil Engineers, dated 
July 23, 1959 as modified and approved by the Land 
Court, filed in the Land Registration Office, copy of a 
portion of which is filed with Certificate of Title 
11381. Property is also identified on the Board of 
Assessors Map 174 as Lot 31 and 32 which lots are 
now combined. 

Attorney James Geary who represented the Mawn 
Family explained where the location of the property 
was. The location was that of the former Chelmsford 
Ginger Ale plant. The Mawn family has owned this 
property for approximately the last thirty years. It 
involves two acres of land which is zoned presently 



for the most part (IA) Industrial District, and (RB) 
Residential. The Mawn family would like the entire 
piece to be rezoned (CD) Commercial District. If the 
body approves the rezoning, then the buildings 
involved would be removed, and a single story colo- 
nial office building would be built in its place. This 
would require two special permits from the Planning 
Board. One being a site plan detail review and the 
other a major business complex permit. The major 
business complex permit would require a traffic study 
input. In addition plans would be made to work with 
the neighbors concerning driveway locations etc. The 
days for a warehouse building being located in the 
center of town are gone and that this proposal would 
be more acceptable. Questions were asked concerning 
the traffic impact. Michael Anthony expressed con- 
cerns about losing the residential zone. It was the 
Building Inspector's recommendation to follow the 
actual property lines when rezoning. Ralph Hickey 
said that the proposed location would affect him, due 
to being located directly across from the property. He 
was in favor of the overall improvement, but still 
expressed his concerns of the effect of traffic and the 
entrance. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Commit- 
tee's recommendation. The Finance Committee rec- 
ommended the article. The Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for the 
Planning Board's recommendation. Chairman of the 
Planning Board, James Good read the Board's recom- 
mendation: 

The Planning Board held a public hearing on the 
above mentioned issue on February 26, 1992. At the 
meeting of March 11, 1992, they voted unanimously 
to recommend (6-0) a zoning change of the described 
property from Limited Industrial District (IA) and 
Residential District (RB) and placing all of said prop- 
erty in a General Commercial District (CD). 

Bernard Ready who is one of the directors of the 
Chelmsford Historical Society, said it was sad that 
this property would have to be torn down, however, 
it is an eye sore. He met with the architect and was 
assured that an historical information would be taken 
into consideration when designing. Either by saving 
the sign or possibly naming it Ginger Ale Park. He 
felt that with the present economy the town should 
support a business who wants to locate in town. He 
asked for support of the article. Andrew Silinish ques- 
tioned if this property couldn't be rented out then 
what would be accomplished if the owner requests 
tax breaks. James Geary stated that there were defi- 
nite tenants interested in this location. The Moderator 
attempted a vote by a show of hands which required 
a 2 /3's vote. The following tellers came forward and 
conducted a hand count. 

Result of the hand count: Yes 115 No 11, 2 A's is 
84, the motion carried. 



24 



UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved, that the Town vote to amend the General By- 
laws Article I. General Provisions Section 2 Non - 
Criminal Disposition of Violations of Any Ordinance, 
By-law, or Regulations of Any Municipal Officer, 
Board or Department by deleting the last paragraph 
which reads as follows in its entirety: 

"Any person notified to appear before the Clerk 
of a District herein before provided may so appear 
and confess the offense charged, either personally or 
through a duly authorized agent or by mailing to such 
clerk with the notice such specific sum of money not 
exceeding two hundred dollars as the town shall fix 
as penalty for violation of the ordinance, by-law, rule 
or regulation. Such payment shall, if mailed, be made 
only by postal note, money order or check. The pay- 
ment to the clerk of such sum shall operate as a final 
disposition of the case. An appearance under this 
paragraph shall not be deemed to be a criminal pro- 
ceeding. No person shall be required to report to any 
probation officer, and no record of the case shall be 
entered in any probation records. If any person so 
notified to appear desires to contest the violations 
alleged in the notice to appear, he may avail himself 
of the procedure established in Chapter 40, Section 
21D." 

and insert in its place the following: 

"Any person notified to appear before the Clerk 
of a District Court as herein before provided may so 
appear and confess the offense charged, either per- 
sonally or through a duly authorized agent or by 
mailing to the town clerk of the municipality within 
which the violation occurred together with the notice 
such specific sum of money not exceeding three hun- 
dred dollars as the town shall fix as penalty for viola- 
tion of the ordinance, by-law, rule or regulation. Such 
payment shall, if mailed, be made only by postal 
note, money order or check. Upon receipt of such 
notice, the town clerk shall forthwith notify the dis- 
trict court clerk of such payment and the receipt by 
the district court clerk of such notification shall oper- 
ate as a final disposition of the case. An appearance 
under this paragraph shall not be deemed to be a 
criminal proceeding. No person so notified to appear 
before the clerk of a district court shall be required to 
report to any probation officer, and no record of the 
case shall be entered in any probation records. If any 
person so notified to appear desires to contest the vio- 
lations alleged in the notice to appear, he may avail 
himself of the procedure established in Chapter 40, 
Section 2 ID." 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the 
purpose of the article is to administer any violations 
which occur in the Town. The money will be turned 
over to the Town Clerk rather than the court system. 
This would be a minimal change to the by-law which 
already exists. Edward Hilliard questioned the 



$200.00 figure vs. the $300.00, he felt this was more 
than a minimal change. The Town Manager explained 
that this is the exact wording of the state law. The 
Town can decide the fees of their own by-laws, but 
not state laws. The Moderator asked for the 
Finance and Selectmen's recommendation. Both 
Board's recommended the article. He then asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved to withdraw the article. Planning Board Chair- 
man James Good said that the Planning Board was 
notified on April 8th by Attorney Joseph Shanahan 
that the petitioner wanted to withdraw the article at 
this time. The Planning Board voted unanimously to 
support the request. The Board of Selectmen and the 
Finance Committee supported the motion. The Mod- 
erator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem, 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate 
from the insurance Sinking Fund the sum of 
$7,500.00 to pay deductible payments assessed against 
the Town under Town Insurance Policies. 

Selectman William R. Logan explained the article. 
The Finance Committee supported the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the reading of the article's description be 
waived. The Finance Committee supported the 
motion. The Board of Selectmen supported the 
motion. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. Attorney James Geary, 
representing the Carye Family who owned the prop- 
erty identified this as the Chelmsford Mall. He 
explained that this article was the same as the one 
presented at the fall meeting, the only significant 
change was that of the neighborhood concerns which 
was expressed by the representatives. Drew Leff gave 
a brief presentation showing the proposed changes. It 
was now considered a shopping center. In order to 
make the proposed improvements, the property must 
be refinanced. The present zoning makes the property 
non-conforming and this makes the process difficult. 
Other improvements would be a tenant mix, and in 
the future would be to add a restaurant, which is 
allowed in a CC zone but not the CA zone. Land- 
scaping and a new facade are being planned along 
with an expansion of 10%. The expansion is planned 
for the Bradley side of the mall. He asked for 
approval and feels that this would be a great benefit 
and improvement for the town. Once approved then 
a site plan review will be conducted by the Planning 
Board and more details will be presented. Ralph 
Nebalski questioned the traffic issue, and asked if a 
traffic study had been done. It was explained that it is 
mandatory for a traffic study to be done when apply- 



25 



ing for a special permit. A question was raised about 
the existing septic system and a restaurant being 
added. The mall has made application to be tied into 
the sewage system so that will not be a problem. 
More discussion took place. The Moderator asked for 
the Finance Committee's recommendation, the com- 
mittee was in favor of the motion. The Board of 
Selectmen supported the article. James Good, Chair- 
man of the Planning Board, read the Board's recom- 
mendation. 

The Planning Board held a Public Hearing on the 
above mentioned issue on February 26, 1992. At that 
meeting, they voted in favor to recommend (4-1) to 
Town Meeting a zoning change from Neighborhood 
Commercial District (CA) and Limited Industrial Dis- 
trict (IA) and place said property in a Shopping Cen- 
ter District (CO of the above described land. 

A number of representatives spoke in favor of the 
article. The Moderator attempted a vote by way of a 
show of hands, it left the Chair in doubt. The tellers 
came forward and conducted a hand count. 

The result of the hand count: Yes 123 No 2, 2 /3's 
is 83, motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Christine Gleason of the Planning Board, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the existing Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Map by removing the following 
described property consisting of 28.5 acres of land 
with buildings thereon from Neighborhood Commer- 
cial District (CA) and Limited Industrial District (IA) 
and placing said property in a Shopping Center Dis- 
trict (CO: 

Being a 28.5+ acre parcel of land situated in 
Chelmsford, MA more particularly described as 
follows: 

Commencing a point lying along the southerly 
R.O.W. Line of Chelmsford Road (Route 110), 
being a State Highway as laid out July 16, 1903 by 
the Massachusetts Highway Commission; said 
point being a stone bound and the "Point of 
Beginning" of the herein described parcel of land; 
thence running along said southerly R.O.W. line 
in a Southwesterly direction in 2 courses being; 
S82-17-00W, 844.61 feet to a point along a circu- 
lar curve concave to the left with an arc length of 
151.82 feet and radius of 656.80 feet to a point; 
thence S06-03-59E, 565.94 feet to a stone bound 
found; thence S80-37-34W, 56.97 feet to a point 
lying parallel and 50 feet East of the Easterly 
R.O.W. line of Manahan Street, being a 40' wide 
public way; thence S39-27-02E, 494.15 feet, along 
said parallel line of the Easterly R.O.W. line to a 
point lying at the intersection of the Southerly 
R.O.W. line of land now or formerly of the New 
York New Haven Railroad Co.; thence along said 
railroad R.O.W. line N68-17-04E, 354.84 feet to a 



point lying at the intersection of said Southerly 
Railroad R.O.W. line and the Northwesterly cor- 
ner of land now or formerly of Raymond Carye, 
being shown as Lot 4D on a plan of land pre- 
pared for Carex Realty Trust dated January 23, 
1989; thence running along Westerly lot line of 
said Lot 4D S21-42-56R, 170.00 feet, to a point 
being the Southwesterly lot corner of Lot 4D and 
the Northwestern corner of Lot 5A as shown on 
the herein referenced plan; thence running along 
the common property line of Lot 4D and 5A as 
referenced herein N73-14-24E, 250.00 feet and 
S45-47-33E, 85.87 feet to a point lying at the cen- 
ter line intersection of Katrina Road, a 50' wide 
public way, and the extension of said property 
line as shown on the herein referenced plan, 
thence running along the center line of said Kat- 
rina Road being a curved concave to the right 
having an arc length of 277.86 feet and a radius 
of 665.00 feet to a point; thence N52-20-29E, 
392.21 feet to a point lying at the center line 
intersection for said Katrina Road and the West- 
erly R.O.W. line of Glen Avenue, a public 40' 
R.O.W.; thence running a Northerly direction 
along said Westerly Glen Avenue R.O.W. in 2 
courses being N36-52-48W, 217.63 feet to an 
angle point; thence N03-44-12E, 521.17 feet to a 
point lying at the intersection of said Glen 
Avenue Westerly R.O.W. line and the Southerly 
R.O.W. line of said Chelmsford Road, (Route 
110); thence S86-36-00W, 210.66 feet along said 
Chelmsford Road (Route 110) Southerly R.O.W. 
line to the center line of Watt Terrace, a 30' pri- 
vate way; thence S04-41-06W, 299.00 feet along 
said Watt Terrace centerline to a point; thence 
S86-36-00W, 210.59 feet along Southerly property 
line of land belonging now or formerly of Watt; 
thence running along said Watt's Westerly prop- 
erty line N04-48-10E, 299.09 feet to a point lying 
along the Southerly right-of-way of said Chelms- 
ford Road and being the "Point of Beginning" of 
the herein described parcel of land. 

Said parcel being a proposed "CC" Zone District 
containing an area of 28.5 acres and being a portion 
of a CA (Neighborhood Commercial) CC (Shopping 
Center District) and IA (Limited Industrial) zone as 
shown on the Town of Chelmsford Zoning Map. 

Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved to adjourn the 
Special Town Meeting to Thursday, April 30, 1992 at 
7:30 p.m. at the Parker School Cafetorium. The Mod- 
erator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 10:55 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



26 



ADJOURNED 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 30, 1992 

The Adjourned Special Town Meeting was called 
to order at the Parker School Cafetorium at 7:45 p.m. 
by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum. There were 135 
Town Meeting Representatives present. 

The Moderator had a few announcements. He 
announced ticket information about the upcoming 
High School Play. Also, that absentee ballots are now 
available for the May 27th Special Election. He 
wanted all Representatives to note under their listing 
of Precinct 7 Representatives that Michael Anthony 
was elected to fill the unexpired two year term on 
April 27th by the Precinct 7 Representatives. 

He asked for permission to allow Sylvester 
Ingeme, Business Manager for the School Depart- 
ment, and George Allen, Consultant/Engineer of the 
North Chelmsford Water Department, to speak from 
time to time on certain articles. Motion carried by 
way of a show of hands. 

Due to a conflict with Article 10 and 11, Dennis 
McHugh stepped down as Moderator and appointed 
James Harrington, Town Counsel, as the Acting Mod- 
erator for these articles. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 The Acting Moderator 
James Harrington, read the article and Dean 
Carmeris, Chairman of the Stipends and Benefits 
came forward and explained the article. This article is 
the result of the findings of the Committee which was 
appointed last fall at the fall annual meeting to study 
the issue. The Committee felt that Elected and 
Appointed Officials should be reimbursed for any 
expenses that may occur while holding office. The 
expenses shouldn't exceed the amount of the stipend 
that they presently receive. Officials should not 
receive any stipend because that makes them eligible 
to receive other benefits, such as health and life insur- 
ance, and retirement. The health benefit continues for 
the spouse after the official has passed away. There 
are other committees that put in many hours of work 
and do not receive any compensation. A discussion 
concerning the paying of benefits took place. How 
much money is paid in benefits? The Committee 
wasn't quite sure, because of record keeping, they 
had a difficult time obtaining information on the total 
amount spent on health coverage. Presently at least 
four elected officials are on the Town's Health plan. 
The Committee felt that in order to eliminate the 



expense of benefits, stipends would have to be elimi- 
nated. Cheryl Boss of the Finance Committee 
explained that the yearly cost was estimated to be 
$13,600.00. The amount may not seem like a lot, 
however over the course of many years the amount 
adds up. Initially this was the Finance Committee's 
article, and it was meant to bring forth an educational 
process, to make people aware that elected and 
appointed positions are entitled to receive added 
benefits which costs the Town money, besides the 
stipend pay. People should volunteer to serve on 
boards, not because of the fact that stipend and bene- 
fits are available. Sandra Kilburn questioned the posi- 
tions reported in the paper. Certain positions must be 
paid according to state law, such as the Registrars. 
How can the Town not pay them. The Committee 
wasn't aware that some of these positions mentioned 
were entitled to receive monies. The Acting Modera- 
tor/Town Counsel, explained that if statue states that 
a position must be paid a salary, then this procedure 
will continue and it is not considered a stipend, there- 
fore it would not be affected by this proposed change. 
Many questions were asked and answered. Dennis 
Ready pointed out that the Town Clerk position is an 
appointed position. Wouldn't this by-law change 
effect that individual? Dean Carmeris felt that it 
wouldn't. The Acting Moderator/Town Counsel 
explained that this article would affect only those 
positions that appear in the budget as a stipend arti- 
cle. Not any individual who receives a salary. More 
discussion took place. Brad Emerson moved to table 
the article until the Fall session so further investiga- 
tion into the actual costs could be made. Ed Hilliard 
questioned that if an article is tabled, and not 
removed from the table, then the article is never 
voted on. The Acting Moderator said that this is cor- 
rect. The Acting Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion defeated. A lengthy discussion took 
place. A number of Representatives spoke against the 
article. William Spence, who is the Town's Constable 
explained that he is allowed to charge a certain 
amount for serving and posting warrants. There are 
nine precincts and the Town Office Building location. 
He receives $50.00 for posting at these ten locations, 
which is $5.00 per posting, and it takes at least two 
hours. The State statute sets his fee. He could by 
right charge $28.50 for each precinct that he posts in. 
He also serves for the various departments in the 
Town, and charges a flat rate fee. No matter how 
many times he must return to the location. He feels 
that he has never charged the "going rate," and that 
last year alone had saved the Town approximately 
$3,000 to $4,000 dollars. John Emerson explained all 
the work that the Town Physician does for a fee of 
$1500.00 per year. Barbara Scavezze moved to amend 
the article for Selectman Lawlor by amending the sec- 



27 



ond paragraph first sentence: "Appointed and elected 
officials shall be entitled to receive a reimbursement 
for all documented expenses incurred during the exe- 
cution of their duties." And to delete the second sen- 
tence of paragraph two. Peter Lawlor explained the 
motion to amend. The Acting Moderator asked for 
the Finance Committee's recommendation on the 
motion to amend. The Finance Committee was 
against the motion. The Board of Selectmen had no 
recommendation at this time. Samuel Poulten said 
that if people started charging the Town for their 
actual time and expense then it would far exceed the 
amount being paid in stipends. People still run for 
School Committee knowing that there certainly are no 
benefits or stipends involved. He wanted to know just 
how much money would be saved if stipends were 
eliminated. Dean Carmeris said that the Committee 
didn't necessarily want to not pay stipends, however, 
in order to eliminate the expense involved with the 
health benefits, stipends should no longer be paid. 
The exact cost saving figure was not readily available 
because it would include all the presently retired 
employees. More discussion took place. Dennis Ready 
moved the question. The Acting Moderator asked for 
a show of hands on the motion to stop debate. 
Motion carried, unanimously. He then asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to amend. Motion 
defeated. Back to the main motion. The Acting Mod- 
erator asked for the Finance Committee's recommen- 
dation. The Finance Committee supported the article. 
The Board of Selectmen decided not to take a posi- 
tion on the issue. Elizabeth Marshall urged for pas- 
sage. She felt that this was the time to put all officials 
on the same equal level. Then no one would have to 
consider who should get a stipend for the amount of 
time etc., that one committee contributes vs. another 
committee or individual. Ed Hilliard stated that he 
agreed with Elizabeth Marshall, stipends should be 
eliminated. Perhaps the individuals should be paid 
like in industry, as consultants, when they work they 
get paid. He pointed out that in the event an individ- 
ual or Committee can justify the need for a stipend 
then according to the third paragraph the Representa- 
tives after a vote, may choose to pay one. More dis- 
cussion took place. James Sousa felt that before any 
stipends are eliminated perhaps this should be tabled 
in order to allow the individuals involved to be able 
to express their views, especially after some people 
have contributed twenty to thirty years of service to 
the Town. John Emerson of the Board of Health, 
reminded the Representatives again about the position 
of Town Physician, and that many of the other indi- 
vidual positions are filled by people who certainly 
would be paid a lot more money if paid as a consul- 
tant to a Board. Michael Anthony moved the ques- 
tion to stop debate. The Acting Moderator asked for a 



show of hands, motion carried. He then asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands of the article. This 
left the Chair in doubt the following tellers came for- 
ward: Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simon- 
ian, Jean Horgan. Results, Yes 60 No 66, majority 
needed, the motion is defeated. (See the wording of 
this article in the warrant.) 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Christine Gleason Planning 
Board member, moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Zoning By-law passed and as most recently 
amended entitled "Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Chelmsford" as follows: 

Under "ARTICLE V. DEFINITIONS 

Adult Entertainment Establishments: 

Massage Service Establishments: 

(b) The practice of massage shall not 
include the following individuals while 
engaged in the personal performance of 
duties of their respective professions: 

a. Physicians, surgeons, chiropractors, osteo- 
paths, or physical therapists who are duly 
licensed to practice their respective profes- 
sions in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

b. Nurses who are registered under the laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

c. Barbers and beauticians who are duly licensed 
under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, except that this exclusion shall 
apply solely to the massage of the neck, face, 
scalp, and the hair of the customer or client 
for cosmetic or beautifying purposes." 

By adding the following exclusion as "subsection d." 
to the existing by-law definition of Massage service 
establishments: 

"ARTICLE V. DEFINITIONS 

Adult Entertainment Establishments: 

Massage Service Establishments: 

(b) The practice of massage shall not in- 
clude the following individuals while 
engaged in the personal performance of 
duties of their respective professions: 

a. Physicians, surgeons, chiropractors, osteo- 



28 



paths, or physical therapists who are duly 
licensed to practice their respective profes- 
sions in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

b. Nurses who are registered under the laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

c. Barbers and beauticians who are duly licensed 
under the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, except that this exclusion shall 
apply solely to the massage of the neck, face, 
scalp, and the hair of the customer or client 
for cosmetic or beautifying purposes. 

d. Massage therapists who are duly permitted to 
practice under the Rules and Regulations of 
the Chelmsford Board of Health." 

Dennis McHugh, represented Harriett Fishman 
who had petitioned for this zoning change. He gave a 
presentation explaining the use of massage therapy. 
The Board of Health would be responsible for the 
rules and regulations involved with massage therapy. 
This is to allow the practice of massage therapy to 
exist in the Town. Harriett Fishman came forward 
and explained her educational background. Two of 
her patients came forward and spoke on behalf of 
Harriett Fishman and her use of massage therapy. A 
discussion took place. Where would the location be? 
Dennis McHugh explained. First in order for this to 
even be considered, a zoning change is required in 
order to allow massage therapy to take place any 
place in Town. Harriett Fishman would like to oper- 
ate this out of her home, however, this would require 
a home occupation permit from the Board of Appeals 
because of being in a residential area. If she decided 
not to petition the Board of Appeals, then the busi- 
ness would be in an office setting in a business zone. 
James Good, Chairman of the Planning Board read 
the Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board held a public hearing of the 
above mentioned issue on March 11, 1992. At the 
meeting of March 25, 1992, a decision was rendered 
in favor (5-1) and with (1) one abstention to recom- 
mend to Town Meeting the above mentioned change 
in the zoning By-laws of ARTICLE V. DEFINITIONS 
- Adult Entertainment Establishments, Massage Ser- 
vice Establishments, the addition of the exclusion 
"subsection d." to the existing by-law definition. 

The Acting Moderator asked for a vote by way of 
a show of hands. This required either an unanimous 
or a Vs's vote. The tellers came forward and con- 
ducted a hand count. The results: Yes 109 No 6, 77 is 
Vi's the motion carried. 



Dennis McHugh returned to the Chair as Modera- 
tor, and the meeting continued. 

(NOTE THERE IS NO ARTICLE 12, WARRANT 
WAS MISNUMBERED) 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved to withdraw this article. Town Manager, 
Bernard Lynch explained that this was the proposal 
for land taking as a future Library site. The plans had 
not yet been completed, more work needed to be 
done. He asked for approval of the withdrawal as it 
will be resubmitted on the fall warrant. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen support the 
motion to withdraw. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to rescind a portion of the 
authorization to borrow funds under Article 8 of the 
Annual Town Meeting held in 1990 by the sum of 
$232,345.00 which represents an amount authorized 
but unused to complete the Mandated Handicap 
Access Project. 

Town Manager Lynch explained that this is the 
amount of money that would have been borrowed for 
previous Town Meeting action for a certain Capital 
Planning item. When a certain amount of money is 
specifically voted on, then the project or item must be 
completed or purchased for any other project or item. 
This money amount was never borrowed, this is to 
clear the books. The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen support the article. The Modera- 
tor asked for a vote by a show of hands, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

Dennis McHugh again stepped down as Modera- 
tor. James Harrington, Town Counsel presided over 
the next article as the Acting Moderator. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved to waive the reading of the meets and bounds. 
The Acting Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. 

Bruce Harper moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Zoning Map and the Zoning by-laws as 
follows: 

The Zoning Map and accompanying ordinance 
passed and as most recently amended entitled "Zon- 
ing By-Laws of the Town of Chelmsford" is hereby 
amended by establishing new lines and striking out 
the designation "Open Space" (OS) District, as shown 
on said zone map, and substituting in place thereof 



29 



new lines and designation "Public" (P) District, inso- 
far as said zone map relates to the following described 
premises. (See the warrant for the wording of the arti- 
cle.) 

Dennis McHugh, representing the North Chelms- 
ford Water District explained the article. The District 
has proposed that the zoning of a piece of land off 
Swain Road be changed from Open Space to Public 
Use to facilitate the purchase of the land by the Dis- 
trict and construction of a water tank to serve the 
needs of the North Chelmsford Water District. The 
Commissioners have chosen this method to advance 
the interest of the District to work with the zoning in 
the town if at all possible. The Commissioners have 
had a documented shortage of fire flow pressure in 
the District since 1984 with no significant deficiency. 
The low fire flow pressure is documented by addi- 
tional tests done in 1989 and 1990 to confirm the situ- 
ation. The water storage that the District has consists 
of two tanks located centrally in the District, one of 
which is 84 years old and surviving much longer than 
any of its planners ever expected. An engineering 
report made to the Commissioners in 1989 confirmed 
that the tank needed extensive repairs and should be 
replaced. There is approximately 400,000 gallons of 
usable storage right now. There is a need for 800,000 
gallons of additional storage right now. The Commis- 
sioners engaged the engineering firm of Dufresne 
Henry to analyze the District and its needs and make 
a recommendation. The firm examined the topogra- 
phy of the district and the land use and proposed six 
prospective locations. The firm expertise supports 
decentralizing the storage of water. The Northern sec- 
tion of the District consisted of more residential use 
and lower fire flow pressure presented more of a fire 
hazard to families and homes in the District and has 
more open space presenting the possibility of more 
future development so the Commissioners decided to 
place the replacement tank in the northern section of 
the District. The sites located in the northern section 
was a piece of land located at the rear of Scotty Hol- 
low condominiums on land owned by the North Con- 
gregational Church, a parcel of land beside the Gro- 
ton Road access to Rt. 3, a parcel of land at the end 
of Harding Street and a parcel of land off Swain Road 
owned by the Sportsmen Club. The Commissioner's 
analyzed all the sites. They did not negotiate with all 
owners purchase and sale agreements, or easements 
or obtain appraisals of taking by eminent domain. 
Nor did they engage engineers to do further studies 
to document in detail the specific difference on the 
entire system of each location. They did compare the 
location and prospective use of each parcel and they 
did try to coordinate the data because each site was 
different having its own difficulties and/or advan- 



tages. They did compare some of the purchase values 
of the various sites. The Swain Road site abuts a pub- 
lic way, provides benefits to the northeast direction 
and a west and southerly direction. The acquisition 
would require dealing with only one owner with no 
need for further access. Also the owners were willing 
to sell so the eminent domain issues could be 
avoided. He then described the tank. There would be 
no interaction with the landfill, the water is piped in 
and piped out. He said that the Commissioner's have 
been before the Representatives at the previous Fall 
meeting with the same proposal, and have met with 
neighbors in an effort to come back with a proposal 
supported by all the neighbors. Since then significant 
progress has been made. He then read into the record 
the following letter from the North Chelmsford Water 
Commissioners. 

"The issue of control over the proposed actions of 
the Commissioners of the North Chelmsford Water 
District has been raised repeatedly as a danger of pas- 
sage of the zoning change proposed by the District 
for a water tank on Swain Road. The Commissioners 
hereby submit this letter of conditions as a covenant 
with the Town of Chelmsford to allay any fears any 
concerned parties may have that the Commissioners 
intend to independently change the plans presented 
at Town Meeting to the disadvantage and dismay of 
the neighbors or to use the premises for any other 
purpose than a water tank. 

Should the Town Meeting Representatives decide 
favorably to change the zoning of the land sought by 
the North Chelmsford Water District for the water 
tank, the Commissioners hereby agree to build the 
water tank presented at Town Meeting, the standpipe 
design, in accordance with the plan presented and to 
provide the enhancements to the premises for screen- 
ing. The Commissioners further agree to provide the 
enhancements to the land fill access road if permitted 
by the Town of Chelmsford, on whose land the land 
fill access road is located. The Commissioners agree 
that this covenant may be part of any ruling of the 
Board of Appeals. If the Commissioners are to build 
the standpipe, because of the height of the structure, 
they will apply for a variance from the Board of 
Appeals. 

There is no reason within the control of the Water 
Commissioners that this location would be used for 
anything other than a water tank. In the event that 
the zoning change is allowed, no other use described 
in the use schedule of the zoning by-law will be made 
of the parcel. Most uses require special permitting, 
anyway. 



30 



In the very unlikely event that the Commissioners 
are unable to pursue this location after rezoning to 
public use for reasons beyond the Commissioner's 
control, the Commissioners agree to bring a petition 
to the Town Meeting to rezone this parcel as Open 
Space. This would be presented to the Town Meeting 
Representatives at the first appropriate Town Meeting 
for zoning changes after the site is abandoned as a 
possibility for the water tank. 

The Commissioners acknowledge that they do not 
control all interested parties and face the possibility 
that a party beyond the control of the Water Commis- 
sioners may choose to pursue actions to delay or pre- 
vent the Commissioners from pursuing these plans on 
this site. The actions of others may dictate actions of 
the Commissioners but the Commissioners submit 
that if they are not prevented by other parties, they 
will complete the plans as proposed. 

The Commissioners have an obligation to the 
water takers in the District and, in good faith, cannot 
give up their responsibility to their electorate to do 
their best to construct the needed water tank and 
cannot not give up any statutory rights or obligations 
should zoning changes and permitting through this 
process not be possible. 

Thank you for your cooperation. 

North Chelmsford Water District 
Signed by Bruce H. Clark, Chairman 

Dennis McHugh stated that the Commissioners 
represent an entire district of approximately 2500 
users of water. They are not developers of industrial 
parks of multifamily developments and asks that they 
not be thought about in this way. They are not plan- 
ning to provide water for the Westford development 
of Greystone Park. There is developable land in North 
Chelmsford that they are supposed to support but 
right now only 200,000 gallons of this tank is for 
future development. There is a 800,000 gallon storage 
shortage right now. The Commissioner's submit that 
most of the district supports the proposed site and 
asks for support of the article. 

Numerous questions were asked and answered by 
the abutters who lived in the area of the site. Sue 
Olsen questioned if the Planning Board has as 
required by law, notified all the surrounding cities 
and towns of the proposed zoning change. The Act- 
ing Moderator/Town Counsel responded that to his 
understanding the Board has. In fact, if there is any 
questions on the procedural issues, the Attorney Gen- 
eral will address this once the by-law has been sub- 



mitted to him for approval. Bob Joyce wanted to 
know what was different from this site, than the site 
that was proposed last fall? Dennis McHugh 
responded that the site was the same, just that the 
issues raised at the Fall meeting have been addressed. 
A more detailed plan has been presented, plus a 
covenant. How was this to be paid? A 1.4 million dol- 
lar bond would be floated over a thirty year period, 
the cost would be borne by the North water takers. 
George Allen answered questions concerning the 
building and engineering of the tank. Concerns were 
raised by people who lived in the Wain Pond area 
about the drainage methods to be used when draining 
the tank. This area already has a problem with 
beavers damming up the pond. It was felt that any 
added water to the pond would cause damage. It was 
replied that the tank would be drained every fifteen 
years. And guaranteed that strict precautions would 
be taken. 

The Acting Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Finance Commit- 
tee had no recommendation at this time. He asked for 
the Board of Selectmen's recommendation, Chairman 
William Logan responded that a majority of the Board 
was against the article. He asked for the Planning 
Board's recommendation. The Chairman of the Plan- 
ning Board James Good, read the Boards recommen- 
dation: 

The Planning Board held a Public Hearing on the 
above mentioned issue on March 11, 1992. At the 
meeting of April 22, 1992, a decision was rendered in 
which they voted (4-2) in favor to recommend to 
Town Meeting Article 15 for an Amendment to the 
existing Zoning Map and the Zoning By-Laws to 
change from "Open Space" (OS) District to the desig- 
nation of "Public" (P) District of the attached 
described land. 

A lengthy discussion followed. Kenneth Ferron a 
direct abutter said that many of the issues had not 
been fully addressed by the neighbors in the immedi- 
ate area. Since last fall the alternative sites stated had 
not been fully explored as alternate sites. Not against 
the need for constructing a tank for the additional 
water, just feels that more questions need to be 
answered concerning this particular site. 

Sue Olsen expressed concerns of the North 
Chelmsford's Water District public meeting proce- 
dures that were held concerning this article. She pro- 
posed to amend the article. That any further land 
needed for the North Water District Commission 
must be taken by Town Meeting vote. The Acting 
Moderator ruled this motion out of order. 



31 



A number of Representatives spoke in favor of the 
article. Harry Foster, Ronald Wetmore, and George 
Merrill asked for support. Brad Emerson moved the 
question to stop debate. The Acting Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on the motion. Motion carried, 
unanimously. He asked for a show of hands on the 
article. This requires a 2 A's vote, he asked the tellers 
to come forward and conduct a hand count. The 
result was Yes 63 No 53, Vs's is 77 the motion is 
defeated. 

Robert Joyce moved to reconsider Article 10. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
defeated. Dennis McHugh returned to the podium as 
Moderator. 

Seeing that there was no further business at hand, 
Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved that the Special 
Town Meeting be adjourned and that the Annual 
Town Meeting be adjourned to Monday, May 4th at 
7:30 p.m., at the Parker School Cafetorium. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the motion. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried. The meeting 
adjourned at 11:05 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 4, 1992 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called 
to order at the Parker School Cafetorium at 7:35 p.m. 
by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum. There were 142 
Town Meeting Representatives present. He 
announced that Thursday, May 7th was the last day 
to register to vote with the Town Clerk, for the 
upcoming Special Town Election on May 27th. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Dennis Ready moved that 
the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Home Rule 
Charter under Part III, section 3-2 (c), Board of Select- 
men Appointment Powers, by deleting the following: 

"(c) Appointment Powers 

The board of selectmen shall appoint a town 
manager, a town counsel, town accountant, and a 
board of registrars of voters (but not including the 
town clerk) . The board of selectmen shall also appoint 
such other multiple member bodies as may be pro- 
vided by by-law." 



and add the following as Part III, Section 3-2 (c): 

"(c) The board of selectmen shall appoint a town 
manager, a town counsel, a town accountant, and a 
board of registrars of voters (but not including the 
town clerk). The board of selectmen shall also appoint 
such policy making or policy advisory committees as 
they deem necessary, licensing committees, and such 
other multiple member bodies as may be provided by 
by-law. " 

Dennis Ready explained the article. That when 
the Charter became in effect, it divided the executive 
branch of government duties into two groups. Opera- 
tional duties which gave all power to the Town Man- 
ager and policies and rights duties to the Board of 
Selectmen. The language is not clear. Only the Town 
manager can appoint people to a committee. So if the 
Board of Selectmen wants to form a committee to 
advise themselves on a policy that it wants to draw 
up, like the Sexual Harassment Policy Committee, the 
language would not allow the Selectmen to form this 
committee to advise themselves. This would not take 
any power away from the Town Manager. He would 
still make decisions on operational policies. Cheryl 
Boss spoke against the article. The Moderator asked 
for a recommendation for the Selectmen. The Board 
of Selectmen supports the article. Dean Carmeris 
asked the Town Manager of his opinion on the arti- 
cle. Bernard Lynch said that he had no problem with 
the article, because he has the power to decide on 
any operational policy. A discussion followed. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands. This left the Chair in doubt. He asked for the 
following tellers to come forward and conduct a hand 
count. Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Jean Horgan, 
Lucy Simonian. Result of the count Yes 57 No 46 2 A's 
is 69 motion is defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$18,000.00 from the sale of Graves and Lots to the 
Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund. 

Selectman Logan explained the purpose of the 
article. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the 
article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Select- 
men, to enter into compensatory balance agreements, 
during Fiscal Year 1993, as permitted by General 



32 



Laws. Chapter 44. Section 53F. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that 
this is a yearly article that must be done. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen supported the 
article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved to dismiss Article 5. 

Selectman Logan explained that there were no 
bills for the previous year and that this article is not 
necessary, and recommends dismissal. The Finance 
Committee recommended dismissal. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Samuel Poulten moved that 
the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 12 
of Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985. the School 
Improvement Act. in relation to the Equal Educa- 
tional Opportunity Grant in the amount of $17,207.00 
for the Nashoba Valley Technical High School for the 
1991-92 school year. 

Samuel Poulten explained that this is the amount 
of grant money available and that each Town in the 
district must vote on it in order for Nashoba to 
receive the grant. The Finance Committee is in favor 
of the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended 
the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of 
a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Ruth K. Delaney moved that 
the Town vote to accept the provisions of General 
Laws Chapter 59. Section 5. Thirty Seventh A. rela- 
tive to the exemption of certain real estate from taxa- 
tion; such acceptance to be effective for fiscal year 
1993. 

Ruth Delaney explained that this would allow the 
blind exemptions to be increased $62.50. The present 
rate is $437.50. If this passed the rate would be 
S500.00 which is what the other exemptions are. 
There are 30 blind exemptions. The total cost increase 
would be $1,875.00. The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to 
convey and transfer, all right, title and interest, if 
any. held by the Town, in a certain parcel of land 



located on Shore Drive, and shown on Assessor's 
Map 45 as Lot 15. Containing 5,000 square feet of 
land, more or less, all in compliance with the Uni- 
form Procurement Act. M.G.L. Chapter 30B. 

The Town Manager explained that this article 
refers to the sale of land. In the past abutters have 
come forth and explained why they want the land in 
question. Now it is required that any land with a 
value of over $500.00 must be put out to bid, if the 
body votes in favor, then this will be done. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen rec- 
ommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 The Moderator read the arti- 
cle. Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved to amend the 
article by deleting Burton Lane and reducing the 
amount to be raised and appropriated to $7.00. 
Selectman Logan explained that Burton Lane was to 
be removed from this list because it was not up to 
specifications at this time, therefore the dollar amount 
would be reduced by $1.00. The Moderator then read 
the article again. Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved 
that the Town vote to accept the following mentioned 
streets, as laid out by the board of Selectmen and 
shown by their reports duly filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk: 

1 . Boardwalk 

2. Pennsylvania Avenue 

3. Waterford Place 

4. Braeburn Road 
1. Purcell Drive 

6. Thornton Lane 

7. Meehan Drive 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with 
the requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and sub- 
ject to the withholding of any remaining bonds until 
such requirements have been met: and to see if the 
Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire any and all temporary and/or permanent ease- 
ments, and any property in fee simple, with trees 
thereon, by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, 
for the purpose of securing traffic safety and road 
improvements, and vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $7.00 to defray all necessary costs, fees and 
expenses in connection with the acquisition of said 
land and for paying any damages which may be 
awarded as a result of any such taking and vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and 
execute all necessary and proper contracts and agree- 
ments thereto. 



33 



The Moderator asked for the Finance Commit- 
tee's recommendation on the motion to amend. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the amendment. 
The Board of Selectmen supported the motion to 
amend. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands. Motion carried. He then asked for the 
Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen's recom- 
mendation on the motion as amended. Both Boards 
were in favor of the article as amended. The Modera- 
tor asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the establish- 
ment of a Revolving Fund under Chapter 44, Section 
53E Vi for the Recreation Commission for Fiscal Year 
1993. The receipts to be credited to the fund shall be 
from the collection of user and admission fees from 
recreational programs. The Recreation Commission 
shall be authorized to spend money from the fund by 
majority vote the purpose of purchasing and main- 
taining equipment and supplies, maintaining property 
under the control of the Commission, and administer- 
ing the recreational program of the Town. Expendi- 
tures from the Recreation Revolving Fund shall be 
limited to $40,000.00 during Fiscal Year 1993. 

The Town Manager explained that this was an 
annual article. Recreation in the past had a revolving 
fund, which couldn't be used to pay salaries. Two 
years ago this was switched over to be a revolving 
account, in accordance with a State Law. As a result 
the Recreation Department is a self-supporting 
department. It must be reported each year on who is 
using the account, how much is being spent. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen sup- 
ported the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by 
way of a show of hands, motion carried, unani- 
mously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Chairman of the Sewer 
Commission, John P. Emerson, Jr., moved that the 
Town vote to transfer the sum of $1,300,000.00 from 
sewer betterments, special revenue, to reduce the 
exempt portion of debt and interest in the Fiscal Year 
1993 Budget. 

John Emerson explained that this money is used 
to reduce the debt and interest for the ongoing sewer 
project. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

John Emerson moved to reconsider Article 2 at 
this time. He felt that where it lost by such a small 



vote earlier, now more Representatives have arrived it 
should be reconsidered. The Finance Committee and 
the Board of Selectmen were in favor or reconsidera- 
tion. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
which left the Chair in doubt. The tellers came for- 
ward and took a hand count, Yes 74 No 42 motion 
carried to reconsider Article 2. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 John Emerson moved to 
amend the article by striking from Section C the 
words "such policy making or" and read "such policy 
advisory committees." He explained the purpose of 
the amendment. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Finance Commit- 
tee was not in favor of motion to amend. The Board 
of Selectmen were in favor of the motion to amend. 
Edward Hilliard questioned the article. He felt that 
the Selectmen should still make decisions on licensing 
and not be able to delegate this decision. He moved 
to amend the amendment by striking "licensing Com- 
mittees" from section (c). The Moderator asked for 
the Finance Committee's recommendation on the 
motion to amend. They were not in favor of the 
motion. He then asked for the Selectmen's recom- 
mendation, they unanimously supported the amend- 
ment. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried. He then asked for dis- 
cussion on the motion to amend. A number of Repre- 
sentatives spoke in favor of the motion to amend. The 
Moderator asked for a vote on the motion to amend, 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried. Asked if 
there was any discussion on the main motion as 
amended. More discussion took place. Representatives 
spoke against the article. The moderator asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands, the motion is 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 The Town Manager 
Bernard Lynch moved to dismiss this article. He 
explained that this article had been inserted in case it 
would be needed because the posting of the warrant 
is done way before the final figures are completed for 
the budget process. He sees no need to act upon the 
item at this time. Both the Finance Committee and 
the Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion to 
withdraw. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 The Moderator explained 
that the following article is the budget for fiscal 
period from July 1, 1992 to June 30, 1993. The town 
Manager, Bernard Lynch would address the Town 
Meeting Body at this time. 

The Town Manager first gave a list and explana- 
tion of changes to be made to the balanced budget 
figures. 



34 



2 


Treasurers Expenses 
to convert compensating 






balance agreement 


$ +90,000 


6 


Chelmsford School Dept. 
for level service 






budgeting 


+220,439 


13 


Municipal Waste Col- 
lection for leaf collection 






in the Spring 


+ 7,000 




Cemetery Budget Adjustment 


19 


Personnel Services 


+24,000 


20 
23 


Expenses 

To use for add'l help, 
money will be used from 
the perpetual care acct. 
for expenses 

Elder Services Budget 


-24,000 




correction 


-10,000 



$ 347,091 



23,048,115 



1,049,898 



144,693 
691 



34 Solid Waste Enterprise 
Expenses and Receipts 



-639,000 



279,946 



464,000 



The Town Manager went on to say that Chelms- 
ford was a fiscally sound community. He wanted to 
maintain this status. The surrounding cities and 
towns were facing budget cutbacks and layoffs. 
Chelmsford has already gone through this and as a 
result has had and will continue to have a level ser- 
vice budget. Hopefully within a year or two we will 
be able to reinstate some of the programs that have 
had to be cut back. He asked for support of the bud- 
get as presented. 

The Moderator explained the procedure he was 
going to use going through the budget. He would 
name the line item which applies to the category and 
read the numbers going down the specific category. 
At this point any and all amendments and discussion 
is to take place. No final vote will be taken until the 
end. 

He read the Municipal Administration category 
and its total figures, then read the specific category 
beginning with the Executive Office, Town 
manager/Selectmen, where a question was asked con- 
cerning any new positions. The Town Manager 
explained that the position of Data Processing Man- 
ager will be added. This person will be responsible for 
maintaining the data processing system which will be 
installed within the year, in the Accounting Office, 
Finance Office, and the Police Department. This per- 
son will also be responsible for maintaining the cur- 



rent software/hardware system. The salary will be 
$35,000 per year. Ed Hilliard questioned why wasn't 
the person and the system at the School Department 
being used. As far as he knew only the Town Clerk's 
Office had tied into the School's system. Has the per- 
son and the system already been chosen? No, nothing 
has been decided on. He expressed concerns about 
having the same person design and maintain a com- 
puter system. Felt that consultants should design the 
system and that a separate person should maintain 
the system. The Town Manager said that the School's 
system is full. He explained that the Computer Tech- 
nology Study Committee had in fact checked all alter- 
natives and felt that this position is needed. Joel Karp 
explained that for the past four to five years, he has 
been a volunteer data processing person at the Town 
Office building, and as of July 1st, he will no longer 
be available. The Town will have to make the provi- 
sions to have in-house expertise to do certain things. 
This is not a highly level person, basically it is an 
operational person. One who will make sure that sys- 
tems are backed up. Make sure that 911 which was 
voted two years ago is done correctly. Make sure that 
there is someone on the Town Managers staff who 
will know that things are being done right. The 
School Department's position is level funded. Sur- 
rounding cities and towns have this position, it is 
greatly needed. The Moderator asked for more discus- 
sion. Hearing none he continued to read from the 
Personnel Board through Data Processing asking for 
discussion after each category. At the Assessors a 
question was asked about the Legal Services. The 
Town Manager explained that this is used for appel- 
lant tax cases. He continued to read to the Outlay 
account of the Registrars Department, where it was 
explained that outlay is generally the purchase of 
office equipment. He continued to read to line 
NMCOG, where it was explained that NMCOG stood 
for Northern Middlesex Council of Government. For- 
merly known as NEMAC. The Town is a member of 
this organization. This is to cover the expense of 
membership. He continued to read asking for discus- 
sion up to the Planning Board. Under Education a 
discussion took place. It was asked how much money 
is spent on salaries. Dr. Moser said that the amount 
shown does not reflect any increases that could occur 
from negotiations. If there would be any increase then 
cuts would be made within the budget or possibly an 
override will be sought. How much of an increase 
would there be. He couldn't really discuss any salary 
amounts, due to negotiations. Thomas Moran dis- 
cussed the closing of the West Fire Station. He felt 
that the station should be re-opened and the extra 
money that the Town manager was giving to the 
School Department should be used instead towards 
the Fire Station. He asked how much money would 



35 



be needed to re-open the station? $296,000., was the 
response. He explained the time needed from the sta- 
tion in North to cover the West area. People should 
realize that five minutes makes a difference. It's not 
just fires that the Stations respond to. The Fire 
Department responds to medical emergencies. He 
moved to take $220,000 from Line 6 the School 
Department budget to the Fire Department expressly 
to be used for re-opening the West Fire Station. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's recom- 
mendation. The Finance Committee acknowledges 
that this is a very difficult area to discuss. The School 
Committee needs the money now in order to main- 
tain their level of services, and therefore is against the 
motion to amend the School Budget. The Moderator 
asked the Board of Selectmen for their recommenda- 
tion. The majority of the Board was against the 
motion to amend. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to amend the School Budget. 
Motion defeated. John Coppinger wanted to know 
how much is paid in salaries. Presently $13.5 million 
dollars are paid in salaries alone out of the budget. 
The Moderator read the figure of Nashoba Tech. 
Where at Public Safety a discussion took place under 
the Fire Department. Thomas Moran moved to 
increase the Fire Department budget, under Public 
Safety line 8 by $296,000. for the express purpose of 
re-opening the West Fire Station. It was questioned 
where would this money come from. Thomas Moran 
could not respond. The Moderator asked for the 
Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee was not in favor of the motion to amend. 
He asked for the Selectmen's recommendation. The 
majority of the Board of Selectmen without knowing 
where the funding would come from were not in 
favor of the motion to amend. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on the motion to amend. Motion 
defeated. He continued to read from Emergency Man- 
agement through the Highway Division, asking for 
discussion after each. Under Street Lighting, Ed 
Hilliard wanted to know why there was an increase? 
Wasn't the use of Sodium Vapor Lamps vs. the Mer- 
cury Vapor Lamps saving money? The Town Manager 
explained that this is the cost of leasing lights at a 
cost of $1500. per month. That an item under the 
capital budget will address future savings. The article 
will appropriate money to purchase 1000 sodium 
lights this first year. There are 2500 lights in town, 
eventually all will be replaced. The Moderator read 
the Waste Collection budget where it was asked about 
the increase. The Town Manager explained that this 
was the additional cost of the Spring leaf pickup. The 
Moderator continued to read from Sewer Division to 
the end of the Enterprise Funds, asking for discussion 
after each. He then read the Total Operating Budget 
figure of $45,838,156.00. Thomas Welch wanted to 



reduce each department budget by less than 1% 
which would result in raising the $296,000. needed 
for opening the West Fire Station. He would be will- 
ing to go through each department and reduce the 
categories. The Town Manager was not in favor of 
this motion. Due to the fact that the School Depart- 
ment budget cannot be touched. As a result this 
would throw off the General Government side of the 
budget, where the makeup in funding would have to 
occur. Thomas Welch asked for a show of support on 
just discussing going through the budget again, line 
item by line item. If there wouldn't be any support, 
then he would withdraw his motion. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, the body was not in favor 
of further discussion. He withdrew his motion. 

The Moderator explained that $45,838,156 was 
the total operating budget. This figure will be reduced 
by receipts, $464,900 from the enterprise fund, and 
$472,000 from the sewer offset receipts, and 
$1,300,000 from special revenue of the sewer bond. 
For an actual figure of $43,601,256. 

The Moderator explained that he had a motion 
from Selectman Jeffrey Brem, to divide Article 13 into 
two decisions. 

One was to entertain a motion to raise and appro- 
priate a certain sum of money to defray Town charges 
as recommended by the Town Manager representing 
a balanced budget. 

The second was to entertain a motion to raise and 
appropriate certain sums of money to defray Town 
charges contingent upon passage of a referendum 
question under paragraph (g) of Section 59 of the 
General Laws. 

Essentially the motion is to amend the main 
motion under Article 13 to have two separate votes. 
One will be to vote to amend the main motion. Then 
to vote a budget number without the override, then a 
vote will be taken of a budget number with the over- 
ride. If the override doesn't pass a budget figure will 
be in place. Then contingent on the override passing, 
a budget figure will be in place. He asked for the 
Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen's recom- 
mendation on the motion to amend. Both Boards 
were in favor. The Moderator asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. He 
then asked for a vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $43,601,256 which included all receipts. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. He then asked 
for a vote on the sum of $1,560,453.00 to be raised 
and appropriated and the enterprise fund to be 



36 



decreased to 0.00 contingent on the passage of a ref- 
erendum question under paragraph (g) of M.G.L. 
Chapter 59, Section 21 (c) said sum to be added to 
the sum appropriated to Line Item #13, D.P.W. 
Expense under Article 13 of the 1992 Annual Town 
Meeting. The Town Manager explained that this is a 
contingency vote so that the Solid Waste Budget will 
be set. Depending upon the outcome of the override 
vote. This amount is remainder of the total cost of 
the first year of the trash contract. Already $85,000.00 
has been put into the D.P.W. budget. If the override 
passes then the D.P.W. budget will be increased by 
$1,560,453. If it fails then the account figure would 
remain at $85,000. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the motion. The Board of Selectmen were in 
favor of the motion. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unani- 
mously. The Budget reads as follows: 



20. Expenses 

21. Out-of -State 

22. Outlay 

TOTAL 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

23. Personnel Services 

24. Expenses 

25. Out-of -State 

26. Outlay 

TOTAL 

LIBRARY 

27. Personnel Services 

28. Expenses 

29. Out-of-State 

30. Outlay 

TOTAL 



691 
500 

4,000 



149,884 



279,946 

120,925 







400,871 



473,856 

195,716 

500 





670,072 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

1. Personnel Services $ 892,036 

2. Expenses 347,091 

3. Out-of-State 2,300 

4. Outlay 4,001 

5. Legal Services 25,000 

TOTAL 1,270,428 

CHELMSFORD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

6. Total Budget 23,048,115 
NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

$ 488,956 



5,172,976 

391,002 

3,500 

25,500 



7. 


Total Budget 


PUBLIC SAFETY 


8. 


Personnel Services 


9. 


Expenses 


10. 


Out-of-State 


11. 


Outlay 


TOTAL 


PUBLIC WORKS 


12. 


Personnel Services 


13. 


Expenses 


14. 


Out-of-State 


15. 


Outlay 


16. 


Snow & Ice 



TOTAL 

SEWER COMMISSION 

17. Expense 

18. Out-of-State 

TOTAL 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

19. Personnel Services 



5,592,978 



911,386 

1,049,898 

1,500 

7,000 

350,000 

2,319,784 



55,000 


55,000 
144,693 



UNDISTRIBUTED EXPENSES 

31. Total Budget 

DEBT AND INTEREST 

32. Principal 

33. Interest 

TOTAL 

ENTERPRISE FUNDS 

34. Expense 

Enterprise Receipts 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 

Reduced by Receipts: 

Enterprise Fund 

Sewer Offset Receipts 

Reduced by Special Revenue: 
Sewer Bond 

TOTAL RAISE AND APPROPRIATE 



4,334,825 



4,720,000 
2,322,343 

7,042,343 



464,900 

464,900 
$45,838,156 

464,900 
472,000 

44,901,256 
1,300,000 

$43,601,256 



UNDER ARTICLE 14 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appro- 
priate, the sum of $25,000.00 for the purpose of pro- 
viding Senior Citizen Real Estate Tax Payment Vouch- 
ers for services rendered, pursuant to an agreement to 
be formulated by the Council on Aging and approved 
by Town Manager. 

The Town Manager explained that this is a pro- 
gram that originally started in Colorado. This would 
allow fifty senior citizens to work as part-time 
employees providing services for the Town. In return 
the Town would put $500.00 directly towards their 
property tax. Its a way to draw resources, and for the 
Seniors to use their experiences. Marty Walsh, Direc- 



37 



tor of the Council on Aging, answered questions con- 
cerning the article. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. A majority of the Board of Select- 
men supported the intent but do not support the arti- 
cle at this time. Selectman DeFreitas spoke in favor of 
the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of 
a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, Dwight Hayward, moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $175,000.00 
to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the 
Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Dwight Hayward explained that this is a standard 
article. Money is put aside each year to handle emer- 
gency situations that may arise. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to appropriate a certain 
sum of money for the following capital projects: 



Library Building, the sum of $200.60 and Arti- 
cle 17. Police Office Remodel, the sum of 
$305.26. 

2. Special Town Meeting 1989 Article 7. School 
Back Flow Valves, the sum of $290.41. 

3. Annual Town Meeting 1989 Article 10. Rte. 
129 Study, the sum of $6,573.07; School Sep- 
tic, the sum of $1,275.36; School Handicap 
Restroom, the sum of $464.58; O.T.H. Chair 
Lift, the sum of $19,813.36. 

4. Special Town Meeting 1990 Article 3. School 
Student Furniture, the sum of $1,288.93; 
School Tennis Courts, the sum of $17,935.62. 

5. Annual Town Meeting 1990 Article 8. School 
MCarthy Roof, the sum of of $48,657.00; 
Sewer Pick-Up Truck, the sum of $295.00. 

6. Annual Town Meeting 1991 Article 9. Sewer 
Truck, the sum of $2,578.30; Cemetery Back- 
hoe, the sum of $5,056.90. 



Cemetery Truck 

Data Processing Hardware & Software 

DPW Road Resurfacing 

DPW Middlesex Road Canal Deck 

DPW Sidewalk Construction 

DPW Streetlights 

Fire Breathing Apparatus 

Fire Ramp Repaving Eng. 3,4,5 

Police Portable Radios 

Police Cruisers 

School CHS Ext. Stairs 

School Parker Roof Repairs 

School CHS Gym Divider 

School CHS Gym Floor 

School CHS Lavatory Partition 

School McCarthy Fire Alarms 

School Interior Maintenance 

School Stadium Seats/Press Box 

HVAC Upgrades 

TOTAL 



$ 22,000.00 

100,000.00 

200,000.00 

60,000.00 

200,000.00 

235,317.00 

10,000.00 

15,000.00 

25,000.00 

64,000.00 

12,000.00 

110,000.00 

10,000.00 

50,000.00 

10,000.00 

30,000.00 

15,000.00 

30,000.00 

51,029.00 

$1,249,346.00 



and to see if the Town will vote, for the purpose of 
funding these obligations, to transfer and appropriate 
from the stabilization fund the sum of $64,000.00; 
borrow the sum of $1,080,611.61 and transfer and 
appropriate from unexpended proceeds of borrowed 
funds the total sum of $104,734.39 from the following 
accounts: 

1. Annual Town Meeting 1987 Article 15. 



The Town Manager explained that extended 
scrutiny is done on behalf of the Capital Planning 
Committee, Finance Committee and Departments on 
preparing the figures for these items or projects. He 
discussed a number of the items shown, explaining 
the need for each one. The Finance Committee rec- 
ommended the article. Norman LeBrecque raised a 
question concerning the street lights. The Town man- 
ager explained that $67,000. goes to Mass. Electric for 
disconnection fee. The installation fee is $72,000. 
Capital Cost is $77,000. $18,000. service fee. This 
would be for 905 lights. There are 128 streets would 
be affected. The result would be about a 14% 
decrease in illumination. The savings in payback 
would be in 5.4 years. The Town would own the 
lights, not be leasing from Mass. Electric. It would 
cost the Town approximately $550,000. to do the 
whole Town at this time. The Moderator asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $20,000.00 for the purpose of funding the 
sand lease approved by the Town under Article 12 of 
the 1989 Annual Town Meeting. 

Selectman Logan explained that this has been an 
ongoing contract since 1989, it saves the Town 
money. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 



38 



show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, 
the sum of S21.000.00 to engage a private accounting 
firm to prepare an audit of all accounts in all depart- 
ments in the Town of Chelmsford. 

Selectman Logan explained that the firm of 
Brown and Barrett had won the bid and that is the 
firm who will be doing the audit. The Finance Com- 
mittee was in favor of the article. Frank Miethe asked 
if there is a report filed at the completion. The Town 
Manager said that this past year's audit has just been 
completed a month ago and a report will be on file. 
The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator discussed the location of the 
Town Meetings. If the Representatives wanted to 
change the location, then they should contact the 
Town manager or himself before the fall meeting. 
John Coppinger said that his main complaint was that 
of comfort, due to the seating. He felt that the meet- 
ings should return to the McCarthy Auditorium. The 
Moderator knew that the only problem with that loca- 
tion was the availability of the microphone. The Mod- 
erator asked for a show of hands on the suggestion of 
the McCarthy Auditorium. Sue Olsen suggested the 
Senior Citizen Center. Again the complaint about the 
hard seats was mentioned. Mary Franz. Chairman of 
the School Committee said that the McCarthy School 
Auditorium is used at this time of the year for the 
High School Musical, therefore it would be unavail- 
able for this time of the year. The Moderator sug- 
gested that perhaps other than the spring meeting, 
the McCarthy could be used. Barbara Ward said it 
mattered on what area the Town Meeting wanted to 
use. the Gym was available. The Moderator said that 
the concern was to use the comfortable seats of the 
Auditorium. Carl Olsson of the School Committee 
wanted to remind the body that Town Meeting takes 
preference over any activity. John Emerson ques- 
tioned if the meeting has to be at McCarthy or is this 



just a consideration of having the meeting at the 
McCarthy. The Moderator explained that he took a 
non-binding question. It is up the Selectmen in the 
end to choose the location. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem 
moved that the Town vote to instruct the Board of 
Assessors to issue the sum of S497. 131.00 from Free 
Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate. 

The Town Manager explained that this is the 
amount of money available in free cash which will be 
used to balance the budget. He asked for support. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Seeing that there was no further business at hand. 
Selectman Jeffrey A. Brem moved to adjourn the 
meeting. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. He reminded the Repre- 
sentatives that the Special Election will be on 
Wednesday. May 27th. The Polls will be open from 12 
noon to 8:00 p.m. The meeting adjourned at 11:05 
p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary 



E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION MAY 27, 1992 



BLANKS 
YES 

NO 
TOTAL 



Pet. 1 


Pet. 2 


Pet. 3 


Pet. 4 


Pet. 5 


Pet. 6 


Pet. 7 


Pet. 8 


Pet. 9 


Total 


3 











1 


1 





2 





7 


349 


295 


447 


432 


432 


488 


434 


367 


396 


3640 


125 


198 


143 


174 


146 


175 


197 


175 


121 


1454 



477 



493 



590 



606 



579 



664 



631 



544 



517 5101 



39 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 

STATE PRIMARY ELECTION 

SEPTEMBER 15, 1992 

MIDDLESEX. SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are 
hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to 
vote at: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Byam School Cafeteria 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Town Office Building Gymnasium 



On Tuesday the fifteenth day of September, 1992 
from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following pur- 
pose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the 
candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS fifth Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR third Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT... fifth Mdlsx. Senatorial District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 

COURT 16th Mdlsx. Representative District 

COUNTY SHERIFF Middlesex County 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Middlesex County 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon at the time and place of 
said election. 

Given under our hands this 17th day of August, 
A.D. 1992. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

William R. Logan, Chairman 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Vice Chairman 

Peter V. Lawlor, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren 

Jeffrey A. Brem 



40 



STATE PRIMARY TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1992 



CANDIDATES DEMOCRAT 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Pet. 4 Pet. 5 Pet. 6 Pet. 7 Pet. 8 Pet. 9 
REPRESENTATIVE FOR CONGRESS 



Total 



Blanks 


1 


2 


3 


7 


5 


4 


5 


3 


5 


35 


Chester G. Atkins 


95 


106 


120 


135 


137 


131 


122 


126 


117 


1089 


Martin T. Meehan 


297 


312 


317 


331 


325 


328 


275 


305 


205 


2695 


Write-ins 





1 


1 


1 








1 


1 





5 


Misc 


1 


1 




















1 


3 


TOTAL 


394 


422 


441 


474 


467 


463 


403 


435 


328 


3827 


COUNCILLOR 






















Blanks 


50 


58 


74 


28 


75 


41 


59 


54 


47 


486 


Robert B. Kennedy 


246 


289 


281 


256 


303 


255 


273 


314 


179 


2396 


Michael J. O'Halloran 


98 


74 


86 


189 


88 


167 


71 


66 


102 


941 


Write-ins 





1 





1 











1 





3 


Misc 














1 














1 


TOTAL 


394 


422 


441 


474 


467 


463 


403 


435 


328 


3827 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 






















Blanks 


316 


345 


379 


408 


396 


389 


346 


371 


275 


3225 


Write-ins 


11 


9 


9 


7 





8 


10 


9 


6 


69 


Misc 


67 


68 


53 


59 


71 


66 


47 


55 


47 


533 


TOTAL 


394 


422 


441 


474 


467 


463 


403 


435 


328 


3827 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 




















Blanks 


322 


359 


386 


416 


418 


405 


358 


384 


290 


3348 


Write-ins 


10 


5 


9 


6 





4 


8 


5 


5 


52 


Misc 


52 


58 


46 


52 


49 


54 


37 


46 


33 


427 


TOTAL 


394 


422 


441 


474 


467 


463 


403 


435 


328 


3827 


SHERIFF 






















Blanks 


168 


176 


186 


162 


207 


195 


175 


192 


154 


1615 


John P. McGonigle 


224 


242 


250 


306 


255 


266 


224 


237 


171 


2175 


Write-ins 


1 


3 


5 


3 








2 








14 


Misc 


1 


1 





3 


5 


2 


2 


6 


3 


23 


TOTAL 


394 


422 


441 


474 


467 


463 


403 


435 


328 


3827 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER 






















Blanks 


210 


181 


226 


201 


231 


200 


189 


191 


179 


1808 


Edward J. Kennedy 


164 


199 


177 


244 


167 


204 


150 


196 


113 


1614 


Thomas J. Larkin 


103 


125 


110 


126 


131 


116 


95 


122 


105 


1033 


Leonard H. Golder 


25 


23 


23 


26 


33 


33 


23 


22 


22 


230 


Albert J. Onessimo 


13 


15 


16 


23 


20 


13 


24 


19 


16 


159 


Dennis J. Ready 


232 


252 


280 


287 


303 


313 


278 


257 


177 


2379 


Adelle Schwalberg 


41 


49 


50 


41 


48 


47 


47 


62 


42 


427 


Write-ins 
































Misc 














1 








1 


2 


4 


TOTAL 


788 


844 


882 


948 


934 


926 


806 


870 


656 


7654 



41 



CANDIDATES REPUBLICAN 



Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Pet. 4 Pet. 5 Pet. 6 Pet. 7 Pet. 8 Pet. 9 Total 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 






















Blanks 


4 


4 


3 


4 


1 


5 


3 


5 


8 


37 


Michael G. Conway 


87 


84 


88 


109 


112 


116 


114 


114 


110 


934 


Paul W. Cronin 


70 


61 


60 


50 


57 


84 


70 


61 


78 


591 


Write-ins 











1 

















1 


Misc 














1 








1 





2 


TOTAL 


161 


149 


151 


164 


171 


205 


187 


181 


196 


1565 


COUNCILLOR 






















Blanks 


38 


39 


41 


54 


45 


52 


72 


50 


68 


459 


Vincent P. McLaughlin 


120 


109 


108 


108 


124 


152 


114 


130 


126 


1091 


Write-ins 


2 





1 


1 





1 











5 


Misc 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 





1 


1 


2 


10 


TOTAL 


161 


149 


151 


164 


171 


205 


187 


181 


196 


1565 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 






















Blanks 


28 


25 


28 


30 


23 


28 


36 


35 


31 


264 


Lucille "Cile" P. Hicks 


129 


123 


123 


132 


146 


177 


149 


143 


164 


1286 


Write-ins 


3 








2 








1 


1 





7 


Misc 


1 
161 


1 
149 



151 



164 


2 
171 



205 


1 
187 


2 
181 


1 
196 


8 


TOTAL 


1565 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 




















Blanks 


22 


23 


24 


30 


32 


27 


34 


27 


32 


251 


Carol C. Cleven 


133 


124 


126 


132 


137 


177 


150 


150 


159 


1288 


Write-ins 


5 


1 


1 


1 





1 


1 





4 


14 


Misc 


1 


1 





1 


2 





2 


4 


1 


12 


TOTAL 


161 


149 


151 


164 


171 


205 


187 


181 


196 


1565 


SHERIFF 






















Blanks 


28 


31 


31 


34 


39 


59 


37 


31 


41 


331 


Gary Buxton 


54 


50 


54 


48 


57 


65 


73 


56 


60 


517 


Michael J. Dever 


57 


45 


44 


57 


56 


55 


50 


66 


75 


505 


Vincent Lawrence Dixon 


22 


23 


21 


24 


19 


26 


27 


28 


19 


209 


Write-ins 








1 


1 

















2 


Misc 


























1 


1 


TOTAL 


161 


149 


151 


164 


171 


205 


187 


181 


196 


1565 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER 






















Blanks 


135 


140 


143 


151 


167 


195 


173 


154 


191 


1449 


Anthony F. Ranieri 


45 


36 


30 


42 


35 


42 


46 


42 


34 


352 


James P. Regan 


77 


59 


61 


67 


76 


87 


79 


87 


91 


684 


Edward L. Weinberg 


63 


63 


67 


68 


61 


86 


76 


79 


76 


639 


Write-ins 


2 





1 




















3 


Misc 














3 














3 


TOTAL 


322 


298 


302 


328 


342 


410 


374 


362 


392 


3130 



42 



CANDIDATES INDEPENDENT VOTERS 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 



Pet. 3 Pet. 4 Pet. 5 Pet. 6 Pet. 7 Pet. 8 Pet. 9 Total 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNCILLOR 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



SHERIFF 

All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 







COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 

All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 






























2 

















10 





2 

















10 



43 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 19, 1992 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 
7:35 p.m. by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, at 
the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium. The Moder- 
ator recognized the presence of a quorum, there were 
150 Town Meeting Representatives present. 

Prior to calling the meeting to order the Modera- 
tor had pointed out the fire exits and explained the 
meeting's procedures. He noted that there were no 
required reports to be made from the spring meeting. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silence for 
Donald Smith, who was a former Selectman, who had 
passed away in July. And for Raymond Day, who had 
passed away a week ago. Mr. Day had been an active 
member of the Town's Celebration Committee, and 
the Civil Defense Committee. 

Selectman Jeffrey Brem, moved that the reading 
of the Constable's return of service and the posting of 
the warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously, 
by show of hands. Selectman Jeffrey Brem moved that 
the reading of the entire warrant be waived. It was so 
voted, unanimously, by show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Catherine Brown, moved 
that the Town vote to form a Committee to study the 
feasibility of forming a Town Meeting Members Asso- 
ciation, and if such an Association is deemed feasible, 
to propose by-laws for said Association. 

The purpose of a Town Meeting Members Associ- 
ation would be for members to acquaint themselves 
more fully with the facts necessary for intelligent deci- 
sions and to assist in any other constructive way in 
the government of Chelmsford. 

The Committee will consist of one Town Meeting 
representative from each precinct. The Committee 
will submit its recommendations to the April 1993 
Town Meeting. 

Catherine Brown explained the purpose of the 
article. Since Representative Town Meeting started 
over two years ago this form of Government was 
doing well. However, she felt that the Representatives 
needed to be more informed in order to vote on 
issues. The Charter mentions that a committee may 
be formed for the purpose of reviewing warrant arti- 
cles. Which is why this article has been proposed. It 
would be treated like the prior Rules Committee. A 
member from each precinct would be chosen, and 
meetings will be held prior to the Town Meeting and 
the Representative will report back to the other 17 
Representatives the results of any discussions or infor- 
mation available on the articles. The Town of Lexing- 
ton has an association and produces positive results. 



Questions were raised and answered. A discussion 
took place. The Finance Committee was not in favor 
of this article. A majority of the Board of Selectmen 
were not in favor of the article. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
defeated . 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Jeffrey Brem 
moved to transfer and appropriate the sum of 
$5,500.00 from Line Item 13 Public Works Expenses 
for the purpose of funding Line Item 19 Cemetery 
Commission Personnel Services Account. 

Bernard Lynch, Town Manager explained that 
this article is to fund the contract negotiations for the 
Cemetery Department. The Highway Division has 
money within the budget. This reflects a 3% increase 
for this year and a 4% for the next two. He stated 
that the elimination of sick time buy-back and the 
longevity issues had been dealt with. There would be 
a capping on the current employees. The results of 
this negotiation would save the Town between 
$75,000. to $100,000. over the term of fifteen to 
twenty years. He asked for support of the article. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Samuel Poulten moved that 
the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 12 
of Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985, the School 
Improvement Act, in relation to the equal education 
opportunity grant in the amount of $17,207. for the 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School for the 1992- 
1993 school year. 

Samuel Poulten, a member of the Nashoba School 
Committee explained the article. The Board of Select- 
men and the Finance Committee supported the arti- 
cle. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Jeffrey Brem 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Section 48 of Chapter 133 of the Acts of 1992, an Act 
concerning Early Retirement Incentive. 

Bernard Lynch, Town Manager explained that 
this would allow the Town to offer an early retire- 
ment incentive to the employees. This is what corpo- 
rations have been doing. The plan would be to down 
size by either eliminating positions, or bring in people 
at a reduced pay scale to fill positions, consolidate 
offices if necessary, a savings would be seen. He feels 
that there may be at least thirty people who may take 
advantage of this on the Town side. This law does not 
include any school department personnel. In order to 
be eligible an employee must be 55 years of age and 
ten years of service, or no age requirement and 
twenty years of service. The incentive is five years 
would be added to age or years of service to the 



44 



employee. Or the employee could choose to split the 
five years in a way that would be beneficial to them. 

Ed Hilliard asked the time frame. The Manager 
explained that special legislation is needed which will 
take place later in the year, because the Town is a 
member of the Middlesex County Retirement. There 
is a slight discrepancy in the law which affects the 
funding. Once this is taken care of. there is a time 
factor of forty-five days. The Board of Selectmen must 
officially vote to accept this process, then clock starts 
running and any employee must file their papers, 
within the forty- five days. Everything must be com- 
pleted by July 15. 1993. So the process must start no 
later than June 1st. He anticipated having it in place 
for the 1994 budget. 

Joel Karp asked what was the cost factor. The 
Manager explained that between 5100,000. to 
$125,000. would be spent. The result would be over a 
fifteen year span a savings of $250,000. is anticipated. 
The employees with many years in service are paid a 
higher percentage at the time of retirement. New 
hired employees would be paid less. Surrounding 
towns are accepting this law. A discussion took place. 
The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation, the Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. The Board of Selectmen recom- 
mended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried. 

U NDER ARTICLE 5 James Good. Chairman of 
the Planning Board, moved that the Town vote to 
amend the zoning by-law under Article I Administra- 
tion and Procedure Section 1300 Board of Appeals 
Subsection 1322 as follows: 

From: 

1322. To hear and decide appeals or petitions for 
the variances from the terms of this by-law 
with respect to particular land or structures. 
Such variance shall be granted only in case of 
where the Board of Appeals find all of the fol- 
lowing: 

To: 

1322. To hear and decide appeals or petitions for 
the variances from the terms of this by-law, 
including variances for use, with respect to 
particular land or structures. Such variance 
shall be granted only in case of where the 
Board of Appeals find all of the following: 

James Good. Chairman of the Planning Board 
read the Board's recommendation. The Planning 
Board held a public hearing on the above mentioned 
article on September 9. 1992. At that meeting, the 
Planning Board closed the Public Hearing and voted 
(6-1) in favor of recommending to Town Meeting a 
zoning change in the zoning by-laws under Section 
1322 as written in the warrant for the Fall Annual 



Town Meeting, 1992. 

Donald Ayer asked if this article will affect any of 
the articles appearing after this article. James Harring- 
ton Town Counsel, explained that this article will 
allow the Board of Appeals to grant Use Variances. 
According to the present zoning by-laws, they are not 
allowed to do so, the Board had this option in the 
past. He explained the difference between a Special 
Permit, Variance, both are granted by the Board of 
Appeals, and a Use Variance. A Special Permit if 
granted is allowed only as long as the petitioner is 
owner of the property. A Variance deals with the 
dimensions of the property, setbacks of sideyards, 
frontage etc. A Use Variance is to allow the (Zoning) 
Use of the property to be changed. Either Variance 
once granted is a permanent change to the land. He 
gave an example. If a property is zoned for one spe- 
cific use and a petitioner wants to change it to 
another use, the Board of Appeals previously was 
allowed to view this matter and make sure a hardship 
does in fact exist and that all requirements are met 
and if so vote to allow the change to take place. 
When did the Board of Appeals lose the right to stop 
granting Use Variances? 

James Good explained that this was eliminated in 
the 1986 Masterplan. What has been done since then? 
Town Counsel explained that now the only way 
someone would be allowed to change the use of the 
land is to come to the Planning Board and petition for 
a zoning change. Regardless of the size of the parcel 
of land. A public hearing is conducted and the Plan- 
ning Board makes a recommendation, but before the 
petitioner can begin anything, an additional vote 
must be done at Town Meeting, then it is sent to the 
Attorney General for approval. This is known as spot 
zoning. If the process is done through the Board of 
Appeals as in the past, the neighbors concerns are 
expressed and taken into consideration by the Board 
of Appeals. After a decision is made and filed by the 
Board of Appeals there is a twenty-one day appealing 
process. Anyone can file with the court system an 
appeal, and the court could over turn the decision if 
just cause is found. However, once a zoning change is 
voted by the Town Meeting Body, there is no appeal 
process and the change is done. Robert Kydd, Chair- 
man of the Board of Appeals explained why the 
Board felt that this article should be approved. More 
discussion took place. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. A majority of the Board of Select- 
men recommended the article. James Creegan, mem- 
ber of the Planning Board spoke against the article, 
and made a presentation. He felt that major policy 
changes shouldn't be made to handle limited circum- 
stances. He felt that all elected officials which 
includes the Town Meeting Representatives shouldn't 
be eliminated from the process in making a decision. 
There is a potential to over commercialize the Town 
in the future, which is one of his biggest concerns. He 
asked that the article be defeated. Donald Ayer spoke 



45 



against the article. He felt that there are areas in the 
Westlands which could be affected by a Use Variance. 
The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion defeated. 

UNDER A R TICLE 6 Barry Bell moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to petition the 
Legislature to enact the following legislation: 

Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or 
special law to the contrary, the Town of Chelmsford 
is hereby authorized to provide the same health insur- 
ance coverage to an elected or appointed official of 
said Town, whether or not said official receives com- 
pensation for such position, as is provided to other 
town employees; provided, however, that if such an 
elected or appointed official, who is not a municipal 
employee, elects to participate in the health insurance 
plan of said town, he shall pay one hundred percent 
of the cost of such health insurance coverage. Said 
Town may authorize the payment of a stipend for any 
such elected or appointed position, if it deems it nec- 
essary to effectuate the intent of this section. 

Provided further that the Legislature may reason- 
ably vary the form and substance of the requested 
legislation with the scope of the general public objec- 
tives of this petition. 

Barbara Quinn the proponent of the article 
explained the purpose of the article. She wanted to 
file a homerule petition. This would enable all elected 
and appointed officials a chance to join the Town's 
group health plan. It will not cost the Town any 
money. The person pays all costs, 100%. They would 
be allowed a lower premium rate by being in a group 
rather than pay a higher individual rate. A discussion 
took place. Concerns were expressed that if this was 
allowed then individuals may be eligible for other 
benefits such as retirement. Town Counsel explained 
that this would not entitle anyone to retirement bene- 
fits, only a lower rate for insurance premiums. A dis- 
cussion took place. The Finance Committee and 
Board of Selectmen were against the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Dennis Ready moved that 
the Town vote to amend the zoning by-law under 
Article II District Regulations Section 2300 Use Regu- 
lations Schedule as follows: 

Under the category of Restaurant, areas zoned IA 
(Limited Industrial District) a change from O (an 
excluded or prohibited use) to BA (a use authorized 
under special permit from the Board of Appeals) . 

Dennis Ready explained the article. This would 
allow restaurant uses allowed by a Special Permit 
issued by the Board of Appeals, in the areas zoned 
Limited Industrial District. This would allow restau- 



rants to operate in Industrial zones. He showed a pre- 
sentation which outlined all the industrial zones that 
this amendment would affect. He felt that many of 
the industrial areas needed to have a restaurant in 
their immediate area. It would encourage more busi- 
nesses to move into the industrial area if they were 
able to have a shared cafeteria which could also be 
termed as a restaurant. Questions were asked con- 
cerning what is termed a restaurant. Could any fast 
food place be considered a restaurant. Yes it could be. 
however the Board of Appeals would make the deci- 
sion. Donald Ayer questioned the neighborhood areas 
that have IA zone located in them. Turnpike Road 
and Riverneck Road. Again the Board of Appeals 
would make the decision. A number of questions 
were asked and answered concerning the areas 
involved, the possibility of obtaining liquor licenses. 
Concerns were expressed about the Board of Appeals 
granting or not granting the Special Permit. If they do 
not grant to a fast food restaurant even though the 
petitioner meets all the requirements what could hap- 
pen. James Harrington, Town Counsel, explained that 
Town could be taken to court and in fact the decision 
could be reversed and a fast food restaurant could 
open. The Finance Committee recommended against 
the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended 
against the article. James Good read the Planning 
Board's recommendation. The Planning Board held a 
Public Hearing on the above mentioned article on 
September 9, 1992. At that meeting, the Board voted 
to approve (4-2) the zoning by-law change with the 
following changes and amendments: 

1. Eliminate the entire category of Retail Stores 
and Services. 

2. Eliminate the entire category of Indoor Com- 
mercial Recreation and; 

3. Change under the category of Restaurant 
from P4 (permitted use, except "BA" if result- 
ing in more than 10,000 sq. feet gross floor 
area devoted to business uses on the 
premises) to BA (Board of Appeals Approval). 

Attorney Joseph Shanahan representing twenty to 
thirty business people in the center area spoke against 
the article. In these economic hard times, the business 
people felt that this zoning change would be unjust to 
them at this time. The low occupancy of the buildings 
in the route 129 industrial area were starting to turn 
around. The businesses in the center had in fact been 
effected with the slow down and now felt their busi- 
nesses soon would pick up, due to interest in this 
industrial area starting again. He in fact represented a 
major business who is moving into this industrial 
area, and they did not express any concerns whatso- 
ever about there not being any type of restaurant 
available in the immediate area for their use. They felt 
that what is presently located within the area would 
serve them well. 



46 



Roger Blomgren made a motion to move the 
question. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
on the motion to stop debate. Motion carried, unani- 
mously. He then asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands on the article as presented. Motion defeated. 

The Moderator started to read Article 8. Select- 
man Logan made a point of order. He said that the 
Board of Selectmen wanted to postpone the article 
until after Article 18. The Moderator explained that 
once he was done reading the article, he would 
acknowledge Selectman Logan's request. He contin- 
ued to read the article. Chairman Logan then 
explained that the Board of Selectmen and the Con- 
servation Commission had received numerous phone 
calls and felt that the discussion was going to be 
longer than forty minutes. Due to the anticipated dis- 
cussion it was felt that it would be best to take the 
article out of order and address it after Article 18. 
The Finance Committee was against the motion to 
take the article out of order. Selectman DeFreitas 
stated that he was personally against postponing dis- 
cussion. He asked if the Chairman would consider 
making the article the first one acted upon when the 
Town Meeting reconvenes next Monday, October 
26th. The Chairman agreed. Selectman Jeffrey Brem 
moved to postpone Article 8 to be taken up as the 
first order of business at the adjourned session of 
Town Meeting, of October 26th. The Finance Com- 
mittee questioned if the meeting was going to adjourn 
because Article 9's discussion could in fact be longer 
than forty minutes. No answer could be given. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of postponing Article 
8. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
motion to postpone Article 8. Motion carried. Barry 
Balan then moved to adjourn the Town Meeting until 
Monday, October 26, 1992 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
McCarthy Middle School Auditorium. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen were in favor 
of the motion to adjourn. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to adjourn, motion car- 
ried. The meeting adjourned at 10:30 p.m. 



hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to 
vote at: 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 

STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 3, 1992 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Byam School Cafeteria 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Town Office Building Gymnasium 



On Tuesday the third of November, 1992 from 
7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

1) To cast their votes in the State Election for the 
candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

ELECTORS OF THE PRESIDENT 

AND VICE PRESIDENT for the Commonwealth 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT... fifth Mdlsx. Senatorial District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 

COURT 16th Mdlsx. Representative District 

COUNTY SHERIFF Middlesex County 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Middlesex County 

2) To vote on the following questions: 

#1. Tax on Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco 

#2. Public Reporting of Corporate Tax Informa- 
tion 

#3. Requiring Reduced, Reusable or Recyclable 
Packaging 

#4. Tax on Oils and Hazardous Materials 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon at the time and place of 
said election. 

Given under our hands this 14th day of October, 
A.D. 1992. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

William R. Logan, Chairman 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Vice Chairman 

Peter V. Lawlor, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren 

Jeffrey A. Brem 



In the name of the Commonwealth you are 



47 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

OCTOBER 26, 1992 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called 
to order at 7:35 p.m. by the Moderator Dennis E. 
McHugh, at the McCarthy Middle School Audito- 
rium. The Moderator recognized the presence of a 
quorum, there were 140 Town Meeting Representa- 
tives present. He then read a few announcements 
concerning absentee voting for the November 3rd 
election, and the hours for Halloween on October 
31st. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Jeffrey Brem 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General 
Bylaws Article VI Police Regulations Section 22 Prohi- 
bition of Trapping by Means of the Leghold and 
Conibear Trap by deleting Section 22 which reads as 
follows in its entirety: 

SECTION 22 PROHIBITION OF TRAPPING BY 
MEANS OF THE LEGHOLD AND 
CONIBEAR TRAP 

1. It shall be prohibited and unlawful for any 
person to set, trigger, activate, or otherwise 
use or cause to be set, triggered, activated or 
used any type or modification of any steel 
jawed, leghold trap including the soft catch 
trapping system, or any form of jaw trap or 
conibear trap, for the capture of any animal. 

2. The definitions set forth in General Law 
Chapter 131, Section 1 of "to trap", as said 
act applies to fur bearing mammals, are incor- 
porated herewithin. 

3. The Police Department and or Animal Con- 
trol Officer of Chelmsford shall be authorized 
to enforce this by-law pursuant to Article 1 of 
Town of Chelmsford General By-laws. 

4. The fine for each violation of this section shall 
be Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00), with 
each violation constituting a separate offense. 
Said violations shall be punishable as pro- 
vided in Article 1 of Town of Chelmsford By- 
laws. 

5. Notwithstanding the provisions of this by- 
law, the Conservation Commission or their 
authorized agents may use such traps and 
may destroy any fur-bearing mammals subject 
to regulation herein, if the Conservation 
Commission determines that such animals 
pose a substantial present or potential hazard 
to public health, welfare, safety, or to the 
environment. 



Selectman Peter Lawlor spoke about the article. In 
prior years trapping was allowed in Town, now trap- 
ping is presently allowed in the Town only with the 
permission of the Conservation Commission. Susan 
Olsen asked what has the Conservation Commission 
done in maintaining the control of the beaver popula- 
tion? Susan Carter, Chairman of the Conservation 
Commission explained that up until recently there has 
not been much activity by the Conservation Commis- 
sion in regards to the issue. The Friends of the Ani- 
mal Association had come forward and did presenta- 
tions, and offered assistance, but nothing has been 
done to solve the problem. Since coming on the 
Board a year ago, there has been two meetings and 
the Board tried to reach solutions with the residents 
and the state. The Board voted to allow duly licensed 
trappers as its agents to trap beavers with the Town 
between November 15, 1992 and February 28, 1993 
subject to having written permission of the land- 
owner. Beaver pipes have been installed at some sites. 
Sue Olsen then asked the Friends of the Animals 
what they have done to help the Town with this 
problem. Kathleen Hillman came forward and said 
that she was not speaking for the Friends of the Ani- 
mals. She would try to explain their position. They 
were not here tonight, they have to come from New 
Jersey. As long as the by-law exists, they offer sup- 
port and financial support if necessary. A letter was 
available explaining some of the people and the 
obstacles they had encountered when they did come 
to Chelmsford. Questions were raised about the 
state's trapping rules and regulations, in regards to 
raccoons. The Conservation Commission was not in 
favor of deleting the by-law, they believed that if they 
allowed control trapping on a yearly basis when nec- 
essary as it was for this year, that this would eventu- 
ally bring a solution to the problem. It would allow 
landowners the right to grant permission to have trap- 
pers come onto their property where a problem exists 
during the trapping seasons. Questions were raised 
concerning the safety of the water wells. Ronald Wet- 
more Center Water Commissioner, said that a prob- 
lem still does exist. A question was asked about the 
court injunction concerning the use certain traps. 
Susan Carter said that a representative from the State 
Office was present and could answer any questions. 
Dr. Robert DeBlinger, Director of Wildlife Research of 
Mass. Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, came for- 
ward. The Moderator asked the Town Meeting Repre- 
sentatives for a vote by way of a show of hands, in 
order to allow Dr. DeBlinger to speak before the 
Body. Motion carried. Dr. DeBlinger explained that 
there was litigation regarding the soft catch trap. In 
1990 a Middlesex Superior Court Judge refrained the 
operation of regulation governing use of the soft catch 
trap. A question was asked about the leghold trap. 
The leghold trap is used only for trapping under 
water. Susan Gates asked if this by-law is deleted 
what happens. Sue Carter explained that once this by- 
law is eliminated then the State has control through 
twenty-three different laws on trapping. The Town 



48 



will have no say whatsoever. Dr. DeBlinger answered 
more questions from the Town Meeting Representa- 
tives. Kathleen Hillman asked why in the Western 
part of the state where trapping was allowed accord- 
ing to statistics there was a lot more complaints about 
beaver problems. Dr. DeBlinger explained that she 
was comparing many towns in the Western part of 
the State. When you look at the town by town list of 
complaints, Chelmsford is the highest. Selectman 
Blomgren wanted to hear from the Board of Health 
about the problem. Richard Day, Director of the 
Board of Health, said that at this time no public 
health emergency has been declared. Dr. DeBlinger 
explained that most trappers will not go into an area 
to trap if any type of by-law exists, regardless if the 
Conservation Commission or the owner of the land 
grants permission. Susan Carter explained that if the 
landowner has a problem with a beaver dam that per- 
mission from the state must be given before a dam 
can be broken. If this by-law is eliminated then peo- 
ple must post their property in order to avoid any 
type of trapping on it. Sue Olsen asked what has the 
State done to help the situation. There are seventeen 
different sites that the State had evaluated. Beaver 
pipes were recommended for four of the sites, nine 
permits to break beaver dams have been issued. More 
questions were asked. The Moderator asked for differ- 
ent committees recommendations. Cheryl Boss, 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, said that the 
Committee voted at their meeting prior to the Town 
Meeting to withdraw their recommendation because 
they didn't realize at the time of their original vote, 
the Conservation Commission had not made their 
recommendation known, and they wanted to hear all 
the information. The Board of Selectmen were not in 
favor of the article. The Conservation Commission 
was not in favor of the article. David McLachlan a 
member of the Conservation Commission explained 
that he has been on the Board for four years, and 
that the present by-law was in effect during this time. 
It's purpose he believes was for homerule control of 
trapping laws, and possible concerns of the philoso- 
phy of trapping itself. Last year the problems with 
beavers came to the attention of the Conservation 
Commission. The Board then seriously started to 
address the issue. The solution that the Commission 
is offering is only a start, but he feels that the Town 
should allow the Commission to attempt to resolve 
the issue by granting permission to trappers, rather 
than eliminate the by-law completely. He asked for 
defeat of the article. Sue Olsen spoke in favor of the 
article. She felt that the Conservation Commission 
has had plenty of time and opportunity to control the 
situation and this has not been done. Bradford Emer- 
son made a motion to move the question and stop 
debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
which left the Chair in doubt. A Vs's or unanimous 
vote is needed. The following tellers came forward 
and conducted a hand count: 

Jean Organ, Patricia Plank, Dorothy Frawley and 



Lucy Simonian. The result was yes 74 No 40 2 /Vs is 
76, the motion is defeated and the debate continued. 

Harry Foster spoke in favor of the article. A num- 
ber of High School students came forth and spoke 
against the article. Joseph Paolilli asked permission to 
allow Bill Andre of the Trapper's Association to 
speak. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. Bill Andre then explained the trap- 
pers views. He said that the Trappers Association 
members would not go into any town which was not 
under the sole guidance of the State's rules and regu- 
lations. These are strictly the only rules that the asso- 
ciation maintains and follows. More discussion took 
place. A number of Representatives spoke in favor of 
the article. Dr. DeBlinger was asked for the State's 
recommendation on the matter. He read a statement 
which said that the by-law should be eliminated. 
There are twenty-three State laws all ready in effect 
that had cited specific rules and regulations in regards 
to trapping beavers. The State also felt that the use of 
beaver pipes should be implemented as another 
means of control. More discussion took place. 
Michael Anthony made a motion to move the ques- 
tion to stop debate. Kathleen Hillman wanted the 
body to realize that another speaker was now avail- 
able to speak. The Moderator explained to her that 
the only motion he could entertain at the moment 
was the motion to stop debate. If the body wanted to 
hear more information then they could defeat the 
motion to stop debate and continue with the discus- 
sion. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion to stop debate, which must be either a 
unanimous or 2 /Vs vote. After a few attempts, the 
motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on the article, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 James Good, Chairman of 
the Planning Board, moved that the Town vote to 
amend the existing Town of Chelmsford Zoning Map 
by removing the following described property consist- 
ing of 21.802 acres of land on Mill Road from Limited 
Industrial District (IA) and placing said property in a 
Residential Multi-Family District (RM). (See Meets 
and Bounds Description and Plan of Land attached 
hereto and incorporated herein.) 

Commencing at a point on the Easterly sideline of 
Mill Road, being the zone line between the RB zone 
and Zone IA; thence 



Southeasterly 



1129.22 feet to a point, being the 
Town Line as shown on the 1954 
State Highway Layout; thence, in two 
courses, 931.18 feet to a point, being 
Route 3 on the State Highway layout 
of 1954; thence, 



Northwesterly in two courses, 599.34 feet to a point, 
thence, 



49 



Westerly 391.48 feet to a point on the South- 

easterly side of Mill Road, thence, 

Southwesterly along the southeasterly side line of 
Mill Road to the point of beginning. 

The herein described parcel of land containing 
21,802 acres of land and being shown as Lot 2 (10.470 
acres), Lot 3 (10.780 acres) and proposed Quorum 
Way (0.552 acres) on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan 
of Land in Chelmsford, MA prepared for Raymond A. 
& Barbara F. Carye, revised May 7, 1984 and 
approved by the Chelmsford Planning Board on July 
12, 1984; or act in relation thereto. 

Attorney James Geary stated he was representing 
the McBride and Wildes families known as HRM 
McBride Associates. He introduced the members pre- 
sent, Bob, Jack and Ann McBride, Bob Wildes, Mike 
Salmon, Marketing, and Scott Parker, Architect. He 
asked that they be granted permission to speak from 
time to time if necessary about the article. The Mod- 
erator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
Attorney Geary went on to explain the article. The 
McBride and Wildes family has been building homes 
and apartments in Chelmsford since the 1950 's. Bob 
McBride and Bob Wildes would be the principal buy- 
ers of the land from Raymond and Barbara Carye. 
Presently this would involve twenty-two acres of land 
off of Mill Road which abuts Route 3. Also three acres 
located in Billerica which can only be accessed 
through this land. It would contain eighty-six units of 
single detached homes. The permit process would 
begin in early 1993, and hopefully completed by the 
middle of the year. And then construction would 
start, an approximate construction time was one and 
half years. Everything should be in place and occu- 
pied by 1996. Due to present zone being industrial 
and no prospect for the zone it was felt that this was 
a good alternative. Due to the land directly abutting 
residential homes this too is a consideration. After 
talking with the neighborhood it was found that this 
choice was favored. There would be less noise, less 
impact to the environment, be able to preserve the 
present stream and keep ten acres of open space 
available. The developer would bear the cost of the 
twelve inch water pipe into the site. There would be 
no significant cost to the Town. The streets and side- 
walks will be maintained by the complex. A culdesac 
would be built to accommodate the School Buses. 
This will be done on the private part of the road. The 
streets will be five hundred feet long. The lot size is 
56' x 90'. The cost would be $125,000. to $150,000. 
The average purchase price would be $130,000. Scott 
Parker made a presentation showing the overhead 
view of the property, the individual homes, and the 
open area. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. Due to a tie vote and 
there being a missing member, the Board could not 
make a recommendation at this time. The majority of 
the Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. 



James Good read the Planning Board's recommenda- 
tion: 

The Planning Board held a Public Hearing on the 
above mentioned article on September 9, 1992. At 
that meeting, the public hearing was closed. On Sep- 
tember 23, 1992 at a regularly scheduled meeting, the 
Planning Board voted unanimously (6-0) (one member 
absent) to recommend the Zoning Map change of 
21.802 acres from Limited Industrial (IA) to Residen- 
tial Multi-Family (RM) to Town Meeting. 

A discussion began. Ed Hilliard questioned the 
size of the lot. Cheryl Warshafsky questioned the 
need for another condo complex. She felt that once 
these units are built, if not all the units are filled then 
the people occupying must pay the association fee's. 
There now are a few complexes who are having finan- 
cial problems and the fee's are not being made and 
the buildings aren't being maintained. Questions were 
asked concerning the number of school children who 
may go into the system, the South Row School is near 
maximum capacity now. It was mentioned in the pre- 
sentation that approximately forty children would be 
expected. Dr. Moser explained this was a low figure 
to use and said what the projected impact could be. 
More discussion took place concerning the fact that 
eighty-six units were going to be on in reality only 
twelve acres of land. A number of Representatives 
spoke against the article. Dennis Ready moved the 
question to stop debate. The Moderator asked if there 
was any need to hear further debate. Hearing none he 
asked for a vote on the article by way of a show of 
hands, motion defeated. 

Selectman Jeffrey Brem moved to adjourn the 
meeting until Thursday, October 29, at 7:30 p.m. at 
the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium. Motion car- 
ried. The meeting adjourned at 11:05 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 29, 1992 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 
7:45 p.m. by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, at 
the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium. The Moder- 
ator recognized the presence of a quorum, there were 
123 Town Meeting Representatives present. 

Selectman Jeffrey Brem, moved that the reading 
of the Constable's return of service and the posting of 
the warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously, 
by show of hands. Selectman Jeffrey Brem moved that 
the reading of the warrant be waived. It was so voted, 
unanimously, by show of hands. 



50 



UNDER ARTICLE 1 The Moderator read the arti- 
cle to the body. Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
moved to see if the Town would vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer and appropriate from available 
funds, a certain sum of money for the purpose of 
funding line item 8 Public Safety Salary Account; or 
act in relation thereto. Selectman Jeffrey Brem moved 
to withdraw the article. The Town manager Bernard 
Lynch explained. The purpose was to transfer money 
for the funding of the Fire Contract. The money now 
will be taken out of the present budget. Due to the 
prior contract certain monies had been built into this 
year's budget. Now that the new contract had been 
negotiated there is extra money available. He 
explained the different changes. The elimination of 
triple time for holidays is now back to double time. 
Longevity has been changed to a flat amount not a 
percentage. The issue of sick time buy-back has been 
addressed. Also the elimination of the minimal man- 
ning clause. There will not be as much money paid in 
overtime. This is a three year contract. This year a 
one-time bonus payment of $750.00 for buy-back of 
benefits will not be added to the base. Next year will 
reflect a 4% increase and the following year a 5% 
increase. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Commit- 
tee's recommendation on the motion to withdraw the 
article. The Finance Committee recommended the 
motion. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands on the motion, motion carried. 

The Moderator adjourned the Special Town Meet- 
ing seeing that there was no further business at hand 
at 7:50 p.m., and proceeded with the Adjourned 
Annual Town Meeting. He made a few announce- 
ments again concerning the hours for Halloween and 
absentee voting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Jeffrey Brem 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. 
Chapter 30B for consideration to be determined, all 
right, title and interest, if any held by the Town, in a 
certain parcel of land off Dalton Road, shown as Lot 
17 on Assessor's Map 94, containing 24,390 square 
feet more or less and more fully described in the Final 
Decree of the Land Court dated November 26, 1991 
and recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry 
of Deeds in Book 5793, Page 265. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained the arti- 
cle. The land is off of Linwood Street. It is a landlock 
parcel of land. It is 24,000 sq. feet with an assessed 
value of $17,600.00. He would notify the abutters of 
the availability of the land. He had on file some let- 
ters of interest already concerning the land. It would 
go to the highest bidder. The Moderator asked for the 



Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article, as did the 
Board of Selectmen. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unani- 
mously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Jeffrey Brem, 
moved to vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 30B, for 
consideration to be determined, all right, title and 
interest, if any held by the Town, in a certain parcel 
of land on Main Street. Shown as Lot 11 Assessor's 
Map 196, containing 3,030 square feet more or less 
and more fully described in a deed recorded in the 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 
2224, Page 3761. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that 
there were already two parties of interest concerning 
this land, which abuts Main Street and Leedberg 
Street. It has an assessed value of $4,900.00. There 
are no buildings on the land. It will go through either 
the bidding process or auction. Both the Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen were in favor 
of the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Jeffrey Brem 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. 
Chapter 30B, for consideration to be determined, all 
right, title and interest, if any held by the town in a 
certain parcel of land off Billerica Road, shown as Lot 
58 on Assessor's Map 129, containing 9,158 square 
feet more or less and described in the Final Decree of 
the Land Court dated June 15, 1984 and recorded in 
the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 2854, Page 194. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
is land locked property off of Billerica Road and abuts 
Grove Street. It has an assessed value of $30,800.00. 
It will be put out to competitive bid. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Town Man- 
ager said that there was a right of way into the land. 
The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 John Emerson moved that 
the Town vote to release all its right, title and interest 
in the unconstructed portions of the following streets 
and ways shown as Ninth Avenue. Tenth Avenue, 
Eleventh Avenue, Twelfth Avenue, Thirteenth 
Avenue, Fourteenth Avenue, and three unnamed 
streets sometime known as Florence Road, Marion 
Road, and Murphy Street all as shown on a plan of 
land entitled "Plan of Building Lots, Crystal Lake 
Park, North Chelmsford" dated May 1926, and 
revised October, 1926 and May, 1927 by Brooks Jor- 
dan and Graves, Engineers and recorded in Middle- 



51 



sex North District Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 50 
Plan 85. Meaning and intending to release those por- 
tions of said streets and ways as now contained 
within a subdivision known as Crystal Estates as 
shown on a plan of land entitled "Definitive Plan of 
Land in Chelmsford, Mass. of Crystal Estates" dated 
July 24, 1987 by Robert M. Gill and Associates Inc. 
Civil Engineers and Land Surveyors and recorded in 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Plan 
Book 168, Plan 68. 

Attorney John Coddaire, representing the Lawyers 
Title Insurance co. explained the article. The purpose 
was to ask the Town to give up any claim that the 
Town had concerning streets that were never con- 
structed, they only appear on paper, commonly 
known as paper streets. This article is to clear up a 
possible title problem. These streets are located on a 
plan entitled Crystal Estates Subdivision, dated 1926. 
Which is located off of Twiss Road via to Waterford 
Place, a street that was accepted half way down as an 
accepted street last year at town meeting. Located 
there is the nineteen lot subdivision. Already nine 
houses have been built and are occupied. Due to the 
title description listing the meets and bounds of these 
paper streets unless waivers are obtained, whoever 
owns the lots have the right of passage over the land. 
There are four lots that are Town owned due to tax 
title. He had waivers from the residents in the area. 
Now he was asking the Town to waive its rights. 
Questions were asked concerning the waivers. Did 
Attorney Coddaire actually have signed waivers from 
the residents? Yes he did. Cheryl Boss of the Finance 
Committee tried to clarify the request. All the Town 
was doing was giving up rights to something that 
does not exist physically only on paper. If someone 
was to go out and view the area all they would find 
was grass, trees, and houses, etc. on the property 
now. This was exactly so. More discussion took place. 
Had the site plan approval been met? Jim Pearson, 
Town Engineer said that all requirements had been 
met. The Moderator asked for the Finance Commit- 
tee's recommendation. The Finance Committee had 
no recommendation. The Board of Selectmen were in 
favor of the article. The Moderator attempted for a 
unanimous vote by a show of hands. This failed, the 
following tellers came forwarded and counted a hand 
count. Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simon- 
ian and Jean Horgan. A 2 A's vote is required, the 
result was Yes 93 No 3, the motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Selectman Jeffrey Brem 
moved to waive the reading of this article. James 
Sousa, Deputy Fire Chief, came forward and 
explained that the wording of this article was exactly 
from the State's Fire Preventions Regulations. Which 
is law. If any attempt is made to amend or change it 
then it will run the possibility of not being accepted. 
The Moderator asked for vote to waive the reading by 
a show of hands on the motion. Motion carried. 



James Sousa then explained the purpose of the 
article. By having the Town accept the present State's 
Regulations, as a by-law this would enable the actual 
enforcement of the law at a local level. A discussion 
took place. Questions were asked concerning Section 
14 Fire Permits. Bernard Ready moved to delete Sec- 
tion 14 Fire Permits in its entirety. He felt that this 
may be too restrictive, he questioned who was to 
decide what was considered a hazard and issue fines. 
Deputy Sousa explained that good sense would be 
used in making any type of determination. He 
explained that there certainly are instances where he 
has answered a complaint made by a resident about a 
neighbor's pile of brush, and did indeed find a haz- 
ard. Or he has gone to a company's site and found 
potential problems. This section was definitely needed 
and urged that it not be deleted. The Moderator 
asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. 
The Finance Committee did not recommend the 
motion to delete Section 14. The Board of Selectmen 
were not in favor of the motion. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by a show of hands, motion defeated. More 
discussion took place. Jeffrey Brem moved to amend 
Section 14 Fire Permits, by deleting 2) Violations in its 
entirety and replace it with: 

a) Any person who violates this Section will be 
warned by a written notice by the Fire Chief 
or his Representative. A second violation 
within any twelve months period shall be 
punishable by a fine of no more than one 
hundred dollars ($100.00) for each offense. 
Each day that a violation continues shall con- 
stitute a separate offense. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation on the motion to amend. The Com- 
mittee had no recommendation. The Board of Select- 
men recommended the motion. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried. 
He then asked for a vote by way of a show of hands 
on the main motion as amended, motion carried. The 
article reads as follows: 

James A. Sousa moved that the Town vote to 
amend the General By-Laws Article XIV Fire By-Laws 
by adding Section 13. Transportation of Flammable 
Liquids by a Cargo Tank, and Section 14 Fire Permits 
as follows: 

SECTION 13 TRANSPORTATION OF FLAM- 
MABLE LIQUIDS BY A CARGO 
TANK 

1) CARGO TANK 

A) No cargo tank shall be used for the trans- 
portation of any Class A or Class B flammable 
liquid or flammable gas unless the same has 
been approved and a certificate of approval 
issued therefore but the Marshal, head of the 



52 



Fire Department or his designee. Such certificate or 
approved identification plate shall be located as 
directed by the Marshal. 

B) Application for approval of a cargo tank shall 
be made to the Marshal, head of the Fire 
Department or his designee on a form fur- 
nished by the Department giving such infor- 
mation in full as requested on form or such 
other information as he may deem necessary. 

C) The certificate of approval as herein provided 
for shall serve as a permit to transport flam- 
mable fluids or gases for a period not to 
exceed two years. All certificates of approval 
shall expire on August 31, 1994 and on each 
even number year thereafter. 

2) TRANSPORTATION OF FLAMMABLE LIQ- 
UIDS 

A) No person shall transport by cargo tank or 
transport vehicle, any combustible liquid 
within the Commonwealth unless such liquid 
is transported in accordance with the require- 
ments of 527 CMR 8.00 

B) No person shall deliver any combustible liq- 
uid by any vehicle, except to transfer to 
another vehicle, unless the person, firm, or 
corporation receiving such liquids exhibits a 
permit/license for the store of such liquids. 

3) TRANSPORTATION BY OTHER METHODS 

A) Any Class A or Class B flammable liquid 
transported by other than tank vehicle or pipe 
vehicle or as otherwise permitted by Subsec- 
tion B and C below shall be transported in 
approved safety cans, substantial metal drums 
or other similar container, with all openings 
thereto tightly closed, except that the provi- 
sions of this section need not apply to any 
Class B liquid in an amount not exceeding 55 
gallons. Gasoline or other Class A petroleum 
product may be transported without a permit 
in any open vehicle or in a compartment of a 
closed vehicle separated from the passengers, 
in total quantity not to exceed 21 gallons, 
provided such flammable liquid is contained 
in one or more suitable metal or plastic con- 
tainers which have been approved by the 
Marshal. No such container shall have a 
capacity of over 7 gallons. 

B) Vehicles other than approved tank vehicles 
may transport combustible liquids in transfer 
tanks proved that an application has been 
made and a permit to transport has been 
issued in accordance with 527 CMR 8.04. The 
vehicle shall be approved for the transporta- 



tion of the combustible liquid provided that: 

Upon satisfactory proof of need and assur- 
ance that the tank has been designed and 
mounted in accordance with these regula- 
tions, a FP44 permit will be issued and a 
decal affixed to the tank in accordance with 
527 CMR 8.00. Board of Fire Prevention Reg- 
ulations. The vehicle shall be approved for 
the transportation of the flammable fluid pro- 
vided that: 

1) The tank is securely mounted to the vehi- 
cle body or truck bed and its capacity 
does not exceed 119 gallons; 

2) The tank shall be constructed of not less 
than 12 USS gauge standard open hearth 
steel plate; 

3) The liquid is drawn from the top of the 
tank by means of a suitable pump to 
which is attached a durable hose 
equipped with an approved self-closing 
nozzle; 

4) All openings in the tank are secured by 
plugs or caps maintained wrench tight 
while vehicle is in transit; 

5) The vehicle is equipped with one or more 
fire extinguishers having a combined rat- 
ing of 2A 20BC; 

6) Permit application for approval of a cargo 
tank, portable tank or transfer tank shall 
be made to the Marshal on a form fur- 
nished by the Department giving such 
information in full a requested, contain- 
ing the address of the permitted or 
licensed land in accordance with 527 
CMR 14.03 (1) where the vehicle is 
parked overnight or such other informa- 
tion as he may deem necessary. Upon sat- 
isfactory proof of assurance that the tank 

has been designed and mounte 
a c c o r - 

dance with 527 CMR 8.00 the head of 
the Fire Department in the city or town 
where the vehicle is parked overnight 
shall issue a permit to transport com- 
bustible liquids. 

C) Vehicles other than approved tank vehicles 
may transport Class A flammable liquids in 
quantities in excess of 21 gallons or Class B 
flammable liquids in excess of 55 gallons pro- 
vided an application has been made to the 
Marshal on forms furnished by the Depart- 
ment. The Marshal shall issue a permit for a 
period of up to two years for the transporta- 



53 



tion of such flammable fluids provided he is 
satisfied that the owner and the operator of 
the transporting vehicles are familiar with 
these regulations and agree to comply with 
them as provided below: 

1) The vehicle shall be equipped and 
maintained with one or more hand fire 
extinguishers or combined 2A 20BC rat- 
ing fire extinguisher shall be kept in 
good working condition at all times and 
shall be located as directed by the Mar- 
shal. The head of the Fire Department 
or his designee. 

2) Flammable fluid container shall have a 
maximum capacity of 55 gallons and be 
free of corrosion, punctures or other 
defects which would cause them to leak 
or rupture. The containers will be fabri- 
cated of steel, aluminum or other mate- 
rial compatible with the liquid being 
stored therein. Each container will be 
equipped with a tight fitting gasket clo- 
sure to prevent the leaking of the flam- 
mable liquid or gases from such con- 
tainer during storage and transporta- 
tion. 

3) Each container will be legibly marked 
with a waterproof identification describ- 
ing the contents of the vessel. 

4) The Containers of flammable fluids 
shall be securely enclosed or tied down 
so that they will not shift or tip when 
the vehicle makes a sudden stop or 
turn. 

5) No vehicle loaded with flammable flu- 
ids as described in this section shall be 
left unattended for over one hour unless 
the driver notifies the head of the fire 
department where it is parked. The 
head of the Fire Department may 
assume control of the vehicle and its 
contents if the owner is unable or 
unwilling to remove the vehicle or flam- 
mable contents within a reasonable 
time. 

4) FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS IN CONTAINERS 

A) No person shall sell, offer for sale, advertise 
for sale, give, lease, or otherwise transfer 
for consideration or without consideration 
any container intended for the keeping, 
storage, use, handling, transportation, or 
other disposition of gasoline or kerosene 
unless and until such containers shall have 
been approved by the Marshal as safe for 



such purposes. 

5) DEFINITION S 

Approved: Approved by the Marshal. 

Cargo Tank: Any Container having a capac- 
ity of 119 gallons or more intended primar- 
ily for the carriage of combustible liquids, 
including appurtenances, reinforcements, 
fittings, and closures and which: 

(a) is permanently attached to or forms 
a part of a motor vehicle, or is not per- 
manently attached to a motor vehicle 
but which by reason of its size, con- 
struction, or attachment to a motor 
vehicle is loaded or unloaded without 
being removed from the motor vehicle; 
and 

(b) is not fabricated under a DOT speci- 
fication for portable tanks; and 

(c) does not solely supply fuel for the 
propulsion of the transport vehicle upon 
which is is mounted. 

Combustible Liquid: Any liquid having a 
flash point at or above 100 degrees F (38 
degrees C). 

Compartment: A liquid-tight division of a 
cargo tank. 

Department: Department of Public Safety 
or Department of State Police. 

Flammable Liquid: Any liquid having a 
flash point below 100 degrees F (38 degrees 
C) and having a vapor pressure not exceed- 
ing 40 psia at 100 degrees F. 

Marshal: The State Fire Marshal 

Person: Any person, firm or corporation. 

Portable Tank: Any container designed pri- 
marily to be loaded onto, or on, or tem- 
porarily attached to a transport vehicle and 
equipped with skids, mounting, or acces- 
sories to facilitate handling of the tank by 
mechanical means. 

Tank Semi-Trailer: Any vehicle, with or 
without auxiliary motive power, equipped 
with a cargo tank mounted thereon or built 
as an integral part thereof, and used for the 
transportation of combustible liquids, and 
so constructed that, when drawn by a trac- 



54 



tor by means of a fifth wheel connection, 
some part of its load and weight rests upon 
the towing vehicle. 

Tank Truck: Any single self-propelled 
motor vehicle equipped with a cargo tank 
mounted thereon, and used for the trans- 
portation of combustible liquids. 

Tank Vehicle: Any tank truck or tractor and 
tank semi-trailer combination equipped 
with a cargo tank mounted thereon or built 
as an integral part thereof, used for the 
transportation of combustible liquids upon 
the highways. 

Tractor: A self-propelled motor vehicle 
designed and used primarily for drawing 
other vehicles and not so constructed as to 
carry a load other than a part of the weight 
of the vehicle and load so drawn. 

Transfer Tank: Any container having a liq- 
uid capacity of less than 119 gallons into 
which combustible liquids are loaded, and 
drawn out by means of a pump assembly. 

Transport Vehicle: Any vehicle such as an 
automobile, van, truck, tractor or semi- 
trailer, or any combination thereof, pro- 
pelled or drawn by mechanical power and 
used upon the highways in the transporta- 
tion of passengers and property. 

6) VIOLATIONS 

A) Any violations of this section shall be pun- 
ishable by a fine of $100.00 for each 
offense. Each day that any violation contin- 
ues shall constitute a separate offense. 

7) SEVERABILITY 

A) It is hereby declared that the provisions of 
this by-law are severable, and if any provi- 
sions of this by-law shall be declared by a 
valid judgment or decree of any court of 
competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall 
not affect any of the remaining provisions 
of this by-law. 

SECTION 14 FIRE PERMITS 

1) PERMIT FOR OPEN BURNING 

A) A permit must be obtained through the Fire 
Department prior to any open burning. 
Controlled fires for the sole purpose of 
cooking are exempt. 



B) The Permit Holder must follow the guide- 
lines set forth in 310 CMR Department of 
Environmental Protection which includes 
but is not exclusive to the following: 

1) Burning between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 
p.m. only. Please note: Fire must be 
completely extinguished by 4:00 p.m. 

2) Burning must be at least 75 feet from all 
dwellings. 

3) Burning (with a permit) of the following 
is allowed: brush, cane and forestry 
debris from other than commercial or 
industrial land clearing operations. 

4) Burning of the following materials is 
prohibited; brush trees, cane and drift- 
wood from commercial and/or institu- 
tional land clearing operations, grass, 
hay, leaves, stumps and tires. 

5) Stacking, placing or storing combustible 
materials such that a prudent person 
would presume that it will be burned is 
prohibited. 

C) Permit holder must attend the fire until 
completely extinguished and shall have 
available a water supply such as pressurized 
water, pump can or a garden type hose of 
sufficient length to reach the fire area. The 
fire must be completely extinguished before 
leaving it unattended. 

2) VIOLATIONS 

A) Any person who violates this Section will be 
warned by a written notice by the Fire 
Chief or his Representative. A second viola- 
tion within any twelve months period shall 
be punishable by a fine of no more than 
one hundred dollars ($100.00) for each 
offense. Each day that a violation continues 
shall constitute a separate offense. 

3) SEVERABILITY 

A) It is hereby declared that the provisions 
of this by-law are severable, and if any 
provisions of this by-law shall be 
declared unlawful by a valid judgment 
or decree of any court competent juris- 
diction. Such invalidity shall not affect 
any of the remaining provisions of this 
by-law. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 James Good, Chairman 
of the Planning Board moved to withdraw the arti- 
cle. He had received a letter dated October 6th 



55 



from Attorney James Geary who represented Ray- 
mond and Barbara Carye who do not want to pro- 
ceed any further with the proposal. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Commit- 
tee's recommendation on the motion to withdraw. 
The Finance Committee and the Board of Select- 
men both recommended withdrawing the article. 
The Moderator asked for vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Selectman Jeffrey Brem, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Chelms- 
ford Home Rule Charter under Part III, Section 3-2 
(c), Board of Selectmen Appointment Powers, by 
deleting the following: 

"(c) Appointment Powers 

The Board of Selectmen shall appoint a Town 
Manager, a Town Counsel, a town Accountant, 
and a Board of Registrars of Voters (but not 
including the Town Clerk). The Board of Select- 
men shall also appoint such other multiple 
member bodies as may be provided by by-law. " 

and add the following as Part III, Section 3-2 (c): 

The Board of Selectmen shall appoint a town 
Manager, a Town Counsel, a Town Accountant, 
and a Board of Registrars of Voters (but not includ- 
ing the Town Clerk). The Board of Selectmen shall 
also appoint such policy advisory committees as 
they deem necessary, licensing committees, and 
such other multiple member bodies as may be pro- 
vided by by-law. " 

Selectman Roger Blomgren said that this article 
had appeared on the Spring Warrant. He gave a 
presentation and which showed the different policy 
committees that have been formed. He explained 
the purpose of the article. He felt that if the Board 
of Selectmen wanted to have a committee formed 
they had to request the Town Manager to do so. 
He felt that the Board of Selectmen should be able 
to appoint the committee, and that the Committee 
would answer to the Board and not the Manager. 
Numerous questions were asked from the Repre- 
sentatives. Concerns were expressed about the 
wording. The Finance Committee was against the 
article. They feel that the Town manager handles 
the everyday operations of the Town. The Board of 
Selectmen are a part-time Board. The Manager has 
the time to investigate qualified people for commit- 
tees where the Board has a history of appointing 
people for political reasons, who may not necessar- 
ily be qualified to be on a committee. The Board of 
Selectmen had previously recommended to the arti- 
cle, by a 3-2 vote. Selectman Blomgren then moved 
to amend the article by putting a period in the sec- 
ond sentence after the word necessary, and delete 
all the wording appearing after. The Moderator 



asked the Finance Committee's recommendation 
on the motion to amend, the Finance Committee 
was in favor. The Board of Selectmen were in favor 
of the motion to amend. He then asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands on the motion to 
amend. Motion carried. The discussion continued. 
Selectman DeFreitas spoke against the article. 
Selectman Brem spoke in favor of the article. Barry 
Balan spoke against the article. Harry Foster spoke 
in favor. Leonard Doolan moved the question to 
stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to stop debate. Motion car- 
ried. He then asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands on the article as amended, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Jeffrey Brem 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General 
By-Laws Article VI Police Regulations by adding 
Section 23, Sale of Non-Alcoholic Beverages as fol- 
lows: 

"Section 23 SALE OF NON-ALCOHOLIC BEV- 
ERAGES 

It shall be unlawful for any person, business, 
corporation, or partnership to sell or cause to 
be sold, to any person under the age of 21, 
non-alcoholic beer, or any malt beverage with 
any alcoholic content, however much reduced. 

Whoever violates any provision of this ordi- 
nance shall be fined two hundred ($200.00) dol- 
lars per offense. " 

Selectman Brem spoke about the article. The 
Board had been approached to look at changing 
the law by putting a restriction on the licensing of 
a certain beverage. After looking into the matter, 
all the Board could in fact do was to propose a by- 
law, and let the Town Meeting Representative 
decide the issue. 

Dennis Ready, speaking on behalf of the propo- 
nent of the article, moved to amend the article by 
inserting the following wording as Paragraph 2: 

"Such non-alcoholic beer, non-alcoholic wine or 
such malt beverages shall be sold only by estab- 
lishments licensed by the Town pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 138." 

John Harrington came forward and explained 
the purpose of the article. Surrounding area cities 
and towns have passed this proposed law. This 
would protect anyone under the age of 21 from 
purchasing a product that looks like beer and tastes 
like beer. This is because it does not fall under the 
jurisdiction of the ABC Board. He answered a 
question concerning the amount of alcohol present 
in the non-alcoholic products. Attorney Joseph 
Shanahan, representing E.J. Rear don Co. a whole- 



56 



sale distributor, wanted to know why correspon- 
dence that he had dated September 8th referred 
that non-Alcoholic beer does not fall under the def- 
inition of chapter 138, does not apply under the 
Alcoholic Beverage Control boards jurisdiction, 
how can the amendment to the article stand? 
James Harrington, Town Counsel, said that this 
correspondence was concerning the authority of 
chapter 138 had with the ABCC. The amendment 
only applies to the sale of the beverage in package 
stores. James Harrington explained that his opinion 
of the original article would be a legal article, how- 
ever in regards to the amendment being attached 
the by-law could be jeopardized, the Attorney Gen- 
eral may not approve it. Some other town's have 
submitted this wording but as of yet no approval or 
disapproval has been made. Questions were asked 
on where these non-alcoholic beverages could be 
purchased. John Harrington explained that any 
establishment or store is eligible to sell any non- 
alcoholic product, and that there is no age limit of 
the buyer. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Committee had 
no recommendation at this time. The Board of 
Selectmen do not support the amendment. They 
had in fact supported the original article. Attorney 
Joseph Shanahan again mentioned that he was rep- 
resenting a local distributor, E.J. Reardon Co. 
spoke against the article. John Harrington owned a 
liquor store here in Town, where exactly were his 
interests in the actual sale of the product? He said 
that these products have been on the market and 
available for a long time. He doesn't believe that 
there is that many sales to minors of this product. 
He cited the many other products that are non- 
alcoholic beer products that contain much more 
alcohol such as cough syrups for example are read- 
ily available. There are many products that are 
marketed to be used as a substitute. Other con- 
cerns should be made toward controlling the sale 
of cigarettes, or machine guns. There are age limits 
on the sale of these items, which are far more dan- 
gerous to the person and the public. A lengthy dis- 
cussion followed. 

William Keohane spoke about the intent of the 
article. Was it in fact the intent of this article to 
keep the sale in the liquor stores because of the 
growing market and interest of non-alcoholic bev- 
erages being consumed by people of legal age. Beer 
companies want to control the whole market, the 
drinkers and the non-drinkers. That is why this 
product has been developed by them. If that is the 
case, then Liquor stores shouldn't be able to sell 
chips or other items that aren't related to their 
actual licenses. He can't see why a teenager would 
want to spend the amount of money required to 
purchase a product that looks and tastes like beer, 
if they want the real thing they find a way to make 
it available to them for the price they pay. That is 
what should be looked into is the issue of teenagers 



consuming real alcohol and the abuse that goes on 
because there isn't more control. A number of Rep- 
resentatives spoke in favor of passage of the article. 
Raymond McKeon spoke in favor of the article. 
Concerns were expressed about the use by the chil- 
dren of the community. Susan Gates spoke about 
defeating the amendment and pass the original 
article. Selectman Blomgren asked if the amend- 
ment could cause the Attorney General to not 
approve the article. Town Counsel replied yes there 
was a possibility that it may not be approved, that 
is why he would not approve it. Should the original 
article pass and be approved by the Attorney Gen- 
era"! then at a later town Meeting an article could 
be submitted amending the by-law to reflect the 
current amendment. The Moderator asked for a 
hand vote on the motion to amend the article. 
Motion defeated. More discussion took place. A 
number of Representatives spoke in favor of the 
article. Allen Thomas spoke about the article. The 
issue is not the fact that children are drinking beer. 
The suppliers of the product should be held 
responsible for selling to minors. Cut off the supply 
and deal with the children through recreation, the 
article is a white wash. Dennis Ready made a 
motion to move the question to stop debate. 
Motion carried, unanimously by a vote of a show 
of hands. The Moderator then attempted a hand 
count which failed. The tellers came forward and a 
hand count was conducted. Yes 48 No 56, motion 
defeated. 

The Moderator announced that Dr. Richard 
Moser, Superintendent of Schools wanted to 
address the Representatives at the conclusion of the 
meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Thomas Moran moved that 
the Town vote to transfer and appropriate the 
amount of $120,000.00 from line item 16, snow 
and ice for the purpose of reopening the West Fire 
Station effective December 1, 1992. 

Thomas Moran spoke about the article. The 
actual amount needed would be $150,000. but he 
felt that the other $30,000. could be found within 
the budget. There was $119,000.00 left in the snow 
and ice account last year. There is a need now for 
reopening the station, according to the past records 
available. In 1989 there were 668 emergencies, 
sixty-four of them were medical emergencies. The 
Fire Department is the first to respond to these, 
not an ambulance. The station was built in 1970 
because there was a need. He felt that in all fair- 
ness the Fire stations all over the Town should be 
on a rotating basis, so that all areas of Town 
receive the same type of coverage and protection. 
Bernard Lynch, Town Manager, said that he was 
investigating for the future possibility of reopening 
the station now that the fire contract is more man- 
ageable. However, using the monies in the snow 



57 



and ice account is not the answer at this time. 

The Finance Committee was not in favor of 
using the money from the snow and ice account. 
This money is raised each year for the purpose of 
maintaining the entire Town. The amount is based 
on the dollar amount voted the previous year. The 
majority of the Board of Selectmen were against 
the article. A number of Representatives spoke in 
favor of the article. James Sousa said the the Town 
should get the most service for the money spent. 
He felt that this would buy a lot of service for a 
much needed situation. The Moderator asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands on the article. 
Motion defeated. A hand count was requested. The 
tellers came forward and conducted a hand count. 
The result was Yes 43 No 54, the motion was 
defeated. 

The Moderator closed the meeting seeing that 
there were no further articles. 

Dr. Richard Moser came forward and invited 
the Representatives to attend a meeting scheduled 
for Tuesday, November 17th, with the AIDS Task 
Force. The Committee was scheduled to make cer- 
tain recommendations concerning AIDS awareness 
and education. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:30 p.m. 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 

STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 3, 1992 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are 
hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to 
vote at: 



Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 9: Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday the third of November, 1992 from 
7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

1) To cast their votes in the State Election for the 
candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

ELECTORS OF THE PRESIDENT 

AND VICE PRESIDENT for the Commonwealth 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT... fifth Mdlsx. Senatorial District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 

COURT 16th Mdlsx. Representative District 

COUNTY SHERIFF Middlesex County 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Middlesex County 

2) To vote on the following questions: 

#1. Tax on Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco 

#2. Public Reporting of Corporate Tax Informa- 
tion 

#3. Requiring Reduced, Reusable or Recyclable 
Packaging 

#4. Tax on Oils and Hazardous Materials 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon at the time and place of 
said election. 

Given under our hands this 14th day of October, 
A.D. 1992. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

William R. Logan, Chairman 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Vice Chairman 

Peter V. Lawlor, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren 

Jeffrey A. Brem 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 



Town Office Building Gymnasium 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

Byam School Cafeteria 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 



58 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 3, 1992 



amended Nov. 13, 1992 Fed. Law counted 9 out of the country ballots. 4 were only allowed to vote for Pres. & Rep. in Congress 



Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Pet. 4 Pet. 5 Pet. 6 Pet. 7 Pet. 8 Pet. 9 Total 
PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT 

Blanks 16 15 14 11 8 15 17 8 12 116 

Bush/Quayle 580 727 622 619 784 692 801 611 715 6151 

Clinton/Gore 732 913 704 720 841 703 746 793 680 6832 

Fulani/Munoz 12 1110 118 

Hagelin/Tompkins 1110 3 

LaRouche/Bevel 0010000001 

Marrou/Lord 7 11 5 7 9 8 9 11 6 73 

Perot/Stockdale 512 632 518 546 684 560 613 527 583 5175 

Phillips/Knight 110 10 10 2 6 

Brisben/Garson 0000000000 

Dodge/Ormsby 0000000000 

Write-in 685385933 50 

Misc. 0000021003 



TOTAL 


1856 


2310 


1871 


1908 


2335 


1986 


2196 


1956 


2000 


18418 


REP. IN CONGRESS 5TH DISTRICT 






















Blanks 


79 


157 


130 


99 


158 


105 


125 


102 


129 


1084 


Paul M. Cronin 


596 


675 


654 


553 


796 


656 


871 


608 


751 


6160 


Martin T. Meehan 


1023 


1294 


961 


1123 


1193 


1105 


1061 


1107 


965 


9832 


David E. Coleman 


31 


34 


40 


30 


44 


25 


20 


47 


41 


312 


Mary J. Farinelli 


121 


143 


85 


98 


136 


91 


117 


86 


111 


988 


Write-In 


6 


5 


1 


3 


8 


2 





5 


3 


33 


Misc 





2 





2 





2 


2 


1 





9 


TOTAL 


1856 


2310 


1871 


1908 


2335 


1986 


2196 


1956 


2000 


18418 


COUNCILLOR 3RD DISTRICT 






















Blanks 


219 


351 


283 


244 


358 


252 


311 


248 


296 


2562 


Robert B. Kennedy 


929 


1185 


871 


1033 


1048 


952 


976 


1009 


843 


8846 


Vincent P. McLaughlin 


706 


773 


714 


628 


926 


778 


901 


691 


857 


6974 


Write-In 


2 





2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


7 





16 


Misc 





1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


5 





4 


16 



TOTAL 



1856 



2310 1871 1908 2335 1984 2195 1955 



2000 18414 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 5TH 

Blanks 508 

Lucille "Cile" P. Hicks 1318 

Write-In 19 

Misc 11 

TOTAL 1856 2310 



782 


558 


611 


662 


556 


586 


600 


573 


5436 


1511 


1304 


1287 


1655 


1413 


1586 


1332 


1415 


12821 


12 


7 


6 


11 


5 


16 


23 


12 


111 


5 


2 


4 


7 


10 


7 








46 



1871 



1908 2335 1984 2195 1955 2000 18414 



REP. IN GENERAL COURT 16TH MDLSX 

Blanks 440 

Carol C. Cleven 1393 

Write-In 13 

Misc 10 

TOTAL 



660 


443 


498 


557 


461 


496 


474 


463 


4492 


632 


1414 


1393 


1763 


1510 


1681 


1464 


1528 


13778 


11 


11 


10 


10 


6 


11 


17 


8 


97 


7 


3 


7 


5 


7 


7 





1 


47 



1856 2310 1871 1908 2335 



1984 



2195 1955 2000 18414 



Pet. 1 


Pet. 2 


Pet. 3 


Pet. 4 


Pet. 5 


Pet. 6 


Pet. 7 


Pet. 8 


Pet. 9 


Total 


240 


382 


298 


244 


382 


283 


310 


275 


272 


2686 


974 


1173 


924 


1098 


1121 


982 


1017 


1018 


990 


9297 


638 


751 


348 


560 


828 


717 


865 


656 


731 


6394 


4 


2 


1 


2 


1 





1 


6 


5 


22 





2 





4 


3 


2 


2 





2 


15 



49 


53 


46 


59 


43 


60 


53 


45 


41 


449 


968 


1228 


1111 


942 


1297 


1091 


1300 


1093 


1125 


10155 


839 


1029 


714 


907 


995 


833 


842 


817 


834 


7810 



156 


209 


163 


158 


178 


184 


216 


200 


178 


1642 


853 


1039 


956 


896 


1169 


929 


1069 


967 


963 


8841 


847 


1062 


752 


854 


988 


871 


910 


788 


859 


7931 



59 



SHERIFF MDLSX. CTY. 

Blanks 

John P. McGonigle 

Michael J. Dever 

Write-In 

Misc 

TOTAL 1856 2310 1871 1908 2335 1984 2195 1955 2000 18414 

QUESTION 1 

Blanks 

YES 

NO 

TOTAL 1856 2310 1871 1908 2335 1984 2195 1955 2000 18414 

QUESTION 2 

Blanks 

YES 

NO 

TOTAL 1856 2310 1871 1908 2335 1986 2196 1956 2000 18418 

QUESTION 3 

Blanks 

YES 

NO 

TOTAL 1856 2310 1871 1908 2335 1984 2195 1955 2000 18414 

QUESTION 4 

Blanks 

YES 

NO 

TOTAL 1856 2310 1871 1908 2335 1984 2195 1955 2000 18414 

COUNTY COMM. (2) 

Blanks 

Edward J. Kennedy 

Thomas J. Larkin 

James P. Regan 

Edward J. Weinberg 

Richard S. Mahoney 

Write-In 

Misc 

TOTAL 3712 4620 3742 3816 4670 3968 4390 4000 36828 



54 


66 


52 


73 


51 


79 


60 


60 


45 


540 


681 


870 


785 


694 


931 


767 


935 


779 


832 


7274 


1121 


1374 


1034 


1141 


1353 


1138 


1200 


1116 


1123 


10600 



137 


125 


94 


146 


121 


130 


114 


123 


86 


1076 


640 


848 


750 


663 


897 


712 


854 


760 


784 


6908 


1079 


1137 


1027 


1099 


1317 


1142 


1227 


1072 


1130 


10430 



1160 


1575 


1207 


1268 


1605 


1310 


1407 


1189 


1256 


11977 


872 


1130 


846 


1019 


1017 


943 


939 


1014 


824 


8604 


688 


769 


616 


686 


773 


644 


683 


691 


671 


6221 


490 


538 


538 


407 


620 


542 


671 


493 


618 


4917 


343 


419 


396 


291 


489 


393 


532 


358 


476 


3697 


151 


183 


137 


140 


160 


132 


154 


156 


155 


1368 


8 


5 


2 


3 


2 


4 


2 


9 





35 





1 





2 


4 





2 








9 



60 





TOWN MEETING 




REPRESENTATIVES 




PRECINCT 1 


TERM 


NAME 


1995 


John G. Coppinger 


1995 


Marian D. Currier 


1995 


Philip Currier 


1995 


Scott J. McCaig 


1995 


Paul F. McCarthy 


1995 


Carl W. Seidel 


1994 


Joel M. Karp 


1994 


Richard P. McClure 


1994 


Martha McClure 


1994 


William E. Spence 


1994 


Robert M. Schneider 


1994 


Jean B. Rook 




David A. MacDonald "repl 12-17 


1993 


Fotine Alexis McCarthy* * 


1993 


Helen A. Manahan 


1993 


Susan G. Koeckhoven 


1993 


Sandra A. Kilburn 


1993 


Barry B, Balan 


1993 


Barry P. Joyce 


rem = removed; repl= replaced 




PRECINCT 2 


TERM 


NAME 


1995 


George F. Abely 


1995 


Barry T. Bell 


1995 


Bonnie I. Foster 


1995 


Jesse C. Foster 


1995 


Loretta A. Gelenian 


1995 


Douglas L. Wright 




Milton H. Kinney "*repl 12-17 


1995 


Wanda L. Dunn*** 


1994 


Albert Leman 


1994 


Jeffrey W. Stallard 




Karen S. Vandenbulcke "res 9-2 


1994 


Kathryn M. Fisher* * 


1994 


Marc A. Vandenbulcke 


1994 


Mary Jo Welch 


1993 


Harry A. Foster 


1993 


Harold I. Matzkin 


1993 


George L. Merrill 


1993 


Francis G. Miskell 


1993 


Susan M. Olsen 


1993 


Robert J. Scharn 


rem = removed; repl= replaced; res = resigned 




PRECINCT 3 


TERM 


NAME 


1995 


Michael F. Curran 


1995 


John P. Emerson, Jr. 


1995 


Christine A. Gleason 



1995 


Katherine C. Harbison 


1995 


Judith Hass 


1995 


Jonathan C. Stubbs 




Pamela S. Am way * *res 8-4 


1994 


William F. Tucker* * 


1994 


Robert D. Marazzi 


1994 


Francis J. Miethe 


1994 


Thomas E. Moran 


1994 


Michael F. McCall 


1994 


Thomas J. Welch 


1993 


Kathleen S. Fitzpatrick 


1993 


D. Lorraine Lambert 


1993 


Carole A. Marcotte 


1993 


Brenda A. McDermott 


1993 


Jane S. McKersie 




Priscilla A. Rega "res. 7-30 


1993 


Peter Dulchinos" 


res = resigned 






PRECINCT 4 


TERM 


NAME 


1995 


Linda J. Allen 


1995 


Jeffrey A. Brem 


1995 


Robert L. Hughes 


1995 


Lynn M. Marcella 


1995 


Arthur J. Moores 




Frances T. McDougall "rem 12-17 




Donald P. Ayer "res 10-19 


1994 


Steven B. Hadley 


1994 


Beverly A. Koltookian 


1994 


Michael R. Parquette 


1994 


Kay E. Roberts 


1994 


Daniel J. Sullivan III 


1993 


Arthur W. Blomgren 


1993 


John T. Conrad, Jr. 


1993 


Ruth K. Delaney 




Thomas E. Firth, Jr. "rem 12-17 


1993 


Gerald W. Pacht 


1993 


Ralph M. Nebalski 


rem = removed; repl = replaced ; res = resigned 




PRECINCT 5 


TERM 


NAME 


1995 


Karen I. Braunschweiger 


1995 


Dean Carmeris 


1995 


Stephen J. Mallette 


1995 


Evelyn S. Thoren 


1995 


Glenn R. Thoren 


1995 


Ronald W. Wetmore 


1994 


Robert E. Brooks 


1994 


Catherine Brown 


1994 


Jonathan A. Stevens 


1994 


Steven J. Temple 


1994 


W. Allen Thomas Jr. 


1994 


Patricia Wojtas 


1993 


James M. Creegan 



61 



1993 Kathleen F. Hillman 

Arnold J. Lovering "rem 12-17 



1993 


Wendy C. Marcks 


1993 


David P. McLaughlin 


1993 


Barbara H. Ward 


rem = removed; repl = replaced 




PRECINCT 6 


TERM 


NAME 




Carol Lynn Bacon "rem 12-17 


1995 


Roger A. Blomgren 


1995 


Martin A. Gruber 


1995 


Edward S. Marshall 


1995 


David J. McLachlan 


1995 


Cheryl M. Warshafsky 


1994 


Earl C. Burt 




Patrick}. Calnan "rem 12-17 


1994 


David W. Foner 


1994 


Mary E. Frantz 


1994 


Howard J. Hall 


1994 


James A. Sousa 


1993 


John W. Carson 


1993 


Janet G. Dubner 


1993 


Bradford O. Emerson 


1993 


Margaret A. Johnson 


1993 


M. Elizabeth Marshall 


1993 


Raymond P. McKeon 


rem = removed; repl = replaced 



PRECINCT 7 

TERM NAME 

Kathryn Brough '"rem 12-17 

1995 Leonard W. Doolan III 

1995 Dwight M. Hayward 

1995 Beyla V. Makovsky 

1995 Andrew W. Silinsh 

1995 * 'Reps filled vacancy position 

1994 Jocelyn G.T. Anthony 

1994 Paul F. Gleason 

1994 Thomas E. Mills 

1994 Linda G. Morabito 

1994 Carol A. Stark 

1994 Frederick W. Wikander 
1993 Susan J. Gates 

1993 Joan M. Gauthier 

1993 Mark W. Gauthier 

1993 Edward H. Hilliard 

1993 Bernard A. Ready 

1993 Dennis J. Ready 

1993 Michael P. Anthony" 

rem = removed ; repl = replaced 

PRECINCT 8 

TERM NAME 

Daniel W. Burke "repl 12-17 

1995 Shawn M. Kraft" 



1995 


Francis M. Conlin 


1995 


Adrienne M. Jerome 


1995 


Diane Lewis 


1995 


Christopher J. Luppi 


1995 


Stanley W. Norkunas 


1994 


Evelyn P. Bell 


1994 


Alexander w. Gervais 


1994 


Bruce J. Harper, Sr. 


1994 


Christopher T. Garrahan 


1994 


Peter G. Johnson 


1994 


Samuel Poulten 


1993 


Walter A. Cleven 


1993 


William F. Dalton 


1993 


Richard J. Day 


1993 


William P. Keohane 


1993 


Doris J. Mahoney 


1993 


Stuart G. Weisfeldt 


rem = removed; repl = replaced 




PRECINCT 9 


TERM 


NAME 


1995 


Donald L. Elias 


1995 


Henry T. Emmet 


1995 


James P. Good 


1995 


Alan L. Moyer 


1995 


Charles A. Piper 


1995 


Barbara J. Scavezze 


1994 


Edward A. Cady 


1994 


Phyllis Elias 


1994 


Joseph M. Erbacher 


1994 


Allan T. Galpin, Jr. 


1994 


Cynthia J. Kaplan 


1994 


Frank R. Peterson 




Eleanor D. Abbott "repl 12-17 


1993 


C. Thomas Christiano" 


1993 


John S. Fudge, Jr. 




Roland E. Linstad "*rem 12-17 


1993 


Elizabeth A. McCarthy 


1993 


Alan R. Pajak 


1993 


Doris A. Tereshko 


rem = removed; repl = replaced 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

CEMETERY COMMISSION (3 Yr. Term) Exp. 

Everett V. Olssen 1994 

Gerald L. Hardy 1995 

Charlotte P. DeWolf, Chmn 1993 

Frank Peterson, Superintendent 

CONSTABLE (3 Yr. Term) 

William E. Spence 1995 



62 



BOARD OF HEALTH (3 Yr. Term) 

PaulE. McCarthy, Clerk 1994 

Paul J. Canniff, Chmn 1995 

Mark W. Gauthier, Vice Chmn 1993 

Dr. Michael Dean (Appt.) 1992 

Richard J. Day (Dir.) 
Judy Dunigan (Nurse) 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (5 Yr. Term) 

William P. Keohane 1996 

Lynn M. Marcella 1997 

Robert L. Hughes 1993 

RuthK. Delaney, Chmn 1995 

Pamela Turnbull (Governor Appointed) 7/1993 

Lisa Royce (Director) 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES (3 Yr. Term) 

Susan Koeckhoven 1995 

Sarah L. Warner 1995 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy 1993 

D. Lorraine Lambert 1993 

Lynda Reid Warren 1993 

Kay Roberts 1994 

Nancy Knight 1994 

Mary E. Mahoney, Director 

MODERATOR (3 Yr. Term Exp. 1993) 

Dennis E. McHugh 

PLANNING BOARD (3 Yr. Term) 

James M. Creegan 1995 

Kim J. MacKenzie, Chmn 1994 

James P. Good 1994 

John F. McCarthy 1995 

Christine A. Gleason, Vice Chmn 1994 

Eugene E. Gilet, Clerk 1993 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr 1993 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (3 Yr. Term) 

Barbara H. Ward, Vice Chmn 1994 

Carl A. Olsson 1995 

Wendy Marcks, Sec 1995 

Judith B. Mallette 1993 

MaryE. Frantz, Chmn 1993 

Dr. Richard H. Moser, Superintendent 

SELECTMEN (3 Yr. Term) 

Jeffrey A. Brem 1995 

Peter V. Lawlor, Clerk 1995 

Roger A. Blomgren 1993 

William R. Logan, Chmn 1994 

Richard E. DeFreitas, Vice Chmn 1994 

SEWER COMMISSION (3 Yr. Term) 

John P. Emerson, Jr. , Chmn 1995 

Robert P. Joyce, Clerk 1993 



Richard J. Day, Vice Chmn 1993 

George Abely 1994 

Barry B. Balan 1995 

James Casparro, Sewer Superintendent 

TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Manager 

Bernard F. Lynch 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 

Finance Director 

Charles F. Mansfield 

Town Accountant 

Bernard Meyler 

Board of Assessors 

Diane M. Phillips 

Building Inspector 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 

DPW Director 

James E. Pearson 

Fire Chief 

Robert L. Hughes 

Police Chief 

Raymond P. McKeon 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



Commissioners 

Charlotte P. DeWolf, chairman 
Everett V. Olsen 
Gerald L. Hardy 



Term 
Expires 

1993 
1994 
1995 



Highlights of FY 1992 operations were as follows: 

• Considerable tree damage resulting from Hurri- 
cane "Bob" occurred in Forefathers Cemetery. 
This required the removal of seven locust and 
two maple trees. In addition, irreparable dam- 
age occurred to some slate monuments in the 
historical section and a large granite monument 
in the new section was overturned by a falling 
tree. 

• There were three incidents of vandalism in the 



63 



cemeteries. 

• Industrial accidents in this period included an 
eye injury, a severed fingertip and a back 
injury. 

• Work on completion of the new development in 
Pine Ridge was delayed due to a lack of afford- 
able loam supply. 

• Work loads due to the unusually large number 
of interments made it necessary to use contract 
grass cutting in three of the Town Cemeteries 
during this period. 

Goals for 1993 include the following: 

• Eliminate the occurrence of industrial accidents 
by use of safety appliances and improved work 
methods and procedures. 

• Attempt to reduce vandalism by participation in 
cooperative education programs such as High 
School Government Day. 

• Provide full and satisfactory cemetery operation 
by the addition of one employee while eliminat- 
ing contract grass cutting and contract installa- 
tion of monument foundations. These steps will 
offset the cost of the additional employee. 

The Commission takes this opportunity to con- 
gratulate the staff for their outstanding efforts during 
1992. 

The full time staff includes: 

Frank Peterson, Superintendent 
Jorge Caires, Working Foreman 
Kenneth Frazier, Backhoe Operator 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank P. Peterson 

Secretary to the Commission 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health Members 

Chairman Mark W. Gauthier 

Vice Chairman Paul F. McCarthy 

Clerk Paul J. Canniff 

Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health Richard J. Day 

Asst. Director/Health Inspector John P. Emerson 

Departmental Assistant Diana L. Wright 



Town Nurse 
Town Physician 



Judith Dunigan, R.N. 
Eric P. Kaplan, M.D. 



Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1992 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement 
Program continued its effort to clean up our water- 
ways. The Board of Health, with the advent of a cen- 
tral sewer system in the Town of Chelmsford, is now 
embarking on certain enforcement activities to ensure 
compliance with local bylaws which will ensure a safe 
water supply. Dye testing, water sampling and 
issuance of septic system permits will continue in all 
the non-sewered areas. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed 
below: 

Percolation Tests - 53 

Deep Tests - 118 

Sewage Repair Permits - 48 

Sewage Construction Permits - 67 

Miscellaneous License & Fees 



$2,650 
5,900 
1,200 
3,350 

18,059 

$31,159 



During 1992 four inspections were made at exist- 
ing day care centers; one-hundred ninety-eight inspec- 
tions were made for Chapter II Housing; eight school 
inspections; Five-hundred ten complaints received 
and checked; Camp Paul inspections; thirty bathing 
beaches inspections; three International Certificates of 
Vaccination, restaurant and retail food store inspec- 
tions, one-hundred twenty-six establishments in town 
inspected twice a year. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was 
reappointed by the Board of Selectmen as the town's 
Hazardous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordi- 
nator to enforce the "Right-to-Know" law for this 
town. 

During our Annual Household Hazardous Waste 
Collection Day, held on May 9, 1992, we properly 
disposed of the following quantities of materials: 

1. 19 barrels of Hazardous Materials 

2. 1,025+ Gallons of Automotive Waste Oil 

3. 190 Car Batteries 

New Regulations for the Protection of the Public 
Health 

1992 was another productive year for the Board of 
Health. During this time frame the Board of Health 
implemented, initiated or upgraded regulations to 
control the area "Governing The Practice of Mas- 
sage/Muscular Therapy. " 



64 



Communicable Disease Program 

Reports of the following diseases were completed 
during 1992 for the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health: 



Tuberculosis 
Lyme Disease 
Hepatitis A 
Hepatitis B 
Salmonella 

Campylobacter Enteritis 
Giardiasis 



1 
1 
2 
6 
10 
17 
6 
25 



Tuberculosis Control Program* 

Referrals received from the Lowell Chest Clinic and Middlesex Com- 
munity Hospital TB Clinic. 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis 
and those persons whose employment require certifi- 
cation of freedom from that disease is another respon- 
sibility of the Town Nurse. One-hundred eighty-seven 
Mantoux (TB) tests were given to town residents for 
pre-employment and to household contacts of active 
cases in compliance with the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Health regulations. Home visits and 
telephone calls are made to families of active and 
some inactive tuberculosis cases on a periodic basis to 
ensure understanding of the illness and that adequate 
medical follow-up is achieved. Numerous medical 
records are kept and updated on residents who have a 
positive (TB) Mantoux test and are receiving medica- 
tion prophylactically and being followed radiologically 
at the Lowell Chest Program and Middlesex TB 
Clinic. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health and Council on Aging spon- 
sored two flu clinics this year. One-hundred fourteen 
persons were immunized with pneumonia vaccine and 
one-thousand two-hundred ninety-eight persons were 
immunized with flu vaccine at clinics. Additional 
doses were given to nursing homes, school nurses for 
staff, ten home visits were made to handicapped or 
house-bound residents and forty-two doses to McFar- 
lin Manor and Chelmsford Arms residents. A total of 
one-thousand seven-hundred seven doses of flu vac- 
cine were administered in town. 

One-hundred forty immunizations were adminis- 
tered to adults and students in compliance with the 
Massachusetts Immunizations Laws and prophlacti- 
cally to residents traveling to underdeveloped coun- 
tries. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held 
the first Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 



at the Board of Health, Town Offices. Four-hundred 
sixteen residents attended the screenings. 

Cholesterol Screening Program 

Cholesterol screenings were offered to residents 
several times during the year. A nominal fee was 
charged and the dates were announced in the news- 
papers several weeks prior to the screening. Seventy- 
five residents were screened for cholesterol. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Health Department offers lead paint testing 
for children between the ages nine months and six 
years. Residents may call the Health Department at 
250-5243 and make an appointment with the nurse. 
Sixty children were screened for lead paint. 

Other screenings offered by the Health Depart- 
ment include Diabetes and Mammography. Dates of 
these programs will be advertised in advance. 

A Health Fair will be held in conjunction with 
Westford every other year, finances permitting. This 
year's Health Fair is in Westford, April 3, 1993. 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of 
Commissioners worked diligently over the past year 
to complete the design for the new mentally retarded 
home to be located on Groton Road in North 
Chelmsford. The Authority received approval in 1987 
to do this development along with Delaney Terrace 
and its scattered family developments, however, fund- 
ing had been withheld until recently. MGIA Archi- 
tects, Inc., from Boston was selected to design the 
one story, 8 bedroom duplex. Construction is antici- 
pated to begin in the Spring of 1993. 

The Authority is in the process of completing a 
modernization project at Chelmsford Arms. The 
Authority is upgrading the fire alarm system with the 
assistance of the Fire Department. The Architect is 
ASI Engineers of Burlington, MA, and the Contractor 
is Crowe Electric and Sons, Inc. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs as 
of June 30, 1992 provide a total of 353 units of low 
income housing, 198 elderly, 14 handicapped and 141 
family. Four of these programs are funded by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts through the Execu- 
tive Office of Communities and Development under 
Chapter 667, Chapter 705, Chapter 689 and the new 
MRVP. Chelmsford Arms, completed in 1974 has 56 
regular units and 8 handicapped units. The Commu- 
nity Residence for the mildly to moderately retarded 



65 



was purchased in 1974 and has 6 units. Six, 2 bed- 
room condominiums in Pickwick Estates were pur- 
chased in 1981. McFarlin Manor, completed in 1981, 
has 43 regular units, 3 handicapped units and one, 4 
bedroom congregate unit which serves the semi-inde- 
pendent elderly. Delaney Terrace, finished in 1990, 
has 48 units, 3 of which are handicapped and a one, 4 
bedroom congregate unit for the frail elderly. These 
developments are funded under the Chapter 667. The 
State eliminated the Chapter 707 Program and 
replaced it with the Massachusetts Rental Voucher 
Program. Regulations on eligibility changed and appli- 
cants were allowed to go mobile to other communities 
on the program. The Authority, due to these program 
changes, went from 26 units down to 15. Under the 
705 Family Program, 11 units are scattered around 
Chelmsford. The Ch. 689 development is currently 
under construction. 

The Section 8 Programs are funded by the Federal 
Government through the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development. The Section 8 Existing Housing 
Program presently has 58 certificates under lease in 
the private market throughout Chelmsford and other 
communities and 84 vouchers under the Section 8 
Voucher Program. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority fiscal year 
ending of June 30, 1992 lists assets at $3,923,000., lia- 
bilities at $3,923,000., for all programs. All develop- 
ments are inspected annually by maintenance and 
administrative staff. The Authority is especially grate- 
ful to those organizations which express special con- 
cern for the Chelmsford Housing Authority residents 
and to the Chelmsford Garden Club for their assis- 
tance in the beautification of the developments every 
year. 

Members of the staff include Lisa Royce, Execu- 
tive Director; Helen Cantara, Administrative Assis- 
tant; Linda Dalton, Leased Housing Coordinator; 
Richard O'Neil, Part-Time Maintenance Laborer; Ed 
Tierney, Full-Time Grounds Keeper and Manuel Men- 
donca, Full-Time Grounds Keeper. 

Regular meetings are held at McFarlin Manor, 10 
Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m., on the first Tuesday each 
month. The Annual Meeting is first Tuesday in May. 
All meetings are open to the public. The Chelmsford 
Housing Authority Board of Commissioners would 
like to thank the residents of Chelmsford and Town 
Officials for their continued support and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman 

Robert L. Hughes, Vice Chairman 

William P. Keohane, Treasurer 

Lynn M. Marcella, Asst. Treasurer 

Pamela A. Turnbull, Appointee 



66 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 




BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Front row (seated) left to right: D. Lorraine Lambert, Vice-Chair; Elizabeth McCarthy, Chair; 
Susan Koeckhoven. Back row (standing): Nancy Knight, Treasurer; Kay Roberts, Secretary; Sarah 
Warner and Lynda Warren 



Adams Library, 25 Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 

Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 



Library Trustees: 



Elizabeth McCarthy, Chair 

D. Lorraine Lambert, Vice-Chair 

Nancy Knight, Treasurer 

Kay Roberts, Secretary 

Susan Koeckhoven 

Lynda Warren 

Sarah Warner 



Services and Circulation 

1992 circulation increased overall by 6%. Refer- 
ence use increased by 29% over the previous year. 
This increase in use was evident during peak times 
when patrons were frequently unable to find a park- 
ing space (or a seat). In addition, there were long 
waiting lists for popular items. 

For the first time in 2 years the library fully quali- 
fied for State certification by meeting all the State's 
minimum standards and regulations - including the 
municipal appropriation. State Certification makes the 
library eligible for State Aid and grants. It also allows 
Chelmsford residents to use other certified libraries in 
the State without charge. 



An upgrade of the library's computer system 
began in December. New software will make the on- 
line catalogs easier to use and circulation procedures 
will be simplified. It is anticipated that this upgrade 
will be completed in early 1993. 

The Library renewed its commitment to home- 
bound residents by instituting a program of service 
for residents who cannot access the library facilities. 

In January the Library conducted a User Survey 
as part of a program of evaluating current services. 
Library users gave staff the highest rating; the library 
facilities the lowest. Concerns were expressed about 
the library's non-print collections but overall 85% 
were satisfied with the Library's book collection. The 
library staff will conduct a complete collection analy- 
sis in 1993. 

The library installed a book security system after 
discovering hundreds of items were missing or lost in 
a recent inventory. This project was completed with 
the hard work of staff and volunteers and funded 
through State Aid money. 

In October, the Trustees voted to initiate a 3 
month planning process to assess library needs and 



67 



recommend future goals. These recommendations will 
be presented in February 1993. 

Programs 

The library conducted many Adult and Children's 
programs throughout the year. These included story- 
tellers, magicians, and workshops for Children. The 
library participated in a Statewide Summer Reading 
Program which had an Olympic sports theme. Nearly 
1000 children participated. An average of 7 pre-school 
storyhours were conducted each week at the MacKay 
Branch and Children's Library. Adult programs 
included lectures, workshops, and a winter film 
series. In October, the Library sponsored a full day 
Freelance Writer's Workshop. Fifty aspiring writers 
participated in this program. The MacKay Branch 
Library initiated a Tea for Tuesdays lecture program 
and continued its monthly mystery writers discussion 
group. 

Personnel 

Constance Spickler, a library assistant in the Chil- 
dren's Department resigned. She was replaced by 
Maria O'Reilly. 

Volunteers 

In December the annual volunteer reception hon- 
ored several volunteers who assisted the library 
throughout the year. Volunteers conducted story- 
hours, inventories, and a library user survey. They 
assisted with filing, typing, shelving, shelf reading, 
and equipment maintenance. 

The Friends of the Library booksale is one of the 
most successful sales in the State. The three day event 
attracts bibliophiles from around New England. The 
Friends of the Library assisted with special projects 
and made many donations throughout the year, 
including furniture for the MacKay Branch and 
Adams Library, museum passes, Infotrac, and 2 CD- 
ROM workstations. 

Facilities 

The second floor of the MacKay Branch was 
painted and carpeted. Throughout the year, the 
library site committee worked to obtain a site for a 
new or expanded library. The Library Trustees and 
Director worked with the Chelmsford Handicapped 
Commission in planning for future handicapped 
accessibility in all buildings. The Board of Library 
Trustees is committed to equal service and accessibil- 
ity to all residents. 

Goals 

In 1993, the library hopes to secure land to 
expand the Adams Library Building; improve the 



library collections, and increase library hours and 
staff. Special attention will be given to providing 
handicapped access and in improving the scope and 
depth of the library's non-fiction collection. We will 
continue to work to provide quality library service to 
our residents despite the shortfalls of the library facili- 
ties. Special acknowledgement is given to the Library 
staff, Board of Trustees, Library Site Committee, the 
Friends, volunteers and our users for making 1992 a 
successful year. 

Statistical Reports 

Monies deposited with Town Treasurer from fines, 
lost materials and fees $18,555.84 

Circulation 3 1 7 ,552 

Reference questions 16,588 

Staff 10 full time 

Part-time 7.9 (F.T.E.) 

Departments: 

Children's: Cheryl Zani 
Circulation: Linda Robinson 
Community Service: Judy Buswick 
MacKay Branch: Rona Call 
Maintenance: Jake Reslow 
Reference: Sandra Yensen 
Technical Service: Laura Kulik 

Library Site Committee: 

D. Lorraine Lambert, Chair Nancy Knight 

Kathryn Brough Carl Olsson 

William Gilet Al Sidel 

Gregory Gilleland John Sousa 

Dorothy Howard Sarah Warner 



Cynthia Kaplan 



Mary Mahoney, ex-officio 



PLANNING BOARD 

James P. Good, Chairman 

Christine A. Gleason, Vice Chairman 

Eugene E. Gilet, Clerk 

James M. Creegan 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 

Kim J. MacKenzie 

John J. McCarthy 

Rayann E. Miethe, Principal Clerk 

At the reorganization meeting of 1992, the 
Chelmsford Planning Board elected the above-named 
officers. Mr. Eugene Gilet was also chosen to repre- 
sent the Board at the Northern Middlesex Council of 
Government. Mr. Kim MacKenzie also continues to 
represent the Board on the Affordable Housing Com- 
mittee. Ms. Christine Gleason represents the Board 



68 



on the Traffic and Safety Committee. With Mrs. Ann 
McCarthy not running for reelection, the Board wel- 
comes Mr. James Creegan elected by the citizens to 
fill the vacancy. 

The Planning Board office is open to the public 
on a part-time basis with office hours 8:30 A.M. to 
12:30 P.M. daily. 

When the Planning Board function was created by 
the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 
70, its function was to oversee the development of the 
Town. They are also responsible for a careful study of 
the Town resources, keeping in mind the needs and 
conditions required to maintain the health and wel- 
fare of the citizenship. The Board's primary function 
is the approval of any plans for the development of 
the town and the appropriate housing for its citizens. 
The Board must strictly comply with all Zoning Regu- 
lations, Town By-Laws, Town Rules and Regulations 
and any State Laws and Mandates. Additional func- 
tions include, not not limited to, the subdividing of 
property, reviewing any changes to the Town's regu- 
lations through a public hearing process, recommen- 
dations and reports to Town Meeting and producing 
an official town map. 

In the year 1992, construction is continuing to 
experience a placidity in development. Therefore, the 
Board has invested some of their time to different 
areas. We, in conjunction with the Town Engineer, 
are currently hoping to have some of the unapproved 
streets brought up to conditions acceptable by the 
Town representatives. Also, the Board is starting to 
review the Aquifer Protection District, with the hopes 
of strengthening the regulations to bring into compli- 
ance with the Massachusetts Department of Environ- 
mental Protection. 

A total of sixteen (16) hearings were held. Eight 
of these were rezoning of land issues. The remaining 
eight (8) hearings resulted in two (2) two-lot subdivi- 
sions approved, one (1) Aquifer protection permit 
issued, two (2) site plans revised, two (2) site plans 
approved and one (1) residential site plan still in the 
approval process. In addition, the Board approved 
twenty-nine (29) Form A Subdivision Control Law 
Not Required Plans. 



69 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




(Front) Mark Perhello, Student Representative; Mary Frantz, Chairman; Richard Moser, Superin- 
tendent. (Rear) Judith Mallette; Wendy Marcks, Secretary; Carl Olsson; Barbara Ward, Vice Chair- 



Mrs. Mary Frantz has served as Chairman of the 
Chelmsford School Committee for the 1992-93 school 
year. She was supported by Mrs. Barbara Ward, Vice 
Chairman; Mrs. Wendy Marcks, Secretary; and Mrs. 
Judith Mallette and Mr. Carl Olsson, Members at 
Large. Central administration for the school depart- 
ment has included: Dr. Richard Moser, Superinten- 
dent; Dr. David Troughton, Assistant Superintendent; 
Mr. Sylvester Ingeme, Business Manager; Mr. Bernard 
DiNatale, Director of Educational Technology; Mr. 
Robert Zollo, Administrator of Special Education and 
Mr. Scott Johnson, Director of Community Services. 

The prospect of education reform and the need 
for reorganization of the grade configuration of our 
schools have dominated the work of our school com- 
mittee, administrators, and educators this school 
year. Both issues will have a major impact on the 
future of our schools and our ability to maintain qual- 
ity education for Chelmsford youth. 

State legislators have been debating educational 
reform initiated during the 1991-92 school year. 
Reform areas include: governance of our schools; 
roles and responsibilities of school committee mem- 
bers, superintendent, administrators, and teachers; 
school based management and school based councils, 
professional development, and restructuring of the 
funding formula for State Aid. Debate has been 



extensive and complicated. At the time of this writ- 
ing, no resolution to the legislation is forthcoming. 
Cities and towns throughout the State are waiting 
patiently for direction, particularly in the area of 
school finance. 

The Chelmsford schools received an additional 
$511,500 in State Aid this year. The funds were very 
helpful in maintaining class size with the addition of 
staff members at the elementary, middle and sec- 
ondary levels. However, no commitment has been 
made at the State level to maintain this support for 
the 1993-94 school year, and future funding may be 
limited as a result of a reconfiguration of the funding 
formula. Resolution of these financial issues is 
expected in the near future. 

The Chelmsford schools continue to grow at over 
one hundred students per year. Overcrowding at 
Westlands, South Row, Byam, and McCarthy required 
the development of a reorganization committee. The 
work of the committee resulted in a vote by the 
Chelmsford School Committee for a two year reorga- 
nization into four elementary schools housing K-4 stu- 
dents, two middle schools for youngsters in Grades 5- 
8, and continuation of a 9-12 high school on the cur- 
rent campus. Reorganization requires redistricting, 
and a second committee has been formed to develop 
alternative plans for next year. 



70 



The commitment to quality education in Chelms- 
ford remains strong. The Chelmsford School Commit- 
tee is appreciative of the work of parents, community 
members, staff, and students throughout the school 
year. The welfare of our students is our top priority, 
and we look forward to future opportunities to serve 
our youth. 

FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

As the new principal of CHS, I have been privi- 
leged to be the leader of your high school since July 
1, 1992, and I have found a wonderful, supportive 
community that can and should be very proud of its 
high school, committed and talented faculty, deans, 
support staff, and, most especially and significantly, 
students. Students are the backbone of any school, 
and we in Chelmsford have some of the finest I have 
ever met. The student body is enthusiastic and 
involved, talented and creative, and, most assuredly, 
trustworthy. I cannot think of a better place to be. 



from the principal of 
McCarthy middle school 

The McCarthy Middle School strives to provide a 
comprehensive academic environment where all stu- 
dents develop positive behavior patterns, positive 
social interactions, and strong self-images with input 
cooperation, and support from faculty, parents and 
community. 

The enrollment of the McCarthy Middle School 
has remained at 1200 students in grades, six, seven, 
and eight throughout the 1992-93 school year. 

In the month of August, a letter was sent to the 
parents of each McCarthy student discussing both the 
academic and extracurricular programs of the middle 
school. Parents were invited to attend the PTO meet- 
ings and to offer their input as to the needs of our 
students. 

This year for the first time, each sixth and sev- 
enth grade student received a "Reminder Binder" 
notebook in which to plan and organize their daily 
assignments. The administration and faculty would 
like to thank the McCarthy Middle School PTO for 
their encouragement and financial support for this 
worthwhile project. 

The continuation of the integration/inclusion of 
special education students in the regular classrooms 
has reached all three grade levels. This integration of 
special education students provides increased expo- 
sure to new and interesting subject matter as well as 
the opportunity to interact socially with a diverse 



group of students. As our efforts in integration con- 
tinue, we would anticipate the maximum inclusion of 
all students to fulfill their anticipated potential. 

As a pilot project this year, a team of faculty 
looked to provide an alternative to the traditional 
teaching day for a small number of students who had 
not been successful. Mentors for each student were 
recruited from the faculty, senior citizens volunteered 
to act as homework tutors, and community organiza- 
tions were enlisted to provide a service component for 
each student. The program has been beneficial to 
each of the students and has provided them with the 
opportunity to experience success. 

The teaming approach to the delivery of curricu- 
lum has been fully implemented in grades six and 
seven. With the possibility of two middle schools in 
the immediate future, we are looking forward to 
implementing interdisciplinary teams at the eighth 
grade level. The McCarthy Middle School held its first 
theme day, "Election 1992," on November 2nd. On 
this day, the instruction in each of the classes focused 
on the process and effects of the national election on 
each American citizen. Each student was afforded the 
opportunity to become a "registered voter" and to 
cast his ballot in the school-wide election for national 
and state candidates. 

Our annual "Earth Day" celebration is held on 
the last Monday in April. We are pleased to have rep- 
resentatives of state and local government joining us 
in this effort to show our concern for preserving our 
planet. We welcome the community at large to join us 
in this event. 

The McCarthy Middle School has again shown its 
commitment to the community in our annual "KISS" 
(Kids In Support of Seniors) walkathon. The monies 
raised through this intergenerational event are 
donated to the Chelmsford Senior Citizens Center. 

The computer education facilities continue to be 
utilized by all departments. Mrs. Sheila Kelly is to be 
commended for her efforts in working with students 
and staff to increase our use of new technology. 

This year, the students of the McCarthy Middle 
School collected over 21,000 items of food for the 
needy of Greater Lowell in our 17th annual "Project 
300." This effort on behalf of the needy once again 
demonstrates the compassion and concern for others 
exhibited by the members of the school and commu- 
nity. We would be remiss if we did not acknowledge 
the commitment and effort of Ted Dulski, "Mr. Pro- 
ject 300." Mr. Dulski retires this year, after 34 years 
as a social studies teacher in the Chelmsford School 
system. 



71 



Finally the students, faculty, and administration 
of the McCarthy Middle School look forward to the 
challenges ahead as we forge our way into the 21st 
century. 

FROM THE GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

Post Secondary Education Placements 

In 1992, there were 358 graduates. Of those grad- 
uates, 319 went on to post-secondary education which 
represents 89%. 



4 year colleges 
2 year colleges 
technical schools 
and post graduates 



266 

47 

_6 
319 



(74%) 
(13%) 

(2%) 
89% 



In terms of non-educational placements, 29 stu- 
dents elected employment, three joined the military, 
six students were foreign exchange students and one 
student was undecided. 

Advanced Placement Program 

In May of 1992, 130 students took 196 Advanced 
Placement Examinations at Chelmsford High School 
with 74% of the grades falling in the 3-5 range. The 
program grades on a five-point college-level scale: 

5 - extremely well qualified 

4 - well qualified 

3 - qualified 

2 - possibly qualified 

1 - no recommendation 

Generally, AP grades of 4 and 5 are comparable 
to college grades of A, and grades of 3 and 2 most 
comparable to college grades of B and C, respectively. 
Many colleges will award a third to a full year of 
placement and credit to successful AP candidates. 

Drop Out Rate: 

The drop out rate at Chelmsford High School 
continues to be low. During the 1991-92 academic 
year, CHS had a total student enrollment of 1499. 
The number of drop outs was 17, which represents a 
drop out rate of 1.1%. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 1991-92 



Boys 
Girls 


Req. to 

Employment Leave 
1 2 
1 


Voluntary 
Withdrawal 

8 

5 


Total 
11 
6 


Total 


1 3 


13 


17 



Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores (SAT) 

Chelmsford High School average scores for the 
Class of 1992 continue to be higher than the average 



Massachusetts and National Scores. In the verbal 
area, Chelmsford's average score was 457 which is 29 
points higher than the State average (428) and 34 
points higher than the National average (423). 

In the math area, Chelmsford scored 499 which is 
25 points higher than the State average (474) and 23 
points higher than the National average (476). 

Service Study and Career Exploration Program 

In the 1991-92 academic year, 113 students 
enrolled in eight Service Study and Career Explo- 
ration programs. 

The Service Study Program is a voluntary elective 
designed to combine practical experience with the 
students' academic studies as they use their free time 
to pursue an area similar to their chosen field. There 
is an opportunity for students to assist our athletic 
trainer, and there are several programs designed for 
students who are interested in working with special 
needs children. 

The Career Exploration Program gives a unique 
opportunity to all students to supplement their sched- 
ule and gain insight and experience as they volunteer 
to assist in our offices, library, science lab and televi- 
sion studio. 

Scheduling for these programs is flexible, and the 
electives may be taken for one semester or the entire 
year. All students are placed in their preferred area 
and credits are distributed according to the number of 
periods they work, their performance and attendance. 

Career Center 

The Chelmsford High School Career Center is a 
facility utilized by our students and members of the 
community to research colleges, occupations, and 
vocational schools. Part of this research is accom- 
plished through the use of computers which give 
available information on colleges (two year through 
graduate school), occupations, and financial aid. For 
students who do not know what line of endeavor they 
wish to pursue, there is a specific file which will give 
helpful suggestions. In addition, there is an infinite 
variety of books available for research. 

College catalogues, applications, and financial aid 
information as well as registration information for the 
S.A.T. and Achievement tests are housed in the 
Career Center. A V.C.R. is available with a wide 
assortment of more than 125 tapes in our library. 

Numerous college representatives visit the high 
school as well as speakers from business, industry, 
colleges, and business schools. These speakers give 
informative presentations to various classes. Military 
personnel visit for recruiting purposes and scholarship 



72 



information. 

During the school year, our juniors as well as var- 
ious classes are introduced to the Career Center with 
an orientation presentation. 

For students interested in immediate employ- 
ment, positions on a part-time and permanent basis 
are posted and employment counseling is available. 

FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR 
OF SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Massachusetts' Chapter 766 and the Federal Gov- 
ernment's Public Law 94-142, the Education of 
Handicapped Children Act, were enacted to assure 
that all handicapped children have a free and appro- 
priate education to be provided by the local commu- 
nity. 

The Special Education Department in Chelmsford 
is responsible for providing effective programs and 
services for children, ages three through twenty-one, 
who are found to have special needs. 

Part of this responsibility is to assure that each 
handicapped student receives an education designed 
to meet his or her unique learning needs and to 
receive the services in the least restrictive environ- 
ment. 

As of December 1, 1992, the Special Education 
Department had 805 students registered to receive 
special education services, which represents 15 per- 
cent of Chelmsford's total school enrollment. 

A staff of seventy-three special education person- 
nel develop and implement the individual educational 
plans for these students. For those students with 
severe learning and/or emotional needs, Chelmsford 
provides for placement in private day or residential 
schools as approved by the State Department of Edu- 
cation. 

The Regular Education Initiative Task Force 
(1991-1992) was established to define ways of restruc- 
turing special/regular education programming to sup- 
port integration of students with learning problems. 
Their completed report was presented to the School 
Committee in September 1992. 

For the 1992-1993 school year, staff is involved in 
extensive training in Teacher Assistant Teams to 
address the pre-referral process for the purpose of 
providing for the needs of all students. Workshops are 
also being conducted for staff and parents to develop 
an inclusion model for all students. 

For the 1992-1993 school year, the Chelmsford 



Special Education Department has a budget of 
$3,741,944 of which $350,275 is provided through 
grants by the federal government. 

The Special Education Department will continue 
its quest to provide effective and cost efficient pro- 
grams and services for the children we serve. 

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

During 1992 the Office of Community Education 
assumed the additional duty of overseeing the Depart- 
ment of Student Services. The Director will now be 
working with guidance and support staff K-12 as well 
as managing evening Adult Education, Summer 
School, Child Care and the ABC's enrichment pro- 
gram. 

Evening school, which includes Northeastern and 
Middlesex college courses, continues to attract 
approximately 700 students per semester, Fall, Winter 
and Spring. Summer School (K-Adult) offers both 
enrichment and remedial courses to both Chelmsford 
and area students for five weeks in July and August. 

Child care programs provide valuable services to 
school age children 50 weeks of the year from 7:00 
a.m. through 6:00 p.m. Preschool classes for three 
and four year olds are also available. Enrichment 
Education opportunities have been expanded K-8 
with approximately 1500 students actively involved in 
our ABC's programs. 

The School Department is proud to offer these 
self-supporting programs to the community. Please 
look for the Community Education brochure which is 
mailed to all residents during August, December, and 
March. 

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

Since 1981 the School Department has operated 
its own in-house computer service bureau. All major 
outside computer services bureau contracts have been 
terminated. During this time all major business and 
student applications have been automated on our own 
computer systems, a PDP 11/44 and a VAX/750. To 
supplement this business computer connection, all the 
schools have microcomputers which perform word 
processing, spreadsheets and data base applications. 

Many of the computer systems which are used in 
these business applications are nearing the 10 year 
mark. The hardware and software is approaching the 
end of its cost effective life. Older computer technolo- 
gies are more expensive to maintain and do not take 
advantage of the ability to reduce our operating costs 



73 



with newer electronic technology. Above all, the 
development of software and information systems 
must be focused on maximizing the value and utility 
of information while minimizing the cost and effort to 
the user. 

With these objectives in mind, the schools and 
town offices hope to implement LAN's (Local Area 
Networks) to include the whole range of distributed 
and network computing. 

Other town departments served in some way by 
the School Computer Services Department include: 
Town Clerk, Council on Aging, Town Accountant, 
Town Candidates for Office, Town Library, Select- 
men's School Warrant Report, Community Education, 
PTA, Booster Club, Nashoba Valley Technical Voca- 
tional School, Police Department, Commission of 
Handicapped, Sewer Commission and Planning 
Board. 



grades five through twelve marched in the annual 
Memorial Day and Fourth of July parades. At the 
regional and state levels, Chelmsford's music students 
were well represented at the Junior and Senior North- 
east District Music Festivals as well as the All-State 
Concert. 

The successes of these secondary art and music 
students are the result of careful preparation and 
training that begins at the earliest grade levels in ele- 
mentary school art and music classes. In these classes 
students learn the basic skills and concepts needed to 
attain such sophisticated achievements in the upper 
grades. In addition, students learn self -discipline and 
cooperative learning skills that will assist them 
throughout their lives. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
FOR ATHLETICS 

(Grades 9-12) 



Our present administrative computer budget is 
lower than the budget for outside computer service 
bureaus in 1980. This reflects our continued effort, 
over the past decade, to provide administrative com- 
puting at a level funded cost. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT 
HEAD FOR FINE ARTS 

The Chelmsford Public Schools' Fine Arts Depart- 
ment continued to do its best to educate the students 
of Chelmsford in art and music. With the support of 
the administration, the Cultural Council, and the 
Chelmsford Friends of Music, the Fine Arts Depart- 
ment offered a wide variety of experiences for stu- 
dents. 

The monthly art shows in the Administration 
Building's Frank Page Gallery continued in 1991-92, 
drawing rave reviews from visitors. In addition, each 
school showcased student work during "Youth Art 
Month" in March at the annual Town -Wide Art Show 
with approximately 300 works (from grades one 
through twelve) on exhibit. The level of accomplish- 
ment by the student artists was indeed impressive. 
Chelmsford students also received many awards at 
the Boston Glove Scholastic Art Competition and at 
Art All-State. 

In the music area of the Fine Arts Department, 
the popular Town-Wide Choral Festival in March and 
the Town-Wide String Festival in May drew large 
audiences to these showcases for the vocal and string 
students of Chelmsford. Of course, schools held win- 
ter and spring concerts, either in their own buildings 
or in the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium. The 
high school musical was once again an unqualified 
success in May. Instrumentally, band members from 



The Chelmsford High School Athletic Department 
during the 1991-92 school year fielded 29 Varsity Pro- 
grams, 15 Junior Varsity Programs, 1 Sophomore Pro- 
gram, 6 Freshman Programs, and 3 Seasonal Student 
Trainer Programs. An overall record from 359 Varsity 
Contests was 213-128-18 with 991 Athletes and 26 
Team Managers involved in the program. 

FROM THE ENGLISH 

DEPARTMENT HEAD 

(Grades 9-12) 

In October of 1992, the English Department of 
Chelmsford High School received a Commendation of 
Excellence from the National Council Teachers of 
English for its efforts toward improving writing for 
the 1991-1992 academic year. This award was given in 
conjunction with the recognition of Martha Seneta, 
Class of 1993, by the NCTE for her outstanding 
achievement in writing as judged through her partici- 
pation in the annual writing recognition contest. 

The achievement of a first place in the state and 
second place nationally was earned by our top ten 
scorers in the national Ninth Grade Language Arts 
Olympiad. In addition, our students have received 
recognition through participation in a variety of activ- 
ities. Joshua Friedman, Maral Jeknavorian, and Mai 
Tuyet, all members of the Class of 1994, were hon- 
ored for their achievements in writing through the 
UMass/Amherst Excellence in Expository Writing Pro- 
gram. Beth Le Maire, a member of the Class of 1992, 
was awarded the Bard College Prize for Critical Writ- 
ing. Aaron Bates, a member of the Class of 1994, 
placed third locally and went on to compete region- 
ally in the Voice of Democracy speech writing contest 
sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Our hon- 
ors students continue to perform exceptionally well 



74 



on the English AP standardized exam. 

The teachers of the high school English Depart- 
ment continue to develop new strategies to assist all 
students toward achieving the goals of our curricu- 
lum. Our efforts to communicate the importance of 
writing across the curriculum is demonstrated by the 
display of writing done in social studies and science 
classes for the Writings On the Wall (WOW) program 
which began in 1991. Teachers have been attending a 
workshop on Cooperative Learning for high school 
students. We purchased spell checkers for each Eng- 
lish classroom to assist students during writing 
process workshops. The use of the Writing Lab has 
expanded to include more students in year long 
courses as well as in the writing electives. The use of 
the lab equipped with Mac computers positively 
altered the students' attitudes toward writing. It 
encouraged them to revise and gave them a product 
of which they could be proud. It encouraged them to 
work together as peer readers. This was especially 
true for the often labeled non-academic students. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SOCIAL STUDIES 

(Grades 6-8) 

This was the year of Columbus and the Presiden- 
tial Election. All classes began with activities sur- 
rounding the founding of the Americas by Columbus. 

Games, plays, poems and videos were evident 
throughout all curriculum areas. The entire school 
participated in Election 92. Students were given the 
issues, discussed the presidency, studied aspects of 
the Constitution re: the presidency. All students regis- 
tered to vote and took part in a simulated election 
with the exact 1992 ballot. In January, we celebrated 
Martin Luther King Day and Mrs. Paresky's class did 
a Choral reading during an assembly. National Geog- 
raphy Bee was again a successful event. In the 6th 
grade we have had community involvement in the 
form of citizens coming into the classroom to speak 
about their former countries. Two of our social stud- 
ies teachers attended the Inaugural and shared their 
expertise and excitement with their students. We are 
saddened that this is Mr. Thaddeus Dulski's last year 
as he will be retiring in September of 1993. The 
department is in the process of updating its maps and 
researching new updated geography texts in grades 6 
and 7. 

FROM THE ENGLISH 
DEPARTMENT HEAD 

(Grades 6, 7 & 8) 

During the 1991-92 school year, many new, inter- 
esting projects and events occurred in the grade 6 to 8 
language arts area. 



In the area of curriculum the staff implemented a 
mini-unit on responding to open-ended questions 
since that was to be the format for the revised Mass. 
Assessment Test. The seventh grade staff unified the 
literature based vocabulary program and developed 
supporting materials for the various lessons. Grade 6 
teachers developed a diagnostic test in basic grammar 
skills: a post-test will follow if the prototype works. 
Eighth grade staff explored the new literature text 
that was adopted: they also prepared a working out- 
line for speech activities. 

Several curriculum related projects occurred like 
the school- wide spelling bee. The department head 
received a grant which enabled 200 sixth graders to 
attend an MRT production. Also, an enrichment unit 
involving interdisciplinary skills was introduced at 
grade 6: students created their own countries each 
with its own currency, flag, folk culture, geography, 
etc. In addition, the annual Betty Murray Writing 
Award went to seventh grader Jennifer Hardy. 
Finally, we instituted a bonus points reading program 
where youngsters could receive extra points for out- 
side reading they did; the program also involved the 
support and involvement of parents. 

We are also pleased that several of our youngsters 
had their writing published in national magazines. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

(Grades 7-12) 

The foreign language program continues to thrive 
in Chelmsford. More students are opting to complete 
a third or fourth year of a language sequence as col- 
leges continue to emphasize the importance of foreign 
language study. Even Massachusetts state four-year 
colleges have a minimum two-year language admis- 
sions requirement. French and Spanish students com- 
monly choose to take the College Board Achievement 
Test and/or the Advanced Placement Language Exam. 
Scheduling constraints at the upper levels of the lan- 
guage sequences often make it impossible for students 
to continue with their language studies at CHS, and 
we hope that more innovative scheduling in the 
future will alleviate this problem. 

Interest in the exchange programs has been wan- 
ing for the past few years, in large part due to the 
downturn in the economy. We were able to continue 
the French, Spanish, and Italian exchanges this year, 
but it is becoming increasingly difficult to generate 
enthusiasm and support for these programs. We 
hosted students from Toulouse, France, but we did 
not send any students to France. CHS did participate 
in the Italian and Spanish exchanges by hosting and 
sending students. 



75 



This year, one Spanish and one French class at 
CHS participated in several monthly interactive televi- 
sion programs dealing with timely aspects of French, 
Spanish and Hispanic cultures. The sessions were con- 
ducted in the foreign language, and during the broad- 
casts, CHS students had an opportunity to dialog 
with the native speakers hosting and participating in 
the programs. The programs are part of MASSLeam- 
Pike, a satellite-and computer-based educational net- 
work operated by the Massachusetts Corporation for 
Educational Communication (MCET). 

At McCarthy, the FLEX language/reading course 
was moved to the 8th grade curriculum. All students 
who took developmental or enrichment reading were 
also scheduled for a semester of FLEX. Students who 
go on to the high school next year should be well pre- 
pared to choose and begin the study of a foreign lan- 
guage. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF PRACTICAL ARTS 

(Grades 7-12) 

Business Education 

The Business Education Department recognizes 
each students' personal, career and vocational goals. 
With this recognition in mind as well as the facilities, 
technology and equipment available at Chelmsford 
High School, the staff members of the Business Edu- 
cation Department are ready to help prepare today's 
youth for tomorrow's job market. They are also ready 
to help provide a varied and diverse business back- 
ground to satisfy the personal needs of students pur- 
suing other career goals and/or desiring practical arts 
credit. 

The Business Education Department presently has 
four full time teachers and share a fifth teacher with 
the Social Studies Department. June 1992 saw the 
retirement of another veteran teacher when Ms. 
Conant retired from the Business staff so she could 
spend "time and money" on her grandchildren. Best 
of luck in both endeavors Meg. James Murphy has 
been added to the department and brings new energy 
and insight into the area of Word Processing and 
Marketing. Our current staff members have expertise 
in a wide range of Business and Distributive Educa- 
tion subject areas. Subjects taught are Introduction to 
Business, Typing I, Typing II, Speed Writing, 
Accounting I, Accounting II, Word Processing I, Word 
Processing II, Business BASIC, Fashion Merchandis- 
ing, Marketing, and Management. Management is a 
new, one semester course open to students that have 
completed a marketing course. The concepts will be 
integrated into actual store and fundraising manage- 
ment operations including buying, selling, promoting, 
analyzing cash flow, maintaining records and fore- 



casting projections. 

The DECA Club, an Association of Marketing 
students, experienced another successful and growth- 
oriented year as 80 students participated at the Dis- 
trict Level Career Conference at the Lowell Hilton in 
January of 1992 with 55 students dominating the dis- 
trict by capturing top district honors qualifying them 
to represent the Chelmsford Chapter of DECA at the 
Annual State Conference in Falmouth, MA in March 
of 1992. At the State Conference over 55 Massachu- 
setts schools are represented and six Chelmsford stu- 
dents received the first, second or third place trophy 
as top in the state which qualified them to attend the 
National Career Conference in Anaheim, CA. Experi- 
encing the thrill of a National Conference with over 
8,000 students in attendance were Jennifer Ferron 
representing the State of Massachusetts in Apparel & 
Accessories, Linda Meuse in Apparel & Accessories 
Written Event, Ethan Roberts and Andy Shupe in 
Food Marketing, Matthew Moncreaff in Advertising & 
Display, Manjula Sastry in the Fashion Promotion 
Plan as well as Tara Greaves who captured the 2nd 
place trophy in Food Marketing Written Event. 
Chelmsford was overwhelmed as Ethan Roberts fin- 
ished 2nd place as a National Winner in Food Mar- 
keting. Ethan was Chelmsford's first National Career 
Conference Winner. 

"For Just One Moment," was the theme of the 
dazzling Spring & Summer Fashion Show held as an 
annual culminating project and fundraiser by the 
Merchandising and Marketing classes. Seventy stu- 
dent models strutted fashions oriented toward senior 
week as well as outdoor summer fun. 

The Senior Center was transformed into a fashion 
stage as Markus of Chelmsford opened with models 
showcasing his original hand painted designs, Patter- 
son's of Lowell presented its new line of exercise and 
dance wear, The Gap of the Pheasant Lane Mall dis- 
played its patriotic theme of classics in red, white and 
blue. The Fashion Bug of Lowell showed the audience 
how to mix and match with its Spring and Summer 
line of casuals, separates, and dresses. Pamelas Spe- 
cialty Shop from North Road featured many separates 
that had been stylishly accessorized with hats, belts, 
and jewelry. Afternoon Delight featured dresses with 
a vintage and retro look! And Norman's Men's Shop 
utilized a spectacular display theme of casual classics 
from jeans to sport coats. The culminating fashions of 
the evening were prom gowns distinctively featuring 
beads, appliques, gold and silver lame and sequins. A 
vast array of formal tuxedos were featured all ele- 
gantly color coordinated with matching tie and cum- 
merbunds. Formal wear shops participating in the 
show included Mederic's Boutique, Levine's Formal 



76 



Shop, House of Concetta, Billerica Formal Shop, 
Bonardi's Formals, and Mr. Tux. Donating their hair 
and cosmetic services to the young aspiring models 
were the stylists and technicians from Alycia's of 
Andover. Dan Dube donated his time as the disc 
jockey coordinating all the music. Participating ven- 
dors at the show included: Anne Marie's Monogram- 
ming, Beatrice Friedman, Color Image Consultant, 
Dracut Limousine Service, Feeney the Florist, For 
Nails Only and Domino's Pizza. Refreshments were 
donated by Bakeryland, Purity Supreme and Alexan- 
ders. Special Guest Appearances were made by 
Andrea Smith, Miss Greater Lowell; and Mystery 
Models, Dean Jack Conrad and Dean Angie Taranto. 
Coordination and commentary by Ms. Beverly Con- 
way, Advisor. 

Robert LoPresti from the Class of 1992 was the 
recipient of a wall plaque from the Chelmsford High 
School Faculty Association for outstanding achieve- 
ment in the area of Business Education. As part of 
the award, he also received a cash award from the 
Chelmsford High School Alumni Association. 

Consumer Education 

The seventh and eighth grade Consumer Educa- 
tion curriculum is a ten week co-ed program empha- 
sizing basic living skills for family life in three areas. 
Sewing teaches students how to repair a seam, sew a 
button, and provides for creative expression in choos- 
ing a machine sewing project to meet individual abili- 
ties. Food lab covers topics such as kitchen equip- 
ment, safety, organization and management during 
the preparation of nutritious and seasonal foods. The 
third area is the family living/decision-making unit in 
which students learn how to make food choices using 
nutritional information, how to build self-confidence, 
setting values, and career choices. 

Family And Consumer Technology 

All courses in Family And Consumer Technology 
(F.A.C.T.) are semester courses so students can 
explore unit areas that may interest them. Courses 
offered each semester are Foods & Nutrition/Interior 
Design, Foods & Nutrition/Textiles & Clothing, 
Chef's I, Chef's II, Exploring Early Childhood I, 
Exploring Early Childhood II, and Independent 
Study-Exploring Early Childhood. 

The Early Childhood Education Program is a 
cooperative effort of the Family & Consumer Technol- 
ogy Department and Community Education. Students 
receive classroom instruction followed by practical 
experience in the preschool setting. Some Indepen- 
dent Study students, who are planning to specialize in 
Special Education are permitted to work with special 
needs children at the Harrington School. This is a 
popular class with many students going on to major 



in Elementary Education in college. 

Beth Wholey from the Class of 1992 was the 
recipient of a wall plaque from the Chelmsford High 
School Faculty Association for outstanding achieve- 
ment in the area of Family And Consumer Technol- 
ogy. As part of the award, she also received a cash 
award from the Chelmsford High School Alumni 
Association. Jessica Simard received the Pre- 
School/Child Development Award given by the Office 
of Community Education for excellence in the pre- 
school program. 

Technology Education 

Students at the McCarthy Middle School enjoy 
the design and construction of a race car and the 
design and construction of a dream house. Two new 
areas of instruction included the "Mousetrap" car and 
"Lego- Logo" as design and problem solving activities 
which were well received by the students. Although 
every student has Technology Education classes for 
only one quarter of the school year, they seem to 
benefit from the class and receive a great deal of 
insight into the World of Technology that is just 
ahead for them. 

Courses offered in the Technology Education 
Department at the High School include General 
Drafting, Architectural Drawing I, Architectural 
Drawing II, Technical Drawing I, Technical Drawing 
II, Tech. Ed. Exploratory, House Construction, Small 
Engine Repair I, Small Engine Repair II, and Elec- 
tronic Technology which includes both Analog & Dig- 
ital Electronics. 

The fall of 1992 saw the First Annual Boston 
Achitectural Center competition for high school stu- 
dents from all over New England. 

The BAC ARCHIFAIR was divided into three cat- 
egories with a student competing in two of the three 
divisions. The categories were 1. House Plans, 2. 
Models, 3. Pictorial Presentations. 2nd and 3rd place 
overall was captured by Chelmsford Students. Eric 
Ravenstein placed 2nd while Steven Beaucher placed 
3rd. 

Matthew Levesque from the Class of 1992 was the 
recipient of a wall plaque from the Chelmsford High 
School Faculty Association for outstanding achieve- 
ment in the area of Technology Education. As part of 
the award, he also received a cash award from the 
Chelmsford High School Alumni Association. 

It is my hope that parents will research these 
Practical Arts courses and encourage their daughters 
and sons to sign up and take advantage of the offer- 
ings while at C.H.S. Remember, graduation require- 
ments include 15 Credits of Practical Arts and 40 



77 



Credits of Elective Courses. 

FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The Chelmsford High School Mathematics 
Department continues to adapt its curriculum to meet 
the needs of all students while challenging every indi- 
vidual student to meet his or her academic potential. 

We received a positive report in the School Evalu- 
ation and are working on the recommendations made 
by the evaluation team. Many of our teachers have 
attended workshops and seminars on the following 
variety of topics: Cooperative Learning, Alternative 
Assessment, Regular Education Initiatives, Teacher 
Assistant Teams, and Technology Integration. 

Although we have made no major revisions in our 
curriculum content, we have recently adopted new 
texts in our level three Geometry and Algebra II 
courses. We are currently focusing in on a new Alge- 
bra Ill/Trigonometry text and are still looking for a 
new Calculus text for our "A" level class. Our stu- 
dents continue to perform well above the national 
average in the Mathematics section of the Scholastic 
Aptitude test. As usual our students did extremely 
well on the Advanced Placement examinations in Cal- 
culus AB, Calculus BC and Computer Science. The 
Calculus League and Computer Science League teams 
continue to excel in their competitions. 

At a time when there is so much national concern 
regarding the quality of mathematics education, 
Chelmsford High School remains fortunate to possess 
a highly motivated, well-qualified and dedicated staff. 
It is our consistent effort that will enable us to pro- 
vide the students of the Town of Chelmsford with the 
technical skills necessary to enable them to succeed in 
our increasingly complex and changing society. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF MATHEMATICS 

(Grades 6-8) 

The nature of Mathematics in the Middle School 
is one of diversification in curriculum and aptitude. It 
is the mission of the McCarthy Middle School Math 
Department to assist each student in achieving his/her 
individual potential within one of the five levels 
offered, including accelerated programs in Algebra 
and Geometry. With the emphasis on problem solv- 
ing, we have successfully introduced several math 
competition programs to challenge the average and 
above average students, and incorporate the use of 
hands-on math manipulative for the below average 
and remedial students. Approximately 900 students 



continue to compete in the Continental Math League 
and New England Math League Contests. 

Some new initiatives undertaken this year include 
the Math Counts National Competition Program and 
a Pre-algebra program in grades seven and eight. Our 
teachers, in addition to teaching regular classes, are 
actively continuing their education in the area of new 
programs and mainstreaming and are updating cur- 
riculum through the successful In-Service Workshop 
programs. Teachers also attend various conferences 
including the National Council of Teachers of Mathe- 
matics Regional Conference, conferences using math 
manipulative and conferences on cooperative learn- 
ing. 

The success of our program is evident in the 
accomplishments of several students who achieved 
perfect scores and received recognition for their par- 
ticipation in Continental Math League. Our results in 
National testing reinforces our belief that our goals 
are achievable and our methods are productive. 

This year the Robert McCullough Mathematics 
Trophy was awarded to Christopher Klick. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

The Physical Education Department is currently 
participating in two systemwide projects. As a prelim- 
inary step to a K-12 curriculum review, staff members 
are visiting other physical education programs 
statewide and preparing a K-12 analysis of each sys- 
tem visited. Through a series of in-service programs, 
the staff is being recertified in CPR. 

During the spring, all elementary schools will 
view the City Stage Company's production of 
FITKIDS which promotes fitness, good nutrition, and 
self-esteem. 

Last year the Growing Healthy elementary cur- 
riculum workshops were completed for grades 3-5 as 
well as begun for grades K-2. This spring the final 
workshops for grades K-2 will be completed. Addi- 
tional work was also completed on each grade level 
curriculum during the past summer. 

Other health education initiatives include the 
revision of the grade 6 curriculum; the continued suc- 
cess of the 8th grade CPR certification program; the 
planning of a 9th grade CPR recertification program; 
the organization of health seminars for grades 10-12; 
the preparation of various programs for the middle 
school and high school funded by the Drug Free 
Schools and Communities Grant; the initiation of 



78 



HIV/AIDS information sessions for systemwide staff 
and parents; as well as the implementation of various 
recommendations of the AIDS Task Force. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF SCIENCE 

(Grades 9-12) 

In an effort to keep ourselves and the curriculum 
updated, the science department staff has been busy 
attending various conferences and workshops. The 
entire department attended the National Science 
Teachers Association national convention in Boston. 

Mr. Bruce Ford received a mini-grant to finance a 
program of industry visitations by the physics teach- 
ers. Mr. Ford contacted several industries in the 
immediate vicinity of Chelmsford and made arrange- 
ments to visit industries that applied the concepts 
that are studied in the classroom. Besides Mr. Ford, 
Mr. John Mosto and Mr. Andy Sorenson participated 
in this program. If any of the readers are associated 
with industries that you feel we can benefit from visit- 
ing, please contact Mr. Ford at the high school. 

We have adopted a new physical science text- 
book. Mr. Paul Murphy, Mr. Michael Denihan, Mr. 
Ralph Sherwood, Mr. Bruce Ford and Mr. Michael 
Tate met for three days this summer to make the 
transition into the new textbook a smooth one. The 
text reflects the new National Science Teachers Asso- 
ciation's guidelines for teaching science of the 90's. 

Mr. Mosto, Mr. Tate and Mr. Sorenson also met 
for three days this summer to familiarize ourselves 
with the new interfacing devices we purchased from 
IBM. We are in the process of phasing out the old 
Apple He computers and phasing in IBM compatible 
machines. Thanks to a very generous grant from 
Hewlett-Packard, we are presently waiting for twelve 
new machines with all the necessary equipment to 
have a complete networked science computer labora- 
tory. We cannot begin to thank Hewlett-Packard 
enough for investing in the future of the youth of 
Chelmsford. 

Hewlett-Packard also sent Mr. Tate to San Fran- 
cisco for a week in August. Mr. Tate participated in a 
week-long workshop on chemicals in the environ- 
ment. The workshop was conducted by the Lawrence 
Hall of Science at the University of California, Berke- 
ley. 

Mr. John Prescott and Mr. Richard Luce attended 
an excellent workshop at UMass. Medical in Worces- 
ter. The most recent advancements in the field of 



biotechnology and medicine were the topics. This is 
an annual effort by the UMass. medical faculty to 
update science teachers in topics that are on the cut- 
ting edge of research. 

Mr. Bernard Queenan participated in the Boston 
University sponsored Project 2000. He spent three 
weeks this summer as well as one Saturday a month 
for the past school year investigating the new devel- 
opments in bio-technology. 

We would like to welcome our new science staff 
member Mrs. Patricia Mower. Mrs. Mower teaches 
physical science. We are indeed thankful that teachers 
of the quality of Mrs. Mower want to teach within 
our system. 

The Science Department of Chelmsford High 
School would like to thank you for your continued 
support. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF SCIENCE 

(Grades 6-8) 

Over the three years of middle school science, the 
students cover the physical sciences and the environ- 
mental issues in the sixth grade; the life sciences in 
the seventh grade; and the earth sciences in the 
eighth grade. 

The major goal of the middle school science cur- 
ricula is to teach the students organization, listening, 
note taking, logical thinking, and concept formation 
skills. These skills will assist them in the understand- 
ing and interpretation of the world around them. As 
the three years progress, students will become more 
involved in problem solving situations where they 
must form hypotheses, experiment, observe, record 
measured and collected data, and analyze results to 
form conclusions. 

During the 1992-1993 academic year, the teachers 
in the science department, in addition to their regular 
teaching schedule, have been involved in piloting and 
evaluating new science texts and materials, revising 
curricula, planning science field experiences, attend- 
ing conferences and workshops; and taking graduate 
courses in new technology, cooperative learning, 
mainstreaming and other current innovations in the 
science areas. To enrich the science curriculum, 
NASA space exploration and oceanography assem- 
blies were presented to the students. In addition, 
once again Stone Environmental School, will be used 
for the sixth grade program. 



79 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR SOCIAL STUDIES 

(Grades 9-12) 

The Chelmsford High School Social Studies 
Department has continued to offer a program that 
prepares well informed citizens capable of successfully 
participating in a complex, diverse world. While the 
core curriculum remains the same, the teachers con- 
tinue professional development and planning to meet 
the challenges of our constantly changing society. 

Students continue to study Political Science in the 
ninth grade, World or Ancient History in the tenth 
grade and United States History or American Studies 
in the eleventh grade. In the twelfth grade or when 
their schedule allows, they may still take electives in a 
variety of areas including Sociology, Psychology, 
International Relations, Asian History, Law, The 
Holocaust and Economics. 

Plans have been made to implement a five year 
textbook rotation. During the first year, all World 
History and Ancient History books will be replaced. 
As this cycle continues, students will always have 
quality texts with the most up-to-date content. 

Teachers have continued to participate in a vari- 
ety of professional development programs. A number 
attended the Northeast Regional Conference for the 
Social Studies. Others have attended Advanced Place- 
ment training sessions. Some have studied cooperative 
learning and some of those serve as local instructors. 
Training in newly-developed computer programs was 
given through a summer workshop. It is important 
that staff opportunities like these not only continues, 
but expand. 

Students are offered numerous opportunities to 
study, learn and compete beyond the confines of the 
classroom and the scope of the regular school day. 
Students attend Model United Nations Programs at 
St. John's High School, Harvard University and Bent- 
ley College. They run a one day Model UN for sev- 
enth grade students at McCarthy Middle School. They 
compete in the Century III Leadership Contest, 
Regional History Day, the Framingham State College 
Essay Contest and in the Massachusetts Bar Associa- 
tion's Mock Trial Competition. They learn about local 
government through the local Student Government 
Day program. They stay knowledgeable about world 
affairs through the Chelmsford Education Founda- 
tion's "News Quiz" Contest. 

People from the community are invited into the 
school to share their knowledge and expertise. The 



Town Manager, an expert on life in Japan, court offi- 
cers etc., have been in the classrooms. 

Field trips are offered when important to topics 
being studied in the curriculum. Newport, Rhode 
Island; Fruitlands Museum in Harvard, MA; the Low- 
ell National Park; the Kennedy Library and the 
Boston Public Library are some locations that are 
often visited. 

In summary, the Social Studies Department at 
CHS tries to teach in an academic setting and to sup- 
plement that experience with visitors, after school 
programs, and field trips. The teachers stay abreast of 
developments in their subject areas so that a quality- 
education is always offered. 

IN CONCLUSION: 

The School Committee wishes to extend the deep 
appreciation to the following staff members for their 
years of loyal and meritorious service and who have 
retired this past year: 



George Betses 
Sharon Cinsavich 
Meg Conant 
Helen Grivers 
Catherine Harper 
George Klesaris 
Marion Mello 

Jane Walker 

Eileen Fletcher 
Dorothy Upton 
Lorraine Lambert 
Rita Gamache 
Joseph Demers 
Roger Clermont 
Pauline Clermont 
Gladys Becht 



IN MEMORIAM: 



Principal of CHS 

Elementary Teacher, Parker School 

Business Teacher, CHS 

Elementary Teacher, Byam School 

Reading Teacher, CHS 

Science Teacher, CHS 

Reading Teacher, McCarthy Middle 

School 

Middle School Teacher, McCarthy 

Middle School 

Social Studies Teacher, CHS 

Secretary, Parker School 

Library Assistant, CHS 

Secretary, Special Education Dept. 

Maintenance Employee, Systemwide 

Custodian, Harrington School 

Food Service, CHS 

Educational Support Personnel 

Parker School 



The Community and the School Department were 
grieved by the deaths of Robert Lane, Custodian at 
the Westlands School and Dorothy Cullinane, Educa- 
tional Support Personnel at the Harrington School. 
They will long be remembered for their devotion to 
the children of the Town of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard H. Moser, Ph.D. 

Superintendent of Schools 



80 



REPORT OF THE SEWER COMMISSION 




Front Row: Vice Chairman Richard Day, Departmental Assistant Evelyn Newman, Chairman John P. Emerson, Jr. 
Back Row: Clerk Robert P. Joyce, Commissioner George Abely, Commissioner Barry Balan 



In 1992 the Chelmsford Sewer Commission 
became optimistic about the possibility for renewed 
federal funding from projects such as the Chelmsford 
Sewer Project. We have learned that the Clinton 
Administration has expressed interest in establishing 
an infrastructure rehabilitation project designed to 
"jump-start" the economy, known as the "Rebuild 
America" Program. According to preliminary informa- 
tion, the program will provide one-time grants for 
public works projects, including wastewater projects. 
However, the grants will only be available to those 
projects that are designed and ready to go to con- 
struction immediately upon approval of the legisla- 
tion. 

Fortunately, Chelmsford is currently in an excel- 
lent position to take advantage of such funding. We 
meet the criteria for eligibility and are positioned high 
on the state's priority list. Many other Massachusetts 
communities that have chosen to delay their waste- 



water projects until the economy improves will likely 
miss this small window of opportunity. In an effort to 
solidify Chelmsford's position and to show support 
for any legislation that will reduce the town's share of 
the sewer project cost, the Commission will be send- 
ing representatives to Washington in early April to 
meet with our congressional delegation. 

There was more good news for the Chelmsford 
Sewer Project in 1992 when the state Legislature 
passed legislation finalizing the Massachusetts State 
Revolving Loan Fund (SRF). The SRF has been in the 
works since 1989, when it was introduced as the 
state's new method of providing financial assistance 
to communities. The SRF provides interest subsidies 
and discounted loans. The Chelmsford Sewer Project 
will be eligible for 25% grant equivalency loans under 
this program. 

The optimism of 1992 was also fueled by the con- 



81 



tinued success of the ongoing sewer project. Sewer 
service became available in the Old Stage and Farms 
II Areas, and will become available in the Dominic 
Drive Area in early 1993. Construction commenced in 
the Farms I and Warren Avenue Areas. The Commis- 
sion continues to concentrate its efforts on extending 
lateral sewers to those residential areas identified by 
the wastewater facilities plan as having the greatest 
need for municipal sewers. The Farms II and Warren 
Avenue neighborhoods are in close proximity to the 
Chelmsford Center Water District water supply wells. 
The Old Stage, Dominic Drive, and Farms I Areas 
have historically suffered from severe on-site septic 
system problems due to shallow bedrock and/or high 
ground water conditions. 

The bid prices for the 1992 projects were 40% 
lower than the engineer's estimates made in 1988. 
The result was that the town nearly equated the 50% 
grant funding it had seen in the past by taking advan- 
tage of the weak economy and the competitive bid cli- 
mate. Although we were successful in 1992 while we 
waited for the State to finalize the SRF program, we 
have every intention of aggressively pursuing the SRF 
now that it has become available. The Chelmsford 
Sewer Commission remains committed to the maxi- 
mization of all potentially available state and federal 
financial assistance. 

Therefore, in order to take advantage of the 
State's new funding program and to be in position for 
any federal funding on the horizon, the Commission 
commenced design in the Westlands "A" and West- 
lands "B" neighborhoods in 1992. 



provided with municipal sewer service. This repre- 
sents 37% of the entire town. There still are 2,573 
homes scheduled to be serviced, representing 23% of 
town. When complete, the municipal project will pro- 
vide service to 6,802 homes and businesses, represent- 
ing 60% of the town. 

Once again, we are pleased to report that the 
sewer project to date, in excess of $38,000,000 of con- 
struction, has remained within budget. While we rec- 
ognize we've been fortunate, we also feel strongly 
that our management practices and cost control pro- 
grams have contributed to our success. We also are 
experiencing first hand the cost advantages of con- 
structing at a time when the bid climate of the con- 
struction industry is extremely competitive. 

The Commission would like to acknowledge our 
support staff, Evelyn Newman, Jacqueline Sheehy, 
and Gail Loiselle, for their hard work and meritorious 
service. Their multifaceted duties are shared by the 
Sewer Division of the Department of Public Works, 
and they are the individuals who interface with the 
public on a daily basis. 

Respectfully submitted, 
CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Richard J. Day, Vice Chairman 

Robert P. Joyce, Clerk 

George F. Abely 

Barry B. Balan 



As we look to the future, our efforts now concen- 
trate on extending lateral sewers to those residential 
areas identified by the wastewater facilities plan as 
having the greatest need for municipal sewers. The 
future areas to be serviced include: 



- North Road Area 

- Westford Street Area 

- Crystal Lake Area 

- East Chelmsford; and 

- Hart Pond 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 
TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR BRANCH 

Department Members: 

Charles F. Mansfield, Finance Director 

Carol R. Lambert, Assistant Treasurer 

Bettie A. Osborne, Accts. Payable/Receivable Clerk 

Judith A. Olsson, Part-time, Legal Clerk 

Joan L. Garland, Data Processing Clerk 

Anna M. Griffin, Accts. Payable/Receivable Clerk 



As part of the phased program approved by vot- 
ers in 1989, the future areas to be sewered include 
neighborhoods with failing septic systems, septic sys- 
tems which cannot be repaired due to poor soils 
and/or high groundwater; and those within the drink- 
ing water aquifer. 

To date, 4,299 homes and businesses have been 



The retirement of James R. Doukszewicz and 
Margaret M. Mullen occurred this year leaving the 
office with the loss of two dedicated employees. Anna 
Griffin came to the office from the Fire Department 
to fill Margaret Mullen's position. 

In restructuring the payroll processing was 
assigned to the Accounting Department and the Pay- 



82 



roll coordinator's position was transferred. This 
restructuring was to reduce duplication of work in the 
Treasurer's office and the Accounting Department. 

The coming year will be one of transition. There 
will be future restructuring and greater automation to 
reduce office work loads. I look forward to working 
with the citizenry of Chelmsford in the years ahead. 

Sincerely, 

Charles F. Mansfield 
Finance Director 



TOWN ACCOUNTANTS OFFICE 

Department Members: 

Bernard W. Meyler, Jr., CPA, Town Accountant 
Mary Villare, Assistant Town Accountant 
Renee Messer, Payroll Coordinator 
Patricia Tucker, Principal Clerk 
Christine Dowd, Senior Clerk 

In FY1992 Midge McCormack retired from our 
office after 17 years of dedicated service. Renee 
Messer replaced Midge and has been a welcomed 
addition to our staff. 

The responsibility of Payroll has been shifted from 
the Treasurer's Office to the Accounting Office. 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips, M.A.A., Chairman 

Bruce A. Symmes, C.M.A., R.M.A., M.A.A. 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. 

Assistant to the Assessors 

Nancy L. Maher 

Principal Clerks 

Marie Ronan Elaine McBride 

Senior Clerk 

Elaine Myers 

The Assessors Office had its triennial recertifica- 
tion of values for Fiscal Year 1992. Our values 
decreased in general, however our tax rate increased. 
The increase was due to the override for the schools 
and the ongoing debt and interest of the sewer pro- 
gram. The tax rate for FY1992 was $14.90 for residen- 
tial and $15.26 for commercial, industrial and per- 
sonal property. 

Ruth K. Delaney an assessor since 1976 retired 
from the Assessors Office. Ruth will be sorely missed 
and we wish her much happiness. Taking Ruth's posi- 
tion is Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. We all are looking for- 
ward to working with Mr. Shanahan. 

This office is the first to go on the network com- 
puter system and we are looking forward to learning 
all about it. 



DATA PROCESSING 

With the Data Processing Department just form- 
ing as of September, 1992 there have been some 
changes to the current system. Daily operational soft- 
ware has been installed for use by all departments. 
Thirty-two (32) network connections were installed 
and a total of twenty-one (21) are successfully up and 
running. Police and Fire Departments are in the tran- 
sition stage of moving to IBM/Novell compatible 
machines. The new Accounting/Town System is well 
under way. 

FY94 goals include the upgrade of the current sys- 
tems software, to include more user access into the 
Novell system. Dial-in transmissions with Police and 
Fire for Network, Accounting system. To make sure 
the remaining 1 1 network connections are successfully 
installed and running. All users trained on the various 
applications to work efficiently in their daily activities. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Diane Phillips, M.A.A. 

Bruce Symmes, CM. A., R.M.A. 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. 



83 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Fire Department has lived with the present 
economy again in 1992 with very few major losses. 
Substantial progress and gains in credibility have been 
accomplished through the hard work of our Fire Pre- 
vention Bureau and the entire staff completing many 
hours of inservice inspections. We have continued to 
expand our knowledge and training to stay in line 
with today's ever changing policies on infectious dis- 
eases and high combustible materials that are forever 
evident in this day and age. 

We were saddened by the job related deaths of 
two firefighters in 1992. Firefighter Francis "Bud" 
Conlin, a thirty-two year veteran and Firefighter 
David Gelineau, a fifteen year veteran passed away 
and will be sadly missed by brother firefighters, fam- 
ily and friends. Firefighter James Cutter retired after 
27 years of service to the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Fire Department was able to hire back all of 
the layed off personnel. This was accomplished 
through a union contract allowing different manning 
policies and replacing retirees. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the 
Board of Selectmen and all other offices for their help 
and cooperation shown to the Fire Department this 
past year. The main goals for the coming year are 
civilian dispatchers and hopefully the reopening of 
the West Fire Station. I would also like to express my 
appreciation to my fellow members of the Chelmsford 
Fire Department, my office staff and our mechanics 
for their cooperation and again for continuing to 
uphold the high standards of service and professional- 
ism to the townspeople of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert L. Hughes 

Fire Chie 



DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 

Fire Chief 

Robert L. Hughes 

Deputy Chiefs 

James A. Sousa 
Charles S. Galloway 

Captains 

James M. Spinney Charles A. Schramm 

James P. Boermeester Michael F. Curran 

Wm. Michael Burke 



Walter F. Adley 
Robert Bennett 
William F. Cady 
David Campbell 
William Campbell 
John Carroll 
Anthony Cincevich 
David Clancy 
Kevin Clarke 
Mark F. Conlin 
James F. Curran 
William Curran 
William Dalton 
John DePalma 
Bruce Donovan 
Donald Drew 
James Durkin 
James Flaherty 
Jesse Foster 
Ernest Frobese 
Terrance Goode 
Richard Grenon 
David Hadley 
William Hadley 
Paul D. Hayes 



Firefighters 



Paul D. Henderson 

Henry A. Houle 

William Jamer 

Peter Johnson 

Dennis Keohane 

William P. Keohane 

Raymond Kydd 

Emil Magiera 

Leo Martin 

Michael McTeague 

Leslie Merrill 

Richard Miller 

Edward Nolet 

Richard P. O'Neil 

Daniel T. Reid 

James F. Reid 

John E. Reid 

Michael D. Ridlon 

Arthur Rivard 

John Robinson 

Joseph Spinazola 

Brian Stanton 

John D. Ubele 

Dennis Vargeletis 

Peter T. Wetherbee 



Principal Clerk 

Martha A. DeSaulnier 

Senior Clerk 

Patricia Britton 



Mechanics 

James Keeley 
Anthony Vaccaro 



84 



CHELMSFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT CALLS - 1992 





A 


B 


M 


MA 


I 


O 


S 


F 


Total 


January 


5 


6 


69 


1 


59 


6 


89 


11 


246 


February 


7 


1 


67 


1 


47 


5 


104 


5 


237 


March 


3 


5 


50 


2 


59 


11 


125 


5 


260 


April 


5 


1 


69 


1 


87 


22 


86 


7 


278 


May 


4 


2 


61 


3 


69 


19 


63 


1 


222 


June 


5 


2 


55 


2 


77 


9 


73 


4 


227 


July 


8 


2 


74 


2 


56 


6 


51 


3 


202 


August 


4 


3 


81 


2 


68 


7 


61 


4 


230 


September 


7 


7 


53 





52 


1 


56 


11 


187 


October 


5 


4 


85 


1 


67 


1 


96 


7 


266 


November 


3 


3 


79 


1 


52 


6 


92 


10 


246 


December 


7 


3 


78 


3 


62 


6 


87 


8 


254 


Total Calls 


63 


39 


821 


19 


755 


99 


983 


76 


2855 



85 



NASHOBA VALLEY 
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Serving the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Little- 
ton, Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend and Westford. 

DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Howard Burns, Chairman 

Irene Machemer, Vice Chairman 

Charlotte Scott, Secretary 

Thomas Carey 

Robert Union 

Charla Boles 

Donald Reeves 

Stratos Dukakis 

Augustine Kish 

Karen Johnson 

Joan O'Brien 

Jerilyn Bozicas 



ALTERNATES 



Harvey Atkins, Jr. 
Stephen Dunbar 
L. Peter Noddin 
Jordan Waugh 
Samuel Poulten 
Alfred Buckley 



Pepperell 

Townsend 

Westford 

Chelmsford 

Westford 

Groton 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Littleton 

Shirley 

Westford 

Pepperell 



Littleton 

Townsend 

Shirley 

Groton 

Chelmsford 

Pepperell 



ADMINISTRATION 

Bernholdt Nystrom Superintendent-Director 

David McLaughlin Assistant Director/Principal 

SUPERVISION 

Victor Kiloski Academic Coordinator 

Paul Royte Guidance Director 

Paula Page Special Education Coordinator 



BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 



Ralph Dumas 



Accounting Manager 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School's enroll- 
ment, as of October 1, 1992, is as follows: 



Chelmsford 

Groton 

Littleton 

Pepperell 

Shirley 

Townsend 

Westford 

Tuitioned 

Total 



100 
31 
23 
85 
52 
46 
62 
53 

452 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accred- 
ited by the New England Association of Schools and 



Colleges, Inc. and provides its students with on-the- 
job-training, saleable skills, a co-op program, a high 
school diploma, a trade certificate, an opportunity for 
further education at a college of their choice and job 
placement. 

Each year, qualified seniors may elect to take 
advantage of our Co-op Training Program which 
allows senior students to work in industry during 
their shop weeks and receive valuable training in their 
chosen fields as well as a salary. 

The following programs are offered at Nashoba 
Technical High School: 

Technical Programs 



Auto Body 

Automotive 

Carpentry 

Culinary Arts and Baking 

Data Processing 

Drafting 

Electrical 



Horticulture/Landscaping 

Machine 

Medical Occupations 

Metal Fabrication 

Painting and Decorating 

Plumbing and Heating 

Printing 



Electronics Building & Grounds (Special Education) 

Academic Programs 

English Geometry 

Social Studies Trigonometry 

U.S. History Advanced Mathematics 

Consumer Education Biology 

General Mathematics Physics 

Algebra Chemistry 

How to Start Your Own Business 

In addition to the technical and academic pro- 
grams, a full Inter-Scholastic Athletic Program is 
offered to the students. 

ADULT EDUCATION 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult 
Education Program is open to anyone of high school 
age or over. Residents from all communities are wel- 
come to participate in the many diversified courses 
which are offered during both the fall and spring 
semesters. This year 531 students enrolled in our 
Adult Education Program during the fall semester. 

ADULT DAY CLASSES 

This year, to accommodate District citizens who 
are unemployed or underemployed, the Nashoba 
Tech accepts adults into some of the technical pro- 
grams where seats are available. This program helps 
unemployed or underemployed attain the skills 
needed to find a new position or become better quali- 
fied in their present positions, thereby offering the 
underemployed a chance at promotions. 



86 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information 
and review the Annual Report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year 1992. 

At the present time, the department is made up 
of 47 permanent officers. 

Chief of Police 

Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Chief 

James C. Greska 

Captains 

Armand J. Caron John J. Mack Phillip N. Molleur 



Matrons 



Steven Burns 
Paul E. Cooper 
T. Ronald Gamache 



Sergeants 

Raymond C. McCusker 

James F. Murphy 

John O. Walsh 



Department Criminal Prosecutor 
Lowell District Court 

Sergeant Robert M. Burns 

Criminal Bureau Sergeant 

William R. McAllister 



James T. Finnegan 
Brian Mullen 



Inspectors 

Peter C. McGeown 
Timothy F. O'Connor 
Eugene Walsh 



Drug/ Alcohol Control Unit Sergeant 

Francis X. Roark 



Jared S. Finnegan 



Inspectors 



Roland E. Linstad 



Community Services & Safety Officer 

Patrick W. Daley 

Crime Prevention Officer 

E. Michael Rooney 



Richard A. Adams 
Alan N. Cote 
Thomas J. Daly, Jr. 
Bruce A. Darwin 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
Gail F. Hunter 
Francis P. Kelly 
Martin Krikorian 
Russell H. Linstad 
David F. MacKenzie, 
John C. McGeown 
Debra J. Metcalf 



Patrolmen 

Thomas A. Niemaszyk 

David A. O'Brien 

John E. Redican 

Paul E. Richardson 

Chandler J. Robinson 

Michael M. Stott 

William S. Strobel 

Francis P. Teehan 

Robert J. Trudel 

Scott R. Ubele 

Jr. William R. Walsh 

Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 



Faith Allen 
Mary Jo Fitton 



Cynthia Katsikas 
Carol Ann Tabor 



Principal Clerks 

Marie K. DiRocco Mary Jane Grant 

Senior Clerks 

Donna A. Fox Elizabeth A. Greenhalgh 

Civilian Dispatchers 

Barbara J. Ducharme Milton H. Kinney, Jr. 

Frederick F. Flynn, Jr. Frank C. Lane 



RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO TOWN 

1991 

Photocopying Machine $ 4,025.00 

Firearms Permits 2,164.00 

Bicycle Registrations 9.00 

Firearms Identification Cards 356 . 00 

Court Fines 132,362.50 

Registry of Motor Vehicles N/A 

Photographs 404.00 

PoUce Details-Service Charge 59,904.00 

False Alarm Fees 7,425.00 

Parking Fines 7,920.00 

Restitution 910.00 

Total Receipts Returned to Town $215,479.50 

ARRESTS 

1991 

Crimes Against Persons 74 

Crimes Against Property 174 

Crimes Against Public Order 206 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 
1991 

Fines 45 

Placed on Probation 33 

Suspended Sentence/Placed on File 20 

Placed on File 10 

Not Guilty Finding 3 

Dismissed with Probable Cause 25 

Court Costs & Continued Without Finding 3 

Committed to Youth Services Board 7 

Committed to M.C.I. Cedar Junction 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 2 

Committed to House of Correction, Billerica ....37 

Turned Over to Other Courts/Police Depts 161 

Cases Pending & Continued in Court 97 

Placed in Alcohol Safety Program (ASAP) 27 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 
1991 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 20,724 

Summons Served 720 

Licenses Suspended/Revoked 1,214 

Accidents Reported 18,183 

Fatal Accidents 4 

Personal Injury Accidents 459 



1992 

$ 3,107.00 

3,044.00 

4.50 

366.00 

41,186.00 

91,903.30 

492.00 

32,908.41 

5,875.00 

7,730.00 

1,265.00 

$187,881.21 



1992 

62 
202 
183 



1992 

45 

24 

26 

6 

10 

16 

6 

3 

2 



56 

209 

76 

23 



1992 

18,633 

553 

1,176 

1,153 

2 

302 



87 



Mileage of Cruisers 448,892 426,447 

Station Lockups 454 502 

Citations Issued 2,039 2,365 

Parking Violations Issued 310 417 

Doors/Windows Found Open 139 68 

Protective Custody 79 53 

Restraining Orders Served 98 84 

False Alarms Responded to by Cruisers 1,111 1,119 

Sergeant William R. McAllister, head of the Crim- 
inal Investigation Bureau and a veteran of more than 
30 years of distinguished service to the Town, retired 
from the Department on December 30, 1992. 

In an effort to maximize Department emergency 
medical response, all patrol vehicles have been 
equipped with life-saving oxygen tanks. All Police 
Officers have been thoroughly trained in the usage of 
this emergency equipment. 

All regular patrol vehicles have had Beretta 12 
Gauge Automatic Shotguns mounted in the front seat 
area, readily accessible to Officers in emergency situa- 
tions. 

As part of our program to rebuild our personnel 
compliment at no additional expense to the Town, 
three Officers, whose salaries are being drawn from 
monies previously appropriated from overtime, have 
been permanently appointed to this Department. 

The efforts of this Department serve to generate 
total receipts of $187,881.21 which reverted back to 
the general fund of the Town. 

I would like to express my sincerest appreciation 
to the Town Manager, Board of Selectmen and all 
town officials, departments and committees for the 
excellent cooperation given to the Police Department 
and also congratulate both sworn and non-sworn per- 
sonnel of this department for once again, maintaining 
their high performance standards. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Chief Raymond P. McKeon 

AUXILIARY POLICE REPORT 

This past year the Auxiliary Officers assisted the 
regular Police Department at numerous events such as 
Memorial Day Parade, John Carson Road Race, Flag 
Day Ceremonies, Chelmsford High School Graduation 
exercises, July 3rd and 4th Festivities, Veteran's Day 
Celebration, Chelmsford's Arts Fair, Halloween secu- 
rity for schools, Thanksgiving Football Field security 
and the Christmas Holiday Prelude on the Common. 
The Officers of the Auxiliary donated a total of 
11,230 man hours to the town performing their 
duties. 



Operation Property Check was in operation on 
230 nights. The statistics were: vacant house checks 
3,500; school checks 12,600; town property checks 
17,350, for a total of 33,400. It is with pride and great 
pleasure that I report no significant damage to town 
property or the schools. The Auxiliary Unit continues 
to sponsor and advise the Law Enforcement Explorer 
Scout Post #370. Officers of the Auxiliary train these 
young men and women in traffic control, search tech- 
niques, firearm safety as well as other law enforce- 
ment activities. If it wasn't for the Scouts' dedication 
and help, some events would not have been as suc- 
cessful as they were. I would like to thank the mem- 
bers of the Auxiliary, the Scouts and their families for 
donating so much of their time. You are truly an asset 
to the Town of Chelmsford. It is well known that 
without such volunteer assistance such as the Auxil- 
iary Police Unit, many events could not be held. 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and 
the Town Manager for their support, the Chief and 
Deputy Chief, the Superior Officers and Patrol Offi- 
cers of the Police Department for all their assistance 
and support over the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sergeant Raymond G. McCusker 

Auxiliary Roster 

Director-Sgt. Raymond G. McKusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 



Will Amundson 
John Bell 
Charles Emerson 
Joseph Eriksen 
Eric Gordon 
Richard Hallion 
David Irvine 
David Leo 
Peter LoPilato 
Steve Manning 
Erik Merrill 
Robert Murphy 



John Oczkowski 

Rob Outridge 

Bradford Poole 

Ralph Roscoe 

Kevin Ross 

Richard Smith 

Colin Spence 

Scott Tansino 

Craig Walsh 

David Walsh 

Gary White 



BUDGET OUTLAYS 

18 Portable Radios (Approx. $1,000 ea) $18,000.00 

1 Fuming Tank for Fingerprints 600.00 

1 35-Milimeter Camrea 1,000.00 

1 Infant Manekin (CPR) 1,000.00 

1 Pair Binoculars ( Night Vision ) 1 , 400 . 00 

TOTAL $22,000.00 



88 



DEPARTMENT OF 
PUBLIC WORKS 

Director 

James Pearson, P.E., Town Engineer 

Highway Division 

John Long, Superintendent 



Pine Hill Road 
Overlook Drive 
Checkerberry Lane 
Dunstable Road 
Mission Road 



(Hunt to Chestnut Hill) 

entire 

entire 

(Marquerite to Swain) 

(Dunstable to town line) 



Roy Costa, Foreman 
Marie Burns, Office 
Kenneth Burroughs, Laborer 
James Crotty, Driver 
Leslie Dukeshire, Laborer 
Lawrence Ferreira, Operator 
Richard Jenson, Mech. 
Arthur Newcomb, Operator 
Joseph Eriksen, Driver 



Bob Loyd, Foreman 

Gary Beaulieu, Operator 

John Cronin, Driver 

Robert Dearborn, Driver 

John Ferreira, Lead Mech. 

Dennis Greenwood, Operator 

Walter McLaughlin, Operator 

Raymond Mayberry, Driver 

Audie Boudreau, Driver 



Sewer Division 

James Casparro, Insp. Joseph Witts, Mechanic 

Evelyn Newman, Dept. Ass't. Jacqueline Sheehy, Pr. Clerk 
Gail Loiselle, Clerk Michael Vosnakis, Technician 

Parks Division 

Edward Jamros, Groundskeeper 

Engineering Division 

Anthony Ma, Asst. Town Engineer 

Public Bldgs. Division 

Robert Deletetsky, Supt. Patrick Murtagh, Head Cust. 

Gerald Johnson, Cust. 

Engineering Division 

The Engineering Division this year spent much 
time assisting other departments with matters relating 
to drainage, layouts, trees, old plans, proposed plans, 
tax maps, etc. Five projects were submitted on behalf 
of the Town to the Conservation Commission. Among 
these were the clearing of all major culverts in order 
to minimize local flooding. The engineers also pro- 
vided the plans and details for the refurbishing of the 
Hart Pond dam spillway in compliance with the direc- 
tives of the State's Department of Environmental 
Management. 

Highway Division 

The Highway Division maintains and improves all 
the streets, culverts, catch basins and manholes, 
street signs, traffic signs and traffic signals for approx- 
imately 200 miles of roadway. 

Streets Resurfaced 

Brick Kiln Road portions 

Berkeley Drive entire 



Chestnut Hill Road from Pine Hill to Galloway 
Road was reconstructed this summer. This portion of 
the road had been in poor condition due to improper 
road foundation. A major culvert was replaced and all 
boulders and base materials were removed. Gravel 
was placed and compacted and finally the roadway 
was paved. 

The division lost two of our more experienced 
and dedicated employees to retirement. We wish 
Equipment Operator Jim Soucier and Driver-Laborer 
Ernie Howland a happy and healthy retirement. 

The division welcomed new employees, Ray May- 
berry, Joe Eriksen and Audie Boudreau. The three 
new employees were put right to work on the refur- 
bishing of the Hart Pond spillway. This included the 
uncovering and replacement of the wooden planks 
that serve as the outlet controls. Everyone involved in 
this project did an excellent job under most severe 
conditions. 

December 12 saw a blizzard hit the area which 
dumped about 18 inches of snow on the Town. A 
state of emergency was declared while the highway 
crew scraped and sanded the roads for safe travel. 
The highway crew and the hired help did an out- 
standing job. It had been about 14 years since a storm 
of that magnitude had occurred. 

Parks Division 

Once again Groundskeeper Ed Jamros managed 
to keep ahead of schedule in maintaining the many 
"green areas" owned by the Town. During the wet, 
cool summer season when the grass growth never 
slowed down, Ed was assisted by Eric Newman who 
was hired as a summer employee. 

Special thanks to the following "Adopt-a-Park" 
volunteers for their assistance: Dick Codling, Dick 
Burkinshaw, Keigh Schuster, Chelmsford Rotary, Val- 
ley Green Landscaping, Chelmsford Garden Club, 
Kevin Stott Landscaping, David O'Brien, Dun-Rite 
Landscaping, Laughton Nurseries and Community 
Tree Co. 

Special projects started this year included the 
reconstruction of the bathroom facilities at the Varney 
Field recreation building. 



89 



Public Buildings 

The Buildings Division staff maintain the Town 
Offices, Old Town Hall and the Police Station. Along 
with being the first ones in the building in the morn- 
ing, they are also the last to leave and assure that the 
buildings are secured. In addition to normal custodial 
duties, minor maintenance tasks, such as fixing walls, 
mounting directory signs, repainting rooms and clean- 
ing carpets are undertaken. 

The buildings were also kept open during Decem- 
ber's blizzard as the control center for the Civil 
Defense crew during the state of emergency. This task 
required long hours of snow clearing by the staff. 

Sewer Division 

The Sewer Division continues to expand its role 
and responsibilities as the new sewer construction 
expands into different areas of Town. The office staff 
keeps extremely busy preparing and processing the 
sewer betterment assessments, the Sewer Commission 
agendas, meeting minutes, contracts and general cor- 
respondence. Sewer User bills are another ever-chang- 
ing and challenging task that is accomplished in the 
office. On-line billing customers have increased 
approximately 25% over the past year. Thanks go to 
the water districts for their cooperation with water 
meter readings and backflow prevention device test- 
ing. 

The Sewer Division added a maintenance techni- 
cian to assist with the operation of our eight sewer 
pumping stations. Mike Vosnakis joined our staff in 
December. His assistance will be critical as we soon 
expand to thirteen pumping stations. 

Special thanks go to the Sewer Commission for 
their cooperation throughout the year. 

Finally, I would like to thank all the employees of 
the Department of Public Works who, when asked, or 
when conditions dictate, will work together outside of 
their own particular job or expertise to solve a prob- 
lem or respond to any emergency situation for the 
good of the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James E. Pearson, P.E. 
Director of Public Works 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Members 

Harold Organ, Jr. 
Eileen M. Duffy 
Gustave H. Fallgren 
Daniel Burke 
Robert L. Kydd 
Ronald Pare, Alternate 
Leonard Richards, Alternate 
Karen Wharton, Alternate 

1992 was another quiet year for the Board of 
Appeals. We received fewer applications for hearings 
due to the depressed economy. 

The members of the board regret the resignation 
of long-time member Dan Burke. Dan was a diligent, 
conscientious member who during his many years as 
Chairman guided us through difficult decisions. His 
thorough knowledge of the By-Laws and Massachu- 
setts General Laws 40A and 40B facilitated the deci- 
sion process. He will be sorely missed. 

Ron Pare, a prior alternate replaced Dan as a 
member of the Board. 

It has been a pleasure serving as Chairman of the 
board and I appreciate the help of the Board of 
Selectmen, Board of Health, Sign Advisory, Conserva- 
tion Commission and Planning Board for their coop- 
eration during 1992. 

Hearing Statistics: 



Total 


Granted 


Denied 


Variances . 39 


32 


7 


Special Permits 23 


22 


1 


Comprehensive Permits 2 


2 





Total 



64 



56 



8 



Respectfully submitted, 
Robert L. Kydd, Chairman 



OFFICE OF THE DOG OFFICER 

Report of the Dog Officer for 1992. 

Citizen complaints answered 1241 

Dogs picked up and taken to pound 90 

Violation citations issued 10 

Value of citation fines $375.00 

Funds turned into town for boarding 

and other fees collected $755.00 

Dead animals picked up from streets 324 

Stray dogs disposed of 40 

Dogs returned to owners 50 

Miles traveled 12,565 

1992 dogs licensed 2,794 



90 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and resi- 
dents of the Town of Chelmsford, I am submitting 
the annual report of activities of this department as 
Veterans' Agent and Investigator for the year 1992. 

Veterans' Benefits is a state mandated organiza- 
tion duly authorized under Chapter 115, MGL Section 
1 through 5. Two valued services are provided. One 
pertains to assistance with Federal benefits under the 
Veterans' Administration, the other to financially aid 
and give assistance to qualified veterans and their 
dependents under Veterans' Benefits. 

The Cash and Material Grant of $76,000 from the 
Town of Chelmsford is reimbursed 75% by the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. On the State level my 
case load varies between 20 and 28 families. On the 
Federal level, we had 51 cases, 26 active. Veterans' 
Administration expenditures for the Town were 
$2,614,212. 

Presently I serve as Sergeant at Arms in the Mid- 
dlesex County Veterans' Agents Association, and I 
serve as a board member of the recently created 
Chelmsford Food Pantry. 

One major goal for 1993 is to computerize the 
Veterans' Office. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Kevin Cody, Veterans' Agent 



nutritious lunches to elderly shut-ins five 
times a week 

4) Respite Care provides needed assistance to 20 
caregiving families each week with over 225 
units of service. 

5) Through our Friendly Visitor Program and 
Outreach Worker we are able to visit over 50 
homebound elders each week 

6) Our new Adult Care Program provides essen- 
tial and caring service for 14 needy older citi- 
zens three days a week 

7) Approximately 550 trips are provided each 
month through the use of our COA Mini-Bus 
- with medical needs the first priority 

8) Our relationship with the school system is 
excellent, and we work in partnership to pro- 
vide numerous Intergenerational Programs 

9) Our staff consists of: 



Position 


#of Hours 


Funding Source 


1. Director 


37.5+ 


Town 


2. Sr. Clerk 


27.5 


Town 


3. Day Care Coordinator 


28 


Program Income 


4. Respite Care Director 


25 


Chelm. (75%1/Westford (25%) 


5. Bus Driver 


40 


Town/LRTA 


6. Friendly Visitor Coord. 


7 


Title III Grant 


7. Meals on Wheels Coord. 


20 


Formula Grant 


8. Outreach Worker 


20 


"Friends' 


9. Custodians (3) 


20 


"Friends' 


10. Senior Aides (4) 


20 


Federal 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Director Martin J. Walsh 

President Robert Clough 

Vice President Wilbur Davis 

Clerk Maureen Evans 

Rose Arakelian Robert Monaco 

Martin Boermeester Charles Pechulis 

Mary Conti Gene Raby 

Lois Manty Eleanore Woodward 

FACTS ABOUT YOUR SENIOR CENTER: 

1) Between 1500 and 2000 people pass through 
our doors each week 

2) Our Congregate Lunch Program averages 
close to 200 people each day 

3) Our Meals on Wheels Program provides 90 



10) Operational Costs: The approximate cost for the 
town to operate the Dept. of Elder Affairs is 
$120,000. 

During FY92 the Friends of the Senior Center, Inc., 
expended $118,941.31 for the overall operation of the Cen- 
ter. For example(s): 



Overhead Building Maintenance 

Equipment 

Outreach Program 



$27,000.00 
12,567.00 
10,000.00 



This is clear evidence that the seniors of this town are 
committed through time, effort and money to make the 
Chelmsford Senior Center one of the finest in this Com- 
monwealth. 

FUTURE GOALS: 

Goal #1: Fulfill the goals and objectives of the Senior 
Tax Rebate Program which will enable fifty 



91 



(50) Chelmsford residents with the opportu- 
nity to receive a $500 rebate off their property 
taxes and the town will receive five thousand 
(5,000) hours of valuable experience and 
growth. 

Goal #2: Expand our Social Day Care Program to four 
days of operation so that we reach even more 
residents. This program adds an important 
and compassionate service to our Senior Cen- 
ter. 

Goal #3: Work with the School Dept. to develop and 
improve Intergenerational Programming. Get 
more seniors actively involved in: career coun- 
seling, oral history classes and tutorial assis- 
tance. 

Goal #4: Establish a Telephone Reassurance Program 
for elderly shut-ins. Through the use of Title 
III (Federal), hire a coordinator to oversee and 
administrate this elderly phone service, which 
is a natural extension of our present Friendly 
Visitor Program. The objective is to reach iso- 
lated shut-ins. 

Goal #5: Expand our Elderly Home Repair Service. Pro- 
vide minor repair for elderly residents. At pre- 
sent we help one elderly person per week, and 
I would like to provide assistance for 5 per 
week. This program, though small, has been 
greatly appreciated by those in need. 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 
Steve Chinetti James K. Gifford 

Charles Marderosian 

The Celebrations Committee this past year was 
most active, preparing and coordinating the 1992 
Annual Fourth of July Celebration. Many thanks to 
the Chelmsford Lodge of Elks No. 2310 for their 
organizing and funding the Annual parade, the 
Chelmsford Lions Club for organizing and funding 
the Annual Country Fair, Chelmsford Art Society for 
the Arts Festival Fair, Chelmsford Community Band, 
Alpine Squares Dancing Club of Chelmsford and all 
various volunteers from organizations in Chelmsford 
who participated to make the 25th Annual Celebra- 
tion a huge success. 

Special thanks to the many volunteer hours pro- 
vided by the members of the Chelmsford Auxiliary 
Police and their Explorers Troop. 

We thank the efforts of the Public Works & Parks, 



Fire and Police Departments and their personnel for 
their assistance during the days of the Celebration. 

The Town Celebrations Committee is now in the 
process of planning for the 1993 Annual Fourth of 
July Celebration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 

Chairman 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 

The Chelmsford Commission on Disabilities (for- 
merly the Chelmsford Commission on Handicapped 
Affairs) is a seven member board. In 1992 those mem- 
bers are Chairman Ralph Hickey, Vice Chairman 
Bruce Knowles, Treasurer Paul Logan, and Secretary 
Cathy Favreau. Other members are Terry Eldridge, 
Carol Miller, and Mary St. Hilaire. 

In 1992 the Commission sponsored a Community 
Access Training seminar, a regional disability commis- 
sion meeting, and an Americans with Disabilities Act 
seminar. In addition, the Commission found housing 
for three disabled persons, updated their bylaws, cre- 
ated and distributed a resource brochure, and is 
working on passing legislation to increase the town's 
handicap parking fine. 

The Commission was also actively involved in 
insuring that all new construction of public places as 
well as all recently remodeled businesses comply with 
the State's Architectural Access laws. The Commis- 
sion began 1992 with 8 outstanding access com- 
plaints. In addition, 11 new access complaints were 
logged in 1992. Of these 19 complaints, 7 were 
resolved, 4 had partial improvement, and 8 remain 
unresolved. The average duration for complaint reso- 
lution was 6 months. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Members 

Susan E. Carter, Chairman 
Christopher Garrahan, Clerk 
Dr. John Droescher 
W. Robert Greenwood 
David J. McLachlan 
Lynn LeMaire 
Cheryl Deschaise 



Term Expires 

1993 
1994 
1993 
1994 
1995 
1995 
1995 



Marjorie Hennessy, Secretary (retiring jan, 1993) 

The Conservation Commission's primary purpose 
is to administer the General Wetlands By-law of the 
Town and the Wetlands Protection Act of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. These By-laws control 
activities deemed to have significant effect upon the 



92 



Wetlands, which in turn influence public and private 
water supplies, flood control, water pollution, fish- 
eries and wildlife. 

1992 brought a year of change to the Commis- 
sion. Jim McBride and Karen Flynn both requested 
not to be reappointed to the Commission. In addi- 
tion, the Town of Chelmsford's beaver problems 
became the focus of public debate as to the long term 
solution for those homeowners suffering from flood- 
ing and beaver damage. 

The Commission held two public informational 
meetings with the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife in 
attendance. As a result of those meetings 17 problem 
sites were evaluated and "dam break" permits were 
issued for some. Two "beaver pipes" have been 
installed in Town. 

The Commission has also begun to focus on the 
maintenance of the six reservations under the Com- 
mission's control. All six reservations were walked 
and the Commission is focusing on one to two reser- 
vations a year for overhauls, such as new signs, mark- 
ing trails and general cleanup. 

The Commission voted to dedicate the Crooked 
Spring Reservation to Margaret Mills in June, 1993. 
Mrs. Mills was one of the early Commission members 
and was instrumental in obtaining funding to pur- 
chase Conservation Lands. 

The Commission meets regularly on the first and 
third Tuesdays of the month, with Site Walks on the 
Saturday before or after meetings. In 1992 32 Public 
Hearings were held in which 13 Orders of Conditions 
were issued instructing the applicant on how to 
undertake work within 100 feet of Wetlands in order 
to minimize any possible negative effect on the Wet- 
lands. In addition, another 23 Public Hearings were 
held for Determination of Applicability to the Wet- 
lands By-laws. Eighteen negative determinations were 
issued indicating that the work planned had no 
impact on the Wetlands and five positive determina- 
tions were indicating that Wetlands By-laws would 
apply. 

As the Town continues to grow and environmen- 
tal issues take on greater importance in how they 
impact the quality of life in our community, citizen 
involvement in advising the Commission when dam- 
age to the Wetlands starts to occur will assist the 
Commission in protecting the assets of the Wetlands. 
We also wish to thank those individuals who have 
worked with the Commission early in their develop- 
ment plans so that proper planning and execution of 
development can occur. 

After 12 and 8 years on the Commission respec- 
tively, Jim McBride and Karen Flynn did not seek 
reappointment. The Commission wishes to thank Jim 



and Karen for their dedication and hard work. 



CHELMSFORD CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Members 

Joyce D. McKenzie, Chairperson 
Pat Fitzpatrick, Vice Chairperson 
Jeff Brem, Treasurer 
Margrit Mason, Secretary 
Karen Leonard 
Edie Copenhaver 
Jean McCaffery 
Kit Harbison 
Elaine Consalvo 

Meetings: 1st Monday of the month 

Twice a month during Arts Lottery reviews 

The principal function of the Chelmsford Cultural 
Council is to administer funds allocated to the Town 
of Chelmsford by the Mass. Cultural Council. Funds 
are generated from lottery monies. Grant applications 
are available to non-profit cultural organizations for 
projects benefiting the Chelmsford community. 

In 1992, 12 grant proposals were either partially 
or fully funded, ranging from concerts, theatre pro- 
ductions and a multi-cultural dance program to the 
highly successful community Arts Fair. In addition, 
the Chelmsford school system benefited from 13 
P.A.S.S. (Performing Arts Students' Series) grants. Ini- 
tiated in Nov. 1986, this program provides funds for 
school-aged children (K-12) to attend performing arts 
events. 

The Council is involved with the functioning of 
the Old Town Hall Cultural Center. Town-based orga- 
nizations are encouraged to use the hall for special 
events or for regular rehearsals and meetings. 

Accomplishments this year include: The dedica- 
tion of the sound system at the Old Town Hall Cul- 
tural Center; attendance at the Mass. Cultural Coun- 
cil workshop for revising new State guidelines; culmi- 
nation of 18 mos. planning the community Arts Fair 
held on Oct. 3rd on the Common. The Fair show- 
cased local arts' groups in a collaboration with civic, 
historical and school-based organizations to provide 
the community with a clearer understanding of local 
cultural efforts. The resignations of Sandra Stewich 
and Deborah Sady were regretfully accepted. 

New member, Kit Harbison, was welcomed. 

Future projects include: Community Input meet- 
ing, Spring 1993; Performing Arts Series and Competi- 
tion 1993-94. 



93 



OFFICE OF 
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 

John Abbott George R. Dixon 

Depty. Charles S. Galloway 

The Chelmsford Emergency Management Agency 
(Civil Defense) has once again very active this past 
year, with a State of Emergency being declared by 
Town, State and Federal Governments, due to the 
Winter Storm of '92 on December 12, 1992, many 
volunteer hours were spent by CEMA personnel at 
the Emergency Operating Center at the Town Offices 
during the three days of heavy storm storms. Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Mass. 
Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) will be 
conduting surveys of the various damages and over- 
time costs during the Town State of Emergency to be 
eligivle for Federal and State Funds, the CEMA vol- 
unteers meet the 2nd Thursday of each month, 
preparing various reports for Federal and State Emer- 
gency Agencies. The Emergency Coordinator and 
members have spent many volunteer hours this past 
year at seminars of Natural Disasters and Hazardous 
Materials sponsored by FEMA and MEMA Agencies. 
The CEMA personnel wish to thank the Town Man- 
ager the Board of Selectmen, all Town Department 
Heads and their personnel for the outstanding coop- 
eration received during our most trying year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 

Emergency Coordinator 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Members: Martha Sanders, Chairman 

John Goodwin 

Torrie Gullion 

Jeff Stallard 
Clerk: Katherine Leslie 

Meetings: Third Wednesday of each month at the 
1802 Schoolhouse except November through March at 
the Town Hall. The Commission is made up of seven 
appointed members. 

During the past year the Historical Commission 
delivered twelve house signs displaying the original 
owner/builder and the approximate year of construc- 
tion. The concentration of effort by the Commission 
has been in the North Chelmsford Vinal Square area 



for the inventories of historic properties that are 
required by the Massachusetts Historical Commission 
and also the sign program. Many more properties in 
North Chelmsford and in Chelmsford Center are 
scheduled for house signs. 

The Commission is also preparing an application 
for the National Register of Historic Places for the 
Stoney Brook railroad bridge in North Chelmsford off 
Middlesex Street. This stone arch bridge is the only 
remaining bridge of its design from the 1850's. 

The Commission is currently seeking new mem- 
bers interested in researching the architecture of local 
construction and who are interested in preserving and 
protecting the heritage of the Town of Chelmsford. 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



Members: 



Alternates: 



Clerk: 



Charles Buuck, Chairman 
Stephen Stowell, Vice Chairman 
Harold Linnerud 
Harold Davis 
Robert LaPorte 

Paul Canniff 
Bruce Foucar 

Mary Caffelle 



The H.D.C. functions as a regularoty commission 
for the benefit of the town. A small area of the 
town's center section is under the H.D.C. 's authority. 
Our objective is to provide a reasonably expedient 
application and review process relative to physical 
modifications to the residences and businesses within 
the district. Regular meetings are held on the third 
Monday of each month at the 1802 Schoolhouse. 

During the past year, the H.D.C. has accepted 16 
applications for review. Public hearings were deemed 
necessary for 4 of these applications. It was deter- 
mined that the remaining 12 had minimal effect with 
regard to preservation within the District. These 16 
applications resulted in issuance of 13 Certificates of 
Appropriateness and 3 Certificates of Non-Applicabil- 
ity. No applications were denied in 1992. Major 
accomplishments include substantial and appropriate 
completion of the Sargent property and the Krasnecki 
property. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles T. Buuck 
Chairman 



94 



HOLIDAY DECORATING 
COMMITTEE 

Committee Members 

Donna A. Johnson, Chairman Carolee Hill 

Ellen Donovan, Treasurer Jacqueline Wunschel 

Linda Emerson Carrie Bacon 

Jean Kydd Marie Massota 

Dawn Siphol Dennis Ready 

Patricia Saber 

Departmental Mission Statement 

The Holiday Decorating Committee is a group of 
volunteers who meet when requested by its chairman 
to discuss, arrange and implement the Holiday Light- 
ing Ceremony on Chelmsford Common usually the 
first weekend in December. The Committee, with the 
help of several interested individuals and groups, 
physically put up and take down all the tree lights. In 
addition the Committee organizes "Santa's" visit and 
this year arranged for a hayride available for all who 
attended the ceremony on the Common. The Com- 
mittee, for the past two years, has also worked with 
the center business district to sponsor a Holiday Pre- 
lude for benefit of the citizens of Chelmsford and 
their families. All of this has been free to the public. 

Budget 

Three years ago the Holiday Decorating Commit- 
tee went town wide to ask for donations to the Com- 
mittee since the Town of Chelmsford has no extra 
money to fund this event. We have asked for no 
money from the town, or received any to date. We 
have a bank account with the Shawmut (#500993183) 
with a balance as of February 1993, of $2276.00. 

Goals 

Our goal for the 1993 Lighting Ceremony will be 
to do much the same as this year. The hayride was 
very well attended (about 400 people) and the Prelude 
through the businesses in the Center was much appre- 
ciated by the business community as well as the par- 
ticipants. The number of people actually visiting the 
stores greatly increased over last year as reported by 
all of the businesses involved. We had additional 
lighting in the Center by buying miniature lights and 
putting them on the trees (we owe Walter Kelvin and 
Mass. Electric a tremendous thanks). We plan to pur- 
chase more of these lights as the Committee felt the 
number we have now appeared rather sparse. 

Budget Comments 

This year the Committee received no donations 
and had expenditures of $971.39. The Committee is 
in the process of requesting the Chelmsford Business 



Association consider us for a partial funding to help 
pay for the hayride. We would like to keep this event 
"free to the public" as we feel this event should not 
require payment which could restrict the ability of 
some residents to enjoy the event. 

The Committee would like to request that the 
Town consider a possible payment to cover electric 
charges if it is within the budget possibilities as all 
volunteers give freely to the Town of their time and 
efforts for the entire Chelmsford populous to enjoy. 



MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

The Town of Chelmsford is a member of the Cen- 
tral Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project 
(CMMCP). This regional project covers twenty-six 
(26) cities and towns throughout parts of Worcester 
and Middlesex counties. 

Mosquito populations are monitored and con- 
trolled by using an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) 
approach which makes use of a complete spectrum of 
techniques including: surveillance, the elimination of 
standing water that breeds mosquitoes, chemicals, 
and biological techniques. 

During 1992 we enhanced our surveillance pro- 
gram by adding rain gauges at all of our mosquito 
trap locations. This information is valuable when 
assessing the impact precipitation has on mosquito 
populations. By monitoring local precipitation levels 
we will be able to more accurately predict when pre- 
emergence control procedures can be implemented. 

As part of our public education program we have 
had a production company make a video of the pro- 
ject and our activities. This video "Working For You" 
depicts the various components of our program that 
comprise our IPM approach to modern mosquito con- 
trol. During the next several months we will be dis- 
tributing copies of this video to city and town officials 
and will make the video available to any interested 
citizens as well as the local cable television stations. 

We invite each of you to visit our Northborough 
headquarters. 

Project staff are available to give presentations to 
town officials, civic organizations and school children. 

Thank you for your past support and we look for- 
ward to serving you in 1993. 



95 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Members 

Will Perry, Chairman 

Angela Cosgrove 

Joe Dyer 

Peg Fudge 

James Sousa 

Personnel Coordinator 

Mary Mahan 

The Personnel Board meets on the second 
Wednesday of each month at the Town Offices. Spe- 
cial work sessions are scheduled when necessary. 

The Personnel Board consists of five members 
(four appointed by the Town Manager and one 
elected by non-union employees) . 

The Personnel Board developed a Job Evaluation 
system this year, which is being used to write job 
descriptions and formulate a classification plan. The 
Board also expects to complete a coordinating com- 
pensation plan. The Board plans to develop an 
employee performance appraisal system in addition to 
management communication and training programs 
in the upcoming year. 

In its role the Personnel Board supports fair, equi- 
table personnel practices affecting current Town 
employees and it perpetuates Chelmsford's reputation 
for attracting highly skilled and motivated employees. 



CHELMSFORD 
RECREATION COMMISSION 



Members 

Michael Ablove 
Robert Hayes 
Robert Charpentier 
Paul Murphy 
Evelyn Newman 
Jeff Stallard 
Ron Zylich 
Lorraine Murphy 



Chairman 
Vice Chairman 



Clerk 



Like all Town Departments, Recreation again was 
challenged by the budget crunch. Our goal to main- 
tain our summer programs on a self-supporting basis 
in 1992 was realized. 

The Commission hired a very competent staff, 
with Ed Keefe returning as the summer director. Ed 
supervised an excellent program and included two 



successful new projects: a baseball camp and a day 
trip to Water Country. 

Program fees remained the same in 1992, as they 
have in 1991 and 1990. As a results, registration for 
our summer programs were slightly higher than 1991, 
and enabled the summer program to remain self-sup- 
porting. The only area that is not self-supporting is 
the free swim at Freeman Lake. It is necessary to have 
two guards present 7 days a week throughout the 
summer. 

Our summer programs included swimming 
lessons, a water adjustment program for 3 and 4 year 
olds, tennis lessons, track and field, basketball and 
volleyball camps, and a very successful day camp at 
Varney playground. An advanced tennis program for 
teenagers depends on the number of registrations. A 
new camp was established for baseball. Recreation 
again sponsored many other not-for-profit sports 
camps, including field hockey, wrestling, football, 
girls' basketball, youth and high school age soccer. 
This coming summer a juggling camp offered by Brian 
Veth will be introduced. 

A 3-on-3 basketball tournament was completed, 
as well as the previously mentioned trip to Water 
Country. In 1993 we hope to introduce family trips to 
Canobie Lake Park and a Boston Red Sox. game. Reg- 
istration for all of our summer programs can be done 
at our Annual Activities Fair, held in June. The cost 
of the Activities Fair is absorbed by a grant from 
CAD AC (Community Alcohol and Drug Awareness 
Committee) . 

The Fourth of July Pre-Parade Race was another 
successful project for 1992. Thanks to continued 
financial support from Sully's Ice Cream, personnel 
supplied by The Courthouse, and help from a few 
local runners we were able to preserve a long standing 
Chelmsford tradition. 

Our workreation volunteer program was again 
implemented in 1992 and was again very helpful. 
These young volunteers helped in beach maintenance, 
checking residency at the beach, and also helped with 
children in the day camp. They did a great job and 
should be commended for their dedication. 

Early this winter, the Recreation Commission 
began its initial winter program with a six week ski 
school at Nashoba Valley. Over 100 Chelmsford 
youngsters in grades 3 through 8 participated in this 
very successful after-school activity. Bob Hayes was 
responsible for the development, organization and 
implementation of the program. Bob Charpentier vol- 
unteered his time to handle the printing of the regis- 
tration and information. 



96 



SOLID WASTE 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Solid Waste Advisory Committee (SWAC) is 
comprised of: 

Barbara Scavezze, Chairperson 

Allen Beebe 

Catherine Brown 

Kathryn Chamberlain 

Norman Eisenmann 

Robert McCallum 

The SWAC major accomplishments during the 
past year include: 

• Aided in the development and initiation of a 
three-year solid waste and recycling contract 
with Waste Management for all residents of 
Chelmsford, including senior housing com- 
plexes and multi-family complexes which had 
previously been excluded. 

• Aided in initiation of a paper recycling pro- 
gram in all Town offices this year. 

• Instituted a backyard compost project for resi- 
dents. 

• Aided in initiation of metal and glass recycling 
at all schools. 

• Produced and mailed several informational fly- 
ers to all residents communicating the proper 
methods, timing, and places for disposal of 
various types of recyclable material and solid 
waste. 

• On a weekly basis, prepared articles for a local 
newspaper to maintain our on-going emphasis 
on recycling and solid waste reeducation pro- 
grams. 

• Produced informational announcements for 
Cable 43. 

• Continued to staff (along with other volun- 
teers) the bimonthly Styrofoam drop-off. 

• Continued to work with other towns on pool- 
ing of information and resources. 

The SWAC goals for the next year include: 

• Institute a drop-off for yard waste to comply 



with state bans. 

• Increase participation in the recycling program 
to reduce the trash disposal costs. 

• Institute white paper recycling in all schools. 

• Start a bimonthly drop-off of metal items to 
reduce our trash disposal costs. 

• Continue to keep the residents informed of 
solid waste and recycling issues by weekly arti- 
cles, Cable 43 announcements, and informa- 
tional flyers. 

• Continue the Styrofoam drop-off. 



REPORT OF THE 
VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

During the year of 1992 there were no applica- 
tions received for assistance from Veterans of World 
War II. 

The funds on deposit in local banks earned inter- 
est and the total of funds now has reached 
$17,848.87. 

In the past information for assistance has come to 
the committee members from the Veterans' Benefits 
Department. 

Assistance is given in the form of payments to 
vendors for Fuel, Light, Clothing and Medical needs. 
Also rent and food payments have been granted. The 
committee has not approved the payment of cash 
grants. 

One member of the committee, Mr. Russell E. 
Butterfield, resigned due to ill health and because he 
is no longer a resident of Chelmsford. We do want to 
thank him for his past assistance and for his willing- 
ness to serve on the committee for a number of years. 

Present members; one from each voting precinct, 
are listed as follows: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 



Steven E.C. Belkakis, DDS 
Carl Lebedzinski 
James J. Walker 
John J. McNulty 
George F. Waite 
Alfred H. Coburn 
Robert T. Clough 
Thomas F. Balfrey 



97 



Precinct 9: Lloyd C. Greene, Jr. 

The committee members extend their apprecia- 
tion to the various town officers who have assisted 
the committee in the past. 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
and the Town Manager 

December 1, 1991 through December 31, 1992 

Balance on Hand as of November 30, 1991 $16,644.86 

Add Receipts: 

The MassBank for Savings, Reading, Mass. 
Interest 285.06 

The MassBank for Savings, Reading, Mass. 

Interest 349,36 

The Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 
Interest 569.59 



Total Interest Received: 


1,204.01 


Add Transfer: 




From Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank to 




MassBank for Savings 


7,557.97 


Total of Balance on Hand as of November 30, 1991 




and Interest Received and Transfer 


25,406.84 


Deduct Disbursements: 




Transfer to MassBank for Savings from Lowell 




Five Cent Savings Bank 


7,557.97 


Balance on Hand as of December 31, 1992 


$17,848.87 


ASSETS 




MassBank for Savings Account No. 91-128790-0 


12,381.71 


MassBank for Savings Account No. 2055696 


5,467.16 


Total Assets 


$17,848.87 


LIABILITIES 




Less Liabilities 


None 


Total Assets less Liabilities as of December 31, 1992 


$17,848.87 



Respectfully submitted, 

Town of Chelmsford 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



98 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointment to Town Committees 99 

Appointed Town Officials 62 

Board of Appeals 89 

Board of Health 63 

Board of Registrars 6 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Cemetery Commission 62 

Central Mass. Mosquito Control District 94 

Chelmsford Commission on Handicapped Affairs 91 

Conservation Commission 91 

Council on Aging 90 

Cultural Council 92 

Data Processing 82 

Department of Public Works 88 

Dog Officer 89 

Elected Officials 61 

Emergency Management 93 

Finance Department (Accountant, Assessors, Data Processing and Treasurer) 81 

Fire Department 83 

General Information 2 

Historical Commission 93 

Historical District Commission 93 

Holiday Decorating Committee 94 

Housing Authority 64 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 85 

Personnel Board 95 

Planning Board 67 

Police Department 86 

Police Auxiliary 87 

Public Libraries 66 

Recreation Commission 95 

School Committee 69 

Sewer Commission 80 

Solid Waste Advisory Committee 96 

Town Celebrations 91 

Town Clerk 6 

Town Meetings and Elections 

Warrant for Presidential Primary - March 10, 1992 

Presidential Primary Results 8 

Warrant for Annual Town Election and Town Meeting 12 

Results of Annual Town Election - April 7, 1992 15 

Annual Town Meeting - April 27, 1992 18 

Special Town Meeting - April 27, 1992 19 

Adjourned Special Town Meeting - April 30, 1992 26 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting - May 4, 1992 31 

Special Town Election - May 27, 1992 38 

Results of Special Town Election 38 

Warrant for State Primary Election - September 15, 1992 39 

Results of State Primary Election 40 

Annual Town Meeting - October 19, 1992 43 

Special Town Meeting - October 29, 1992 49 

Warrant for State Election - November 5, 1992 57 

Results of State Election 58 

Representative Town Meeting Members 60 

Town Directory Back Cover 

Town Manager 4 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 96 

Veterans' Services 90 



99 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER 

TOWN OFFICES 

50 BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MA 01824-2777 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 



If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, 
please fill out this form and mail to: Town Manager, Town Offices, 
50 Billerica Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824. The filling out of this 
form in no way assures appointment. All committee vacancies will 
be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular 
capacity. 



NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE. 

ADDRESS AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE. 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE. 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING. 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM 

EXPIRED 



REMARKS 



100 



Notes 



101 



Notes 



102 



Notes 



103 



Notes 



104 



Notes 



"Disabled individuals requiring auxiliary aides to fully benefit from the Town of 
Chelmsford's programs should contact Mary Mahan at 250-5201. It is necessary to give 
the request at least one week in advance. " 






TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting 250-5215 

Assessors 250-5220 

Board of Appeals 250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 p.m.) 
Building Inspector 250-5225 

(Yard Sales, Kennel & Bldg. Permits) 

Cemetery 250-5245 

Community Teamwork 459-0551 

Conservation Commission 250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 pm) 

Council on Aging 251-0533 

Dog Officer 256-0754 

Fire Department 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business 250-5265 

Gas Inspector 250-5225 

Health Department 250-524 1 

Highway Department 250-5270 

Garage 250-5271 

High School 251-8729 

Housing Authority 256-7425 

Libraries: Adams 256-5521 

McKay 251-3212 

Mass. Electric Co 683-9511 

Planning Board Clerk 250-5231 

Plumbing Inspector 250-5225 

Police Department 256-2521 

Post Office (Center) 256-2361 

Recreation Commission 250-5262 

(8:30 am-12:30 pm) 

Registry of Deeds (Lowell) 458-8474 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 459-9397 

School Administration 251-4981 

Selectmen 250-5201 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Town Clerk 250-5205 

Town Engineer 250-5228 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 250-5210 

Veterans' Agent 251-0123 

Water Dept 256-2381 

Welfare, Lowell 454-8061 

Wiring Inspector 250-5225 

24-hr. Juror Hotline 1-800-792-5117 



POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS 

Precinct 1: Town Offices Gym 
Precinct 2: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 3: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 4: Westlands School 
Precinct 5: Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: Westlands School 
Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 9: Town Offices Gym 

U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

JFK Federal Bldg. Boston, MA 02202 
431 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 
1 202-224-4543 

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry 

10 Park Plaza 

Boston, MA 02116 

362 Russell Office Building 

Washington, DC 20510 

Congressman Martin T. Meehan 

1429 Longworth House Bldg. 
Washington, DC 20515 
508-459-0101 (Lowell) Office 

State Representative Carol Cleven 

Room 36 State House 

Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2552 

Home: 4 Arbutus Avenue 

Chelmsford, MA 

508-256-5043 

State Senator Lucile C. Hicks 

Room 413G - State House 
Boston, MA 02133 
617-722-1572 

Middlesex County Commission 

Superior Courthouse 

East Cambridge, MA 02141 

494-4100